Connect with us

U.S.

Viral Photo of Two Kids Using Taco Bell Wi-Fi for School Sparks Debate Over Digital Divide

Published

on

  • Last week, a photo of two school-age girls doing their schoolwork outside of a Taco Bell in Salinas, California, went viral.
  • While many assumed that the girls originally only lacked access to Wi-Fi, a GoFundMe campaign later revealed that their family was set to be kicked out of their home because they couldn’t afford to pay rent.
  • As of Tuesday, that fundraiser has garnered over $130,000, far-exceeding its original goal of $20,000.
  • The situation has also stimulated debate surrounding the “digital divide,” and how to address it. It is estimated that 30% of K-12 students across the country lack access to the internet or a device capable of accessing it in their homes. 

Taco Bell Schoolwork Photo Goes Viral

A viral photo of two students using a Taco Bell’s Wi-Fi to complete their schoolwork has led to renewed attention around the “digital divide” and how the ongoing pandemic is exacerbating it.

The photo was first posted to Instagram on Wednesday. It shows two young girls in Salinas, California, sitting on a curb with laptops in hand as two employees approach them, likely out of concern for their safety. 

“Two students sit outside a Taco Bell to use Wi-Fi so they can ‘go to school’ online,”  Former California Senate President pro Tempore, Kevin de León, said Friday after sharing the photo on Twitter. “This is California, home to Silicon Valley… but where the digital divide is as deep as ever. Where 40% of all Latinos don’t have internet access. This generation deserves better.”

In the comments under de León’s tweet, a surge of people expressed interest in helping to provide a Wi-Fi router for the girls; however, some were concerned that the image might actually depict a form of child negligence. 

In fact, that photo attracted so much attention that it reportedly led to a welfare check, with Child Protective Services investigating the girls’ family for any potential child neglect or abuse. Ultimately, that investigation did not uncover any neglect. 

Over $130K Raised for the Girls’ Family

As more people reached out to help the girls in the photo, it was learned that their family didn’t just lack access to Wi-Fi at home. They were actually in danger of becoming homeless because their mother couldn’t afford to pay rent. 

Many of the details around the girls’ family have come from a woman named Jackie Lopez, who created a GoFundMe page for the family. Lopez said she originally wanted to start the fundraiser because these “dedicated little girls… didn’t want to miss out on learning due to the fact that they didn’t have internet access at home.”

On the fundraiser page, Lopez said the story touched her and that she made it her mission to locate the family, which she later did. 

According to Lopez, the girls’ mother, Juana, is a single mother and an essential field worker who picks berries. On her days off, Juana sells flowers on the side of the road. Lopez said Juana “doesn’t take a day off because that is a day she could be making a few dollars to provide for her girls.” 

“Upon meeting them and wanting to know what I can do to help, she started to open up to me,” Lopez said of Juana. “I asked her if I could get her girls a desk for distant learning and she mentioned there was no space in their home for that. She then said she shared a small bedroom with her 3 girls in the home she was living in. The same room she was going to be evicted from 3 days later on the 1st of September.” 

Lopez noted that Juana had been searching for a new home but had been unable to find one. 

After reaching out to her followers on Instagram, Lopez said she has been able to provide Juana’s daughters with items such as clothes, shoes, school supplies, essentials, and food. Additionally, Lopez said that support allowed her to buy the family a hotel room for a week while she and others help Juana search for a more permanent home.

The original goal of the fundraiser was set at $20,000. As of Tuesday, it’s raised that more than six times its goal, sitting at more than $130,000.

In an update on Monday, Lopez said that Juana has been set up with a new accountant to help manage her funds.

“The girls deserve it all and my heart is just filled with so much joy for this family,” Lopez said. “I can’t thank you all enough for making so many of their dreams a reality.”

In addition to that money, the school district Jauna’s daughters go to has also put out a statement saying it has now provided the family with a hotspot. 

Taco Bell Incident Highlights “Digital Divide”

While Juana’s family received an exceptional level of support, for many students and their families, this isn’t the case. Many will never go viral and will continue to struggle. 

According to a June study from Common Sense Media and the Boston Consulting Group, “15 to 16 million public school students across the United States live in households without adequate internet access or computing devices to facilitate distance learning.”

That’s 30% of all K-12 public school students. 

But not everyone is affected equally by the “digital divide.” It’s most pronounced in rural communities and households with Black, Latinx, and Native American students.

