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MrBeast Accused of Creating Toxic Workplace

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  • YouTuber MrBeast, who is known for his massive giveaways, was accused of fostering a toxic workplace in a Tuesday article by The New York Times. 
  • One former employee claimed he quit after a week because MrBeast had unreasonable demands and “nothing ever worked for him.”
  • Another, named Matt Turner, said he was berated almost every day and was often called a “phrase used to insult people with mental disabilities.” 
  • Turner previously posted several videos about his experience working for MrBeast. In one, he praised the YouTuber and thanked him for a fun experience, but in another, he painted a negative and hostile picture of MrBeast.

MrBeast Accused of Creating Toxic Workplace

YouTuber MrBeast was accused of creating a toxic workplace in a Tuesday article from The New York Times. 

Jimmy Donaldson, who goes by MrBeast online, is known for his massive giveaways and “stunt philanthropy” videos. He has gained a substantial following and as The Times, noted, is a huge influence for many young creators. 

However, former employees said that behind the scenes, Donaldson is a very different person. According to The Times, his corporate entities “have been rife with favoritism and bullying.”

Matt Turner, who was an editor for Donaldson between 2018 and 2019, said that he was berated “almost every day” and that Donaldson often called him by a “phrase used to insult people with mental disabilities,” which would leave him in tears. 

According to the report, Donaldson initially largely hired friends to work for him, but as his empire grew, so did his number of staffers. Turner told The Times that while those friends got to be in videos, he struggled to be acknowledged. 

“I was not to be credited for anything I did,” Turner said. “I’d ask for credit, he’d credit someone else.”

Another former staffer, Nate Anderson, said he worked for Donaldson for a week in 2018 before quitting because of what he described as unreasonable demands.

“Nothing ever worked for him,” he told The Times. “He always wanted it a certain way.”

When Anderson uploaded a video describing his experience, he was met with hateful messages and even death threats from Donaldson’s fans. Turner said the same happened to him when he posted videos and wrote about his experience on social media. 

The Times spoke to, 20-year-old Akash Rathod, a fan who found Donaldson’s silence regarding these complaints and the subsequent death threats from his followers troubling. 

“There needs to be more from Mr. Beast on the issues his fans are causing,” Rathod said. “It’s not enough just to make positive videos.”

Donaldson did not give a comment to The Times for their piece. A representative for him declined to talk about the workplace allegations and only acknowledged a part of the piece that briefly mentioned Donaldson’s past use of slurs and offensive jokes.

“When Jimmy was a teenager and was first starting out, he carelessly used, on more than one occasion, a gay slur,” the representative said. 

They added that he now “knows there is no excuse for homophobic rhetoric” and “has grown up and matured into someone that doesn’t speak like that.”

Former Employee’s Previous Remarks

Rogue Rocket reached out to Donaldson for comment. In response, MrBeast sent a clip that Turner previously posted where he discussed his work experience in a much brighter light. In that video, which has since been deleted but exists in reuploads, Turner referred to the gig as a “dream job” and recommended others work for Donaldson. 

“If you have the opportunity to get this job that I had, totally take it,” he said. “It’s a lot of fun. It was basically just like a friendship. And going to work was a blast each and every day.” 

Turner then said his decision to part ways from the role was mutual, as the company knew he would not be in the job for the long haul. Turner said he was going to college, wanted to backpack across Asia, and was considering moving to Los Angeles eventually, so they decided to part ways. 

He also claimed that even after he was no longer working there, Donaldson, who had been paying for his rent while he worked for him, continued to pay for him to stay in his apartment and encouraged him to stay as long as he needed. Turner said he even continued to receive paychecks after he left the job for an unspecified period of time. 

“And that is basically funding my trip to backpack across Asia,” he explained. “He’s saying, ‘You don’t have to work for me, but I’ll still pay you. And because of that, I hope that lets you live in L.A., go to college, backpack Asia, whatever you want to do after this, I want to set you up for that.’” 

“If you’re watching this MrBeast, I fucking love you bro,” he continued. 

