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Austin McBroom Launches “How I Became a Millionaire” Program for $50/Month, But Some Think It’s Just Another Scam

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  • Austin McBroom, the vlogger behind the ACE Family YouTube channel, is launching a new program called “How I Became a Millionaire,” which aims to teach subscribers “the secrets to social media.”
  • Among other perks, the program’s $50 a month “Gold Tier” claims it will select “a few people to verify/blue check.”
  • The site for the new program quickly became overwhelmed as fans flooded to sign up; however, others believe it could be a scam similar to a previous program from McBroom: the ACE Club. 

McBroom’s Millionaire Program

Family vlogger Austin McBroom announced Sunday that he was launching a new program called “How I Became a Millionaire,” but some fans are convinced that its just another scam aimed at the creator’s younger audience. 

“I’m here today to teach all of you the secrets to social media and to help you accomplish your dreams,” McBroom, who posts videos on the ACE family’s YouTube channel, said in an Instagram video announcement. “In order to be able to have access to all of these courses, you must join now. You only have 24 hours.” 

The program defaults to its $50 a month “Gold Tier” membership when users attempt to sign up for the four-course series, which includes: “How to grow your social media platforms, how to make money from social media, how to start a business,” and “how to grow your business.”

The “Gold” membership also includes access to longer videos and an exclusive private community chat. Additionally, McBroom promises to select “a few people for weekly FaceTime calls” and “to promote per month.” He even claims he will be able to “verify/blue check” a “few” subscribers. 

Users can also opt for a much cheaper experience by paying $8 a month for its “Silver Tier” membership, which will include only the four-course series, as well as an additional 48 videos released over the next year.

Soon after launch, many trying to sign up for the program began experiencing technical problems, with some even reporting that their cards had been declined. 

Later that day, in an Instagram story, McBroom said the site had been temporarily “overwhelmed” due to “high traffic.”

Source: @hibmprogram

Some Think This Is Another ACE Club “Scam

Technical difficulties aren’t the only issues fans have had with this new program.

Some have compared it to another business venture from McBroom: the ACE Club. Notably, that was a $3 a month subscription service that was meant to come with exclusive content, livestreams, and even giveaways; however, about six months ago, that program shut down.

“Unfortunately, the people that we partnered with in that venture… ended up scamming us,” McBroom said in an Instagram Live.

“It kind of like hurt us in a way because, in reality, like, you guys got scammed,” he added, “And unfortunately we had to stop funding the ACE Club.”

While McBroom said he refunded everyone who signed up for the ACE Club, some are already worried his latest venture could result in a similar situation.

“How to be a Millionaire: Scam your following into paying you 50 bucks a month,” one person tweeted. “Tell them they only have 24 hours so it feels urgent, and doesn’t give them time to think about the purchase. Austin McBroom & Ace Family are scummmmmmm.”

Others have accused Broom of exploiting and taking advantage of his younger fans with the seeming promise of wealth.

To note, Broom’s language appears to stop short of actually promising wealth or fame, though that interpretation does take a fair amount of reading between the lines. For example, his series is titled, “How I Became a Millionaire,” not “How To Become a Millionaire.” Likewise, in his Instagram video announcing the program, he describes the program’s goal as “help[ing] you accomplish your dreams” rather than outright promising or providing a concrete pathway to wealth.

Still, McBroom’s new program is similar in design to another program launched by Jake Paul last year. That $20 a month program, which is aimed at kids wanting to become influencers, has also faced criticism since its launch. In fact, BuzzFeed lauded it with such stunning reviews as, “frankly, it’s not great.”

See what others are saying: (Dexerto)

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Dave Chappelle Decides Against Having Former High School’s Theater Named After Him

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“The idea that my name will be turned into an instrument of someone else’s perceived oppression is untenable to me,” the comedian reportedly said.


Theater Named Announced

Comedian Dave Chappelle opted on Monday to not have the theater at his alma mater high school named after him, according to a report from The Washington Post

The Duke Ellington School of the Arts in Washington D.C. previously planned to name its theater in honor of Chappelle, as he is a distinct alum and donor. While Chappelle formerly said such a gesture would be “the most significant honor of [his] life,” he announced during Monday’s naming ceremony that it would bear a different title. 

The school’s theater will instead be called the Theater for Artistic Freedom and Expression. 

A naming ceremony was initially set to take place in November, but was postponed after the comedian began facing backlash for transphobic jokes in his Netflix special “The Closer.”

Among other things, he said he was “Team TERF,” which stands for trans-exclusionary radical feminist. He also made a joke about Caitlyn Jenner and remarks comparing the genitalia of transgender women to Beyond and Impossible meat.

The jokes embroiled Chappelle in controversy, and reports claimed that some students at Duke Ellington took issue with the comments. When Chappelle ended up visiting the school amid the scandal, Politico reported that one student told the comedian, “I’m 16 and I think you’re childish, you handled it like a child.”

Chappelle Defends Controversial Special 

According to The Post, Chappelle said the criticism against him “sincerely” hurt, but added that “the Ellington Family is my family.” He claimed he did not want the theater being named after him to distract students. 

“The idea that my name will be turned into an instrument of someone else’s perceived oppression is untenable to me,” he said according to Josh Rogin, a columnist for the outlet.

Rogin also tweeted that Chappelle took time out of the ceremony to slam the criticisms levied against him, accusing upset students of promoting someone else’s agenda. 