Southern states also have some of the largest K-12 divides within the country, with Mississippi, Louisiana, Arkansas, and Alabama showing the largest deficit by proportion. Other states like Texas, California, and Florida all have the largest gaps by population. Still, the report stresses that the “digital divide” is a problem in all 50 states.

Many of those concerns have been highlighted with the story of Juana’s daughters. 

“California is the technology capital of the world,” Monterey County Supervisor Luis Alejo told CNN. “This is an embarrassment.”

Alejo added that the embarrassment is compounded by the fact that Salinas is only 45 minutes away from Silicon Valley, a global hub of technology and wealth. 

“…we have such a huge divide that’s gone on for years, but now, it’s only amplified because of this pandemic,” Alejo said. 

“We know that there [are] thousands of other kids in a similar situation… there’s a lot of homes and a lot parents who don’t even know how to use computers or how hotspots work.”

See what others are saying: (KSBW 8) (Fox News) (CNN)

U.S.

Ohio Will Give 5 People $1 Million for Getting Vaccinated

Published

on

  • Ohio is launching a lottery program that will give five people ages 18 or older $1 million each if they receive at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine.
  • Five vaccinated people between 12 and 17 years old will win full four-year scholarships to one of the state’s public universities under a similar giveaway program. 
  • Some have criticized the move as a waste and misuse of federal coronavirus relief funds, but others applauded it as a strong effort to boost slumping vaccination rates.
  • Gov. Mike DeWine (R) addressed critics on Twitter, writing, “The real waste at this point in the pandemic — when the vaccine is readily available to anyone who wants it — is a life lost to COVID-19.”

Ohio Announces Vaccine Lottery

Several states and cities across the country have been rolling out different incentives to help boost COVID-19 vaccination rates. Some are offering $100 savings bonds, $50 prepaid cards, and even free alcohol, but Ohio’s Republican Gov. Mike DeWine took it a step further Wednesday, saying that five people in his state will each win $1 million for getting vaccinated.

DeWine said that the lottery program, named “Ohio Vax-a-Million,” will be open to residents 18 and older who receive at least one dose. Drawings start May 26 and winners will be pulled from the state’s voter registration database.

The Ohio Lottery will conduct the drawings, but the money will come from existing federal coronavirus relief funds.

Younger people will also have a chance to win something. That’s because DeWine said five vaccinated people between 12 and 17 years old will be eligible to win a full four-year scholarship to one of the state’s public universities under a similar lottery program. The portal to sign up for that opens May 18.

DeWine Defends Lottery

Reactions to the giveaway have been mixed. Some echoed statements from State Rep. Emilia Sykes, the top House Democrat, who said, “Using millions of dollars in relief funds in a drawing is a grave misuse of money that could be going to respond to this ongoing crisis.”

DeWine, however, seems to have anticipated pushback like this.

“I know that some may say, ‘DeWine, you’re crazy! This million-dollar drawing idea of yours is a waste of money,'” he tweeted. “But truly, the real waste at this point in the pandemic — when the vaccine is readily available to anyone who wants it — is a life lost to COVID-19.”

Despite some backlash, a ton of other people have applauded the plan as a smart way to encourage vaccinations across all age groups. So far, about 36%of Ohio’s population has been fully vaccinated — compared with 35% nationally. 

Still, the number of people seeking vaccines has dropped in recent weeks, with an average of about 16,500 starting the process last week, which is down from figures above 80,000 in April. 

See what others are saying: (AP News) (NPR)(The New York Times)

Continue Reading

U.S.

Derek Chauvin Qualifies for Longer Sentence Over George Floyd’s Murder, Judge Rules

Published

on

  • A judge overseeing the trial of Derek Chauvin ruled Wednesday that there were enough aggravating factors in the former officer’s murder of George Floyd that could qualify him for a longer prison sentence.
  • While Chauvin was found guilty on all three charges he faced, Minnesota state law only allows him to receive prison time for the most serious charge of second-degree homicide, which has a max sentence of 40 years but a recommended sentence of 12.5 years for people with no criminal history.
  • The judge ultimately agreed that Chauvin qualifies for longer sentencing because prosecutors had proven that he abused his power as a police officer, acted “particularly cruel” to Floyd, and committed the crime in front of children with at least three other people.
  • Chauvin is currently scheduled to be sentenced on June 25.