However, these are not the only remarks Turner has made about his experience working for Donaldson prior to the release of The New York Times report. He previously posted several tweets, which were later taken down, describing a hostile environment where he was “bullied” and “having mental breakdowns day after day.”

He also posted another video, which was deleted but has been partially reuploaded by other channels, where he said that he only posted positive remarks about Donaldson to “clout chase” because he was afraid of what would happen if he spoke ill of the YouTuber. He then painted a much more confrontational picture of Donaldson, telling a story where Donaldson allegedly wiped an entire project and cursed at him after being unhappy with an edit.

Taylor Laurenz, who wrote the article about Donaldson in The New York Times, told Insider that this story is reflective of a larger issue within creator culture. 

“For a large portion of Gen Z that doesn’t want to be creators themselves, working for a creator seems like an absolute dream job,” she said. “But we see time and time again that these creators have basically little to no management experiences and, behind the scenes, can create a really hostile, stressful environment.”

“Working for a 22-year-old YouTube star isn’t going to be the most professional work environment,” she added. “But if you are posturing yourself as a business leader or the next Elon Musk, you should think about the type of work culture you’re creating and what you are rewarding.”

See what others are saying: (The New York Times) (Insider) (Dexerto)

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Petition Slams James Corden’s “Spill Your Guts” Segment as “Culturally Offensive and Insensitive”

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More than 13,000 signed the petition calling for the segment’s removal from “The Late Late Show,” arguing that it mocks Asian cuisine and culture.


Petition Collects 13,000 Signatures

James Corden is facing pressure to remove the famous “Spill Your Guts or Fill Your Guts” segment from his late-night talk show after a petition accused him of mocking Asian cuisine and culture. 

That petition, which was started on Tuesday by 24-year-old California resident Kim Saira, has collected over 13,000 signatures as of Friday morning. 

During the popular segment of “The Late Late Show,” Corden asks celebrity guests very personal questions, giving them the option to either answer or eat the food presented in front of them. Corden often gawks at the options and calls them “disgusting,” positioning the dishes as so unpleasant, the guest would rather reveal something intimate about themselves on national television than take a bite. 

However, as the petition notes, “many of the foods that he presents to his guests are actually from different Asian cultures. He’s presented foods such as balut, century-old eggs, and chicken feet, [which] are often regularly eaten by Asian people.”

Stars who have taken part in the bit include Kendall Jenner, Harry Styles, Justin Bieber, Alicia Keys, and Will Ferrell. On YouTube, many videos of the segment have tens of millions of views.

Segment Accused of Spreading Anti-Asian Rhetoric

Saira made a now-viral TikTok on Monday calling the segment out, then made the petition, where she specifically accused Corden of perpetuating racist and xenophobic stereotypes about Asian culture to his massive audience. 

“In the wake of the constant Asian hate crimes that have continuously been occurring, not only is this segment incredibly culturally offensive and insensitive, but it also encourages anti-Asian racism,” she wrote. “So many Asian Americans are consistently bullied and mocked for their native foods, and this segment amplifies and encourages it.”

Saira told TODAY that she used to be a fan of Corden but was shocked when she first saw “Spill Your Guts or Fill Your Guts” for the first time around a year ago. The particular interview she caught featured Jimmy Kimmel, who was offered balut, among other things. 

“Wow, it all looks so terrible,” Kimmel said before joking about the likewise foul smell. 

“It’s really disgusting, it’s horrific,” Corden added. 

“Balut is like, very specific to Filipino culture,” Saira told TODAY. “It’s a food that I have been eating whenever I go to the Philippines with my grandma and my cousins, so it’s a very sentimental food to me, and I noticed that he was presenting it to a guest and calling it gross.”

“I was just so confused,” she continued, “and I feel like it was a moment of me just being like, ‘Oh my gosh, like, this is my culture. I don’t understand why he’s making fun of it?'”

Signees Demand Changes or Total Removal of Segment

Her petition asks for the segment to be removed, or at least changed so that it is no longer culturally insensitive. It also asks for Corden to issue a public apology and donate to local Asian American organizations that are working with Asian-owned restaurants and small businesses.