“These kids didn’t understand that they were instruments of oppression,” he reportedly said. 

“You cannot report on an artist’s work and remove artistic nuance,” Chappelle continued while denouncing the press coverage of his Netflix special. 

According to David Frum, a staff writer for The Atlantic who attended the ceremony, Chappelle suggested he was open to potentially adding his name to the theater at a later date when the community is ready. 

See what others are saying: (The Washington Post) (Variety) (The Atlantic)

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Chris Evans Says People Upset With Same-Gender “Lightyear” Kiss Are “Idiots”

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The kiss was previously removed from the film until a surge of backlash from Pixar employees prompted Disney to reinstate it. 


Chris Evans Supports “Lightyear” Scene

“Lightyear” star Chris Evans is standing against people who have criticized the same-gender kiss scene in the upcoming Pixar film. 

“The real truth is those people are idiots,” the actor told Reuters this week when discussing negative reactions to the scene’s inclusion. 

“The American story, the human story is one of constant social awakening and growth and that’s what makes us good,” he continued. 

Countries like Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Kuwait, Qatar, and more have banned the release of “Lightyear” over the kiss, which is between two women. Right-wing pundits in the U.S. have also slammed it, and user reviews for the picture on websites like IMDB have claimed that movie-going has “become an avenue for political propaganda.”

Evans argued those opinions are outdated. 

“There’s always going to be people who are afraid and unaware and trying to hold on to what was before. But those people die off like dinosaurs,” he said. “I think the goal is to pay them no mind, march forward and embrace the growth that makes us human.”

“Lightyear” hits theaters on Friday starring Evans as the titular Buzz Lightyear. Evans, however, is not playing the action figure made famous in the “Toy Story” movies and is instead playing an animated human astronaut who inspired the toy.

Kiss Scene Almost Never Made it to Big Screen

According to outlets that have reviewed the film, the same-gender kiss is between Alisha Hawthorne, a character voiced by Uzo Aduba, and her wife. 

Multiple reports have stated that Disney was always supportive of depicting a gay couple in the picture, but was more hesitant about showing an on-screen kiss between the two. The studio previously had the scene removed from the film until a swell of backlash prompted it to reinstate the kiss.

The decision came in March amid criticisms over Disney’s slow response to Florida’s controversial “Don’t Say Gay” bill. At the time, a group of Pixar employees wrote an open letter claiming that they have pushed for more inclusion in their films, but “nearly every moment of overtly gay affection is cut at Disney’s behest.” 

Now that the scene made the final cut of “Lightyear,” it has been a large topic of conversation leading up to the film’s release. On Monday, Evans told Variety that the inclusion of the scene makes him “happy,” but he hopes one day, scenes like this will be considered standard. 

“It’s tough to not be a little frustrated that it even has to be a topic of discussion,” he said. “That it is this kind of ‘news.’ The goal is that we can get to a point where it is the norm, and that this doesn’t have to be some uncharted waters, that eventually this is just the way it is.”

See what others are saying (Reuters) (Variety) (IndieWire)

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YouTube Shorts Hits 1.5 Billion Monthly Logged-In Users 

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The company says the success of Shorts is bringing more viewers to its long-form content.


YouTube Shorts Reaches Milestone

Less than two years after its launch, YouTube Shorts is reaching 1.5 billion logged-in users every month, according to reports from TechCrunch and Variety on Wednesday.

YouTube launched its Shorts feature to compete with TikTok, the social media app that has taken over the internet with its bite-sized content. Its effort appears to be successful, as these new numbers put YouTube Shorts on track with the Gen Z-beloved app. 

In September 2021, TikTok announced it had reached one billion monthly users. It has not released updated data since, but analysts projected it could reach 1.5 billion sometime in 2022. 

While Shorts were created to rival the trending content on TikTok, YouTube has remained committed to the long-form content that has served as the platform’s bread and butter. In its announcement, the company touted that Shorts served as an entryway for viewers to watch more of this long-form content and discover new creators along the way. 

In a release, YouTube said the synergy built by this expansion has allowed for “the rise of the multiformat creator.”

“Long-form content remains the best way for creators to deeply engage and develop long-term relationships with their audiences,” Tara Walpert Levy, YouTube’s Vice President of the Americas, said in a statement. “But Shorts offer an exciting, new way to be a part of a viewer’s journey and to introduce themselves and their whole portfolio to new audiences. This approach is yielding real results; channels uploading both short and long-form content are seeing better overall watch time and subscriber growth than those uploading only one format.”

The Competition Posed by TikTok

For its part, YouTube put a lot of effort into making Shorts thrive on its platform. Among other measures, the company created a $100 million fund incentivizing creators to make the quick videos. 

The Google-owned video giant is far from the only social media company to try to wrestle with TikTok’s success. Facebook and Instagram began rolling out Reels two years ago while TikTok was experiencing a surge of pandemic users. 

In turn, TikTok has also made changes to its app to keep up with other social platforms. Recently, it extended its maximum video length to ten minutes, meaning its short-form content may not always be so short. 

By using short videos to drive more power behind longer content, YouTube is hoping to cover both bases. Neal Mohan, YouTube’s Chief Product Officer, said that even though the company is only at “the beginning” of its journey with Shorts, he knows “the product will continue to be an integral part of the YouTube experience moving forward.”

See what others are saying: (TechCrunch) (Variety) (The Verge)

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