Judge Cahill Rules on Aggravating Factors

Hennepin County District Judge Peter Cahill, who oversaw the murder trial of Derek Chauvin, has ruled that there were aggravating factors in the former Minneapolis police officer’s murder of George Floyd, thus qualifying him for a longer sentence.

While the jury found Chauvin guilty on all three charges he was facing, Minnesota law says that he will only face sentencing for the most serious charge, which in this case is second-degree murder.

That charge carries a maximum sentence of 40 years, but state sentencing guidelines recommend 12 and a half years for someone with no criminal history. Prosecutors asked Judge Cahill for what’s called an “upward sentencing departure,” arguing that there were five factors that should open Chauvin up to a maximum sentence.

In a ruling made public Wednesday, Cahill wrote that prosecutors had proved beyond a reasonable doubt four of those five factors.

In his decision, Cahill agreed with the prosecutor’s claim that Chauvin had “abused his position of trust and authority” as a police officer and that he “knew from his training and experience” that the neck restraint he used Floyd in “danger of positional asphyxia.” 

Cahill also supported the argument that the former officer had been “particularly cruel” to Floyd, who he wrote “was begging for his life and obviously terrified by the knowledge he was likely to die,” adding that Chauvin “remained indifferent to Mr. Floyd’s pleas.”

The third and fourth aggravating factors that the judge sided with prosecutors on were that Chauvin had committed the crime as part of a group of three or more people and that he perpetrated that crime in front of children.

Notably, Cahill did reject the fifth aggravating factor brought by prosecutors, who argued Floyd was “particularly vulnerable” because he was handcuffed and held facedown on the street. The judge said that prosecutors did not prove that argument, writing that Floyd had been able to resist arrest before he was put on the ground.

Additional Charges

The ruling comes just a few days after Chauvin and the three other officers were indicted on federal civil rights charges by a grand jury.

Chauvin was also indicted on a second, separate federal charge related to the arrest of a 14-year-old boy in September 2017, during which he allegedly held the boy by the neck and hit him with a flashlight repeatedly.

According to reports, if he is convicted, he would likely serve the federal sentence at the same time as his state one. However, the federal charges may impact the pending August trial of the three other officers, who have been charged with aiding and abetting murder and manslaughter.

Separately, last week, Chauvin’s defense attorney filed a motion for a new trial, alleging misconduct by the judge, prosecutors, and jurors, signaling additional continued litigation.

See what others are saying: (The Washington Post) (NPR) (CNN)

Continue Reading

U.S.

Teens Attack and Rob 80-Year-Old Asian Man in Northern California

Published

on

  • Viral surveillance footage shows an 80-year-old Asian man in the San Francisco Bay area being assaulted and robbed on Saturday by suspects who police say are teenagers.
  • Police believe the suspects are as young as 16, and at one point, one can be heard in the video giggling from the getaway car as the victim cries for help. 
  • The news comes after the nonprofit Stop AAPI Hate released data showing that reports of anti-Asian hate incidents in the U.S. jumped by almost 74% year-over-year in March.

Suspect Laughs at Victim During Attack

Surveillance video going viral on social media captured an 80-year-old Asian man in the San Francisco Bay area getting assaulted and robbed on Saturday by suspects who police believe are teenagers.

The full video is extremely distressing. It shows the man getting knocked to the ground, trying to fight off his attackers as he cries for help. To make matters worse, at one point, high-pitched giggles can be heard coming from another teen in the background. That person appears to be inside a getaway car nearby.

The victim was robbed of a watch and sustained minor injuries. Police have also said that a vehicle similar to the one used in this case was spotted at a strong-armed robbery in a nearby San Leandro area less than two hours later, where another victim was robbed of her purse.

Police believe the suspects are as young as 16.

Surge of Crimes Against Asians in U.S.

This is just the latest violent attack against an Asian person making headlines since the start of the coronavirus pandemic.

Last week, reports emerged regarding two Asian women who were attacked with a hammer in Times Square by someone demanding they remove their masks. Two other Asian women were recently stabbed while waiting for the bus in downtown San Francisco.

The San Francisco-based nonprofit Stop AAPI Hate released data Thursday saying that reports of anti-Asian hate incidents in the U.S. jumped by almost 74% year-over-year in March — with Chinese people as victims in 44% of these acts.

Vancouver Sees Massive Influx of Anti-Asian Hate

While anti-Asian hate crimes have surged in the U.S., the situation may be worse in Canada, specifically in Vancouver