“They very purposely chose these food items to be ‘exotic’ and ‘disgusting,’” one signee wrote. “Shaming foods of other cultures is not ok even if you don’t personally want to eat them. It also furthers stereotypes that Asian people eat more ‘unacceptable’ or ‘inferior’ foods. I endured years of bullying because of harmful rhetoric like this.”

“This is how anti-Asian racism is perpetuated,” another person added. “This segment is nothing short of racist, xenophobic, orientalist, and wrong. Asian food is not ‘disgusting’ but this segment is.”

Others said the bit was “offensive and lazy” and accused the show of “cultural mockery.

Neither Corden nor CBS have responded to the controversy.

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Corinna Kopf Accused of Scamming Fans With OnlyFans Launch

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Fans were outraged after learning that photos Kopf posted to her OnlyFans reportedly mirrored pictures she had already shared on her public Instagram.


Corinna Kopf Launches OnlyFans

YouTuber and influencer Corinna Kopf responded to accusations Wednesday that her recently launched OnlyFans account was a “scam” that recycled her already public content. 

On June 3, Kopf posted a tweet saying that she would join OnlyFan if her post earned 500,000 likes. That post fell fairly shy of her goal, racking up around 428,000 likes, but that didn’t stop Kopf from building a profile on the lucrative NSFW website anyways.

Kopf officially launched the account on Wednesday morning.

A subscription to her OnlyFans costs $25 a month and after just a day of it being live, fans are already throwing criticism her way. According to Meaww, by Wednesday night Kopf had posted 11 photos, some of which were already on her Instagram. 

Kopf Faces Backlash For Reused Content

Many took to Twitter to complain about the overlap in content and warn others that Kopf’s page looked like a ruse. 

Later in the day, Kopf promised more original content was on the way. 

“People who think my OnlyFans is about to be just ‘instagram content’… you’re dead wrong.” she wrote. “If I posted everything right out the gate, it would just get leaked…just wait.”

Users Leak Kopf’s OnlyFans Content Online

Kopf’s concerns that her content would get leaked were not unfounded. Not long after she launched her page, images from her OnlyFans were already being circulated on social media. Someone even created a Twitter account called “Corinna Kopf OnlyFans” that promised to privately message the photos she shared to users who were interested. 

“I’ve got all the posts,” that person wrote. “Send me a DM if you’d like them.”

Kopf responded to them, warning they could “catch a lawsuit.” She later deleted that post.

Source: Twitter @CorinnaKopf

On Thursday, she addressed the leaks again, implying those allegedly responsible could face legal consequences. 

“A long long long list of people who are leaking content is being made,” she wrote. “I’m about to make more money off of these people than my OF itself.”

She also claimed that some of the people allegedly sharing her content are underage, then later deleted both of those posts as well.

Source: Twitter @CorinnaKopf
Source: Twitter @CorinnaKopf

Kopf’s OnlyFans bio explicitly states that she owns the copyright to all the material posted and that followers do not have permission to redistribute what she shares. 

“Failure to comply with this WILL result in legal action taken against the person [whose] information you used to sign up with,” it adds.

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Fashion Line Inspired by Disney’s “Cruella” Was Made Without Designer’s Knowledge

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Designers are frequently snubbed out of licensing deals when it comes to merchandise, and now leaders in the Costume Designers Guild are calling for them to get their due credit.


Fashion Line Made Without Jenny Beavan’s Knowledge

A fashion line inspired by the acclaimed costumes in Disney’s new film “Cruella” was released without the knowledge of the award-winning designer who worked on the film.

Jenny Beavan has been a costume designer for several decades, earning 10 Academy Award nominations and winning two: one for “Mad Max: Fury Road” and another for “A Room With a View.” Prior to the pandemic temporarily shutting the industry down, she was tasked with designing the eye-popping frocks in “Cruella,” a movie where the costumes are especially important because the film itself centers around a war of fashion. 

