Connect with us

Entertainment

TikTok To Get Full-Time SiriusXM Station This Summer

Published

on

Both companies said the channel will serve as a “radio version” of TikTok’s popular “For You” page.


TikTok Lands SiriusXM Channel

TikTok is partnering with Pandora and its parent company SiriusXM on several projects, including a full-time radio station and playlists curated by popular creators on the video-sharing platform.

The project will allow SiriusXM to reach a younger audience, as well as cement TikTok’s status as an emerging staple and tastemaker in the music industry. 

In a Monday press release, the companies said that TikTok Radio will be coming to SiriusXM this summer. It will be a 24-hour station “featuring the trending sounds that are redefining pop culture from TikTok.” The release added that the station will “feel like a radio version of the platform’s ‘For You’ page” and include “a diverse group of TikTok creators showcasing trending music and stories behind the songs throughout each day, as well as a weekly music countdown dedicated to TikTok’s top trending tracks.”

TikTok Creators Will Curate Pandora Playlists

On top of this, Pandora launched a series of playlists curated and hosted by popular TikTok creators on Monday. These creators will select their favorite songs and give listeners exclusive commentary. The series kicked off with Bella Poarch, who teased her playlist on TikTok, and will soon include other creators like Christian Shelton and Nick Tangorra.

@bellapoarch

✨ Excited to help launch ##TikTokTastemakers on @pandora ✨ Listen exclusively on ##PandoraMusic

♬ Build a B*tch – Bella Poarch
https://www.tiktok.com/embed.js

TikTok users will also have access to select re-airings of Pandora’s original events series, Pandora LIVE, which has recently featured the likes of Gwen Stefani and Jazmine Sullivan.

“The effect TikTok has on music, and pop culture in general, is undeniable,” Scott Greenstein, the President and Chief Content Officer of SiriusXM said in a statement. “Our platforms will provide a unique opportunity for TikTok creators to engage with our listeners with content experiences that have never been done before in audio.”

TikTok’s Global Head of Music, Ole Obermann, added that this partnership will “make the trends, music, and creative influences that are playing such a dening role in modern culture even more accessible.”

“TikTok is redefining the way that fans discover music and artists, while enabling a new form of musical engagement and creative expression,” he said. “We are excited to work with SiriusXM on TikTok Radio and to bring TikTok creators to Pandora.” 

TikTok’s Impact on the Music Industry 

TikTok’s influence on culture, music in particular, has been substantial. Some of the platform’s biggest stars, like Dixie D’Amelio and Addison Rae, have been able to turn their TikTok success into music careers. D’Amelio has over 4 million monthly Spotify listeners and some of her songs have been streamed tens of millions of times. Rae’s first single “Obsessed” has amassed 13 million streams since its debut in March. 

Music artists have also been able to use TikTok to launch into the mainstream and soar to the top of the charts. In the summer of 2019, Lil Nas X’s “Old Town Road” broke the record for the longest time a song has ever spent at number one on the Billboard charts after he used TikTok to make his song a viral sensation. 

Trends on TikTok also pushed Olivia Rodrigo’s debut single “Driver’s License” to number one earlier in 2021. Now, her latest single “Good 4 U” similarly debuted at number one, and her new album “Sour” is one of the most talked-about albums of the year so far. 

By partnering with SiriusXM, TikTok is finding yet another way to modernize the music industry and proving that its overall impact on the business is just starting.

See what others are saying: (The Verge) (Variety) (TechCrunch)

Entertainment

Petition Slams James Corden’s “Spill Your Guts” Segment as “Culturally Offensive and Insensitive”

Published

on

More than 13,000 signed the petition calling for the segment’s removal from “The Late Late Show,” arguing that it mocks Asian cuisine and culture.


Petition Collects 13,000 Signatures

James Corden is facing pressure to remove the famous “Spill Your Guts or Fill Your Guts” segment from his late-night talk show after a petition accused him of mocking Asian cuisine and culture. 

That petition, which was started on Tuesday by 24-year-old California resident Kim Saira, has collected over 13,000 signatures as of Friday morning. 

During the popular segment of “The Late Late Show,” Corden asks celebrity guests very personal questions, giving them the option to either answer or eat the food presented in front of them. Corden often gawks at the options and calls them “disgusting,” positioning the dishes as so unpleasant, the guest would rather reveal something intimate about themselves on national television than take a bite. 

However, as the petition notes, “many of the foods that he presents to his guests are actually from different Asian cultures. He’s presented foods such as balut, century-old eggs, and chicken feet, [which] are often regularly eaten by Asian people.”

Stars who have taken part in the bit include Kendall Jenner, Harry Styles, Justin Bieber, Alicia Keys, and Will Ferrell. On YouTube, many videos of the segment have tens of millions of views.

Segment Accused of Spreading Anti-Asian Rhetoric

Saira made a now-viral TikTok on Monday calling the segment out, then made the petition, where she specifically accused Corden of perpetuating racist and xenophobic stereotypes about Asian culture to his massive audience. 