Beavan told Variety that there had been some discussions with Disney about co-branded products for Target and Singer sewing machines, as well as talks about a possible fashion collection, but once production ended and COVID-19 hit, that moved to the backburner. She said she never heard another word about it until a month ago when a friend sent her an Instagram post where Rag & Bone advertised its new officially licensed “Cruella”-inspired collection. The friend asked if Beavan was involved, but she said she had never even heard of it until seeing that post.

“I just was sort of horrified,” she told Variety. “The thing about ‘Cruella’ is that you’ve got a film about fashion, about two fashion designers. The whole story is them almost having a war using fashion. So, that’s so disrespectful to then bring out fashion lines.”

Costume Designers Frequently Get Snubbed Out of Licensing Deals

Like she has throughout her career, Beavan worked tirelessly on the costumes for “Cruella.” She told Vogue she traveled from London to New York to Los Angeles collecting vintage pieces, ultimately putting together a total of 47 original looks for the titular character, played by Emma Stone, alone. 

Stone’s co-star, Emma Thompson, wore another 33 original outfits. On top of this, Vanity Fair reported that in some scenes, Beavan was responsible for dressing up to 150–200 background characters in some scenes with large crowds. While reviews for the film vary, the one thing critics largely agree on is that the costumes were a smashing highlight.

Despite the hard work that Beavan and so many other designers put into curating cohesive looks for their films, it is actually quite common for designers to be snubbed out of licensing agreements when the film’s outfits turn into a commercial spectacle. 

According to Variety, a licensed “Birds of Prey” collection was released by Her Universe without the involvement of designer Erin Benach. Mona May, the designer behind the famous ensembles in “Clueless” and “Enchanted,” was similarly slighted when it came to merchandise involving the costumes she made for both films. 

She told Variety she remembered seeing “Clueless” dolls in 1995 that wore her costumes “like verbatim — the yellow suit, the black suit.” She said she found it “shocking that I was not involved at all and I had no compensation for something that huge.”

She also said the princess dress Amy Adams’ character wore in “Enchanted” ended up being remade “to a tee” into children’s costumes.

“It’s such an old studio system in the sense that we basically sign [away] our life when we sign a contract, and there is no way around it,” she told Variety. Beavan likewise told the outlet that no matter how hard contracts are negotiated, “You basically do sign your life away,”

New York-based fashion writer Laurie Brookins added on Twitter that scandals like this are unfortunately “far from new.”

“As far back as the 1930s, studios worked with retailers — the Macy’s Cinema Shop was the best example — on designs that were sometimes exact copies of film costumes,” she said. “Joan Crawford’s ‘Letty Lynton’ dress sold like crazy; Adrian [the designer] never saw a penny.

Costume Designers Guild and Stylists Speak Out

While Variety‘s report noted that there are cases where designers get to be involved in lines inspired by the shows they worked on, like ones for “Mad Men” and “Gossip Girl”, more often than not, designers are not so lucky.  and more, where designers for those shows got to be involved in related lines, it is by no means a common practice, and most designers are not so lucky. 

“Historically, this is a huge issue for our membership, and for all costume designers,” the communications director for the Costume Design Guild Anna Wyckoff told Variety. “Because, as everyone knows, a costume has a long life after the project — in merchandising and toys and Halloween costumes. So there are many opportunities for the costumes to be used in an ancillary marketing fashion.”

The Guild’s president, Salvador Pérez Jr. echoed similar frustrations and called for designers to get their due credit when merchandise includes their work.

“As costume designers, our work has a life beyond the screen,” he told the outlet. “Our work is reproduced for toys, costumes, fashion collections and more. Not only are we not allowed to participate in the profits made off of the merchandising, we aren’t even credited for our work on the original designs.”

“Costume designers who help generate additional revenues from productions deserve to be compensated for the additional income earned,” he continued.

Other designers, including Mumbai-based stylist Vaidehi Krishnan, echoed his calls. Krishnan wrote that not crediting designers is “disrespectful to the art of moviemaking. Especially when characters would be naked without us.”

Some, including the Costume Designer’s Guild and designers like Kathleen Felix Hager, are starting to use the hashtags #NakedWithoutUs and #CreditCostumeDesigners in hopes of bringing attention to these issues. 

Disney did not respond to Variety’s request for comment.

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