“In the wake of the constant Asian hate crimes that have continuously been occurring, not only is this segment incredibly culturally offensive and insensitive, but it also encourages anti-Asian racism,” she wrote. “So many Asian Americans are consistently bullied and mocked for their native foods, and this segment amplifies and encourages it.”

Saira told TODAY that she used to be a fan of Corden but was shocked when she first saw “Spill Your Guts or Fill Your Guts” for the first time around a year ago. The particular interview she caught featured Jimmy Kimmel, who was offered balut, among other things. 

“Wow, it all looks so terrible,” Kimmel said before joking about the likewise foul smell. 

“It’s really disgusting, it’s horrific,” Corden added. 

“Balut is like, very specific to Filipino culture,” Saira told TODAY. “It’s a food that I have been eating whenever I go to the Philippines with my grandma and my cousins, so it’s a very sentimental food to me, and I noticed that he was presenting it to a guest and calling it gross.”

“I was just so confused,” she continued, “and I feel like it was a moment of me just being like, ‘Oh my gosh, like, this is my culture. I don’t understand why he’s making fun of it?'”

Signees Demand Changes or Total Removal of Segment

Her petition asks for the segment to be removed, or at least changed so that it is no longer culturally insensitive. It also asks for Corden to issue a public apology and donate to local Asian American organizations that are working with Asian-owned restaurants and small businesses.

“They very purposely chose these food items to be ‘exotic’ and ‘disgusting,’” one signee wrote. “Shaming foods of other cultures is not ok even if you don’t personally want to eat them. It also furthers stereotypes that Asian people eat more ‘unacceptable’ or ‘inferior’ foods. I endured years of bullying because of harmful rhetoric like this.”

“This is how anti-Asian racism is perpetuated,” another person added. “This segment is nothing short of racist, xenophobic, orientalist, and wrong. Asian food is not ‘disgusting’ but this segment is.”

Others said the bit was “offensive and lazy” and accused the show of “cultural mockery.

Neither Corden nor CBS have responded to the controversy.

See what others are saying: (TODAY) (Yahoo News) (Independent)

Continue Reading

Entertainment

Corinna Kopf Accused of Scamming Fans With OnlyFans Launch

Published

on

Fans were outraged after learning that photos Kopf posted to her OnlyFans reportedly mirrored pictures she had already shared on her public Instagram.


Corinna Kopf Launches OnlyFans

YouTuber and influencer Corinna Kopf responded to accusations Wednesday that her recently launched OnlyFans account was a “scam” that recycled her already public content. 

On June 3, Kopf posted a tweet saying that she would join OnlyFan if her post earned 500,000 likes. That post fell fairly shy of her goal, racking up around 428,000 likes, but that didn’t stop Kopf from building a profile on the lucrative NSFW website anyways.

Kopf officially launched the account on Wednesday morning.

A subscription to her OnlyFans costs $25 a month and after just a day of it being live, fans are already throwing criticism her way. According to Meaww, by Wednesday night Kopf had posted 11 photos, some of which were already on her Instagram. 

Kopf Faces Backlash For Reused Content

Many took to Twitter to complain about the overlap in content and warn others that Kopf’s page looked like a ruse. 

Later in the day, Kopf promised more original content was on the way. 

“People who think my OnlyFans is about to be just ‘instagram content’… you’re dead wrong.” she wrote. “If I posted everything right out the gate, it would just get leaked…just wait.”

Users Leak Kopf’s OnlyFans Content Online

Kopf’s concerns that her content would get leaked were not unfounded. Not long after she launched her page, images from her OnlyFans were already being circulated on social media. Someone even created a Twitter account called “Corinna Kopf OnlyFans” that promised to privately message the photos she shared to users who were interested. 

“I’ve got all the posts,” that person wrote. “Send me a DM if you’d like them.”

Kopf responded to them, warning they could “catch a lawsuit.” She later deleted that post.

Source: Twitter @CorinnaKopf

On Thursday, she addressed the leaks again, implying those allegedly responsible could face legal consequences. 

“A long long long list of people who are leaking content is being made,” she wrote. “I’m about to make more money off of these people than my OF itself.”

She also claimed that some of the people allegedly sharing her content are underage, then later deleted both of those posts as well.

Source: Twitter @CorinnaKopf
Source: Twitter @CorinnaKopf

Kopf’s OnlyFans bio explicitly states that she owns the copyright to all the material posted and that followers do not have permission to redistribute what she shares. 

“Failure to comply with this WILL result in legal action taken against the person [whose] information you used to sign up with,” it adds.

See what others are saying: (Newsweek) (HITC) (Sportskeeda)

Continue Reading

Entertainment

Fashion Line Inspired by Disney’s “Cruella” Was Made Without Designer’s Knowledge

Published

on

Designers are frequently snubbed out of licensing deals when it comes to merchandise, and now leaders in the Costume Designers Guild are calling for them to get their due credit.


Fashion Line Made Without Jenny Beavan’s Knowledge

A fashion line inspired by the acclaimed costumes in Disney’s new film “Cruella” was released without the knowledge of the award-winning designer who worked on the film.

Jenny Beavan has been a costume designer for several decades, earning 10 Academy Award nominations and winning two: one for “Mad Max: Fury Road” and another for “A Room With a View.” Prior to the pandemic temporarily shutting the industry down, she was tasked with designing the eye-popping frocks in “Cruella,” a movie where the costumes are especially important because the film itself centers around a war of fashion. 

Beavan told Variety that there had been some discussions with Disney about co-branded products for Target and Singer sewing machines, as well as talks about a possible fashion collection, but once production ended and COVID-19 hit, that moved to the backburner. She said she never heard another word about it until a month ago when a friend sent her an Instagram post where Rag & Bone advertised its new officially licensed “Cruella”-inspired collection. The friend asked if Beavan was involved, but she said she had never even heard of it until seeing that post.

“I just was sort of horrified,” she told Variety. “The thing about ‘Cruella’ is that you’ve got a film about fashion, about two fashion designers. The whole story is them almost having a war using fashion. So, that’s so disrespectful to then bring out fashion lines.”

Costume Designers Frequently Get Snubbed Out of Licensing Deals

Like she has throughout her career, Beavan worked tirelessly on the costumes for “Cruella.” She told Vogue she traveled from London to New York to Los Angeles collecting vintage pieces, ultimately putting together a total of 47 original looks for the titular character, played by Emma Stone, alone. 

Stone’s co-star, Emma Thompson, wore another 33 original outfits. On top of this, Vanity Fair reported that in some scenes, Beavan was responsible for dressing up to 150–200 background characters in some scenes with large crowds. While reviews for the film vary, the one thing critics largely agree on is that the costumes were a smashing highlight.

Despite the hard work that Beavan and so many other designers put into curating cohesive looks for their films, it is actually quite common for designers to be snubbed out of licensing agreements when the film’s outfits turn into a commercial spectacle. 

According to Variety, a licensed “Birds of Prey” collection was released by Her Universe without the involvement of designer Erin Benach. Mona May, the designer behind the famous ensembles in “Clueless” and “Enchanted,” was similarly slighted when it came to merchandise involving the costumes she made for both films. 

She told Variety she remembered seeing “Clueless” dolls in 1995 that wore her costumes “like verbatim — the yellow suit, the black suit.” She said she found it “shocking that I was not involved at all and I had no compensation for something that huge.”

She also said the princess dress Amy Adams’ character wore in “Enchanted” ended up being remade “to a tee” into children’s costumes.

“It’s such an old studio system in the sense that we basically sign [away] our life when we sign a contract, and there is no way around it,” she told Variety. Beavan likewise told the outlet that no matter how hard contracts are negotiated, “You basically do sign your life away,”

New York-based fashion writer Laurie Brookins added on Twitter that scandals like this are unfortunately “far from new.”

“As far back as the 1930s, studios worked with retailers — the Macy’s Cinema Shop was the best example — on designs that were sometimes exact copies of film costumes,” she said. “Joan Crawford’s ‘Letty Lynton’ dress sold like crazy; Adrian [the designer] never saw a penny.

Costume Designers Guild and Stylists Speak Out

While Variety‘s report noted that there are cases where designers get to be involved in lines inspired by the shows they worked on, like ones for “Mad Men” and “Gossip Girl”, more often than not, designers are not so lucky.  and more, where designers for those shows got to be involved in related lines, it is by no means a common practice, and most designers are not so lucky. 

“Historically, this is a huge issue for our membership, and for all costume designers,” the communications director for the Costume Design Guild Anna Wyckoff told Variety. “Because, as everyone knows, a costume has a long life after the project — in merchandising and toys and Halloween costumes. So there are many opportunities for the costumes to be used in an ancillary marketing fashion.”

The Guild’s president, Salvador Pérez Jr. echoed similar frustrations and called for designers to get their due credit when merchandise includes their work.

“As costume designers, our work has a life beyond the screen,” he told the outlet. “Our work is reproduced for toys, costumes, fashion collections and more. Not only are we not allowed to participate in the profits made off of the merchandising, we aren’t even credited for our work on the original designs.”

“Costume designers who help generate additional revenues from productions deserve to be compensated for the additional income earned,” he continued.

Other designers, including Mumbai-based stylist Vaidehi Krishnan, echoed his calls. Krishnan wrote that not crediting designers is “disrespectful to the art of moviemaking. Especially when characters would be naked without us.”

Some, including the Costume Designer’s Guild and designers like Kathleen Felix Hager, are starting to use the hashtags #NakedWithoutUs and #CreditCostumeDesigners in hopes of bringing attention to these issues. 

Disney did not respond to Variety’s request for comment.

See what others are saying: (Variety) (ScreenRant) (Daily Dot)

Continue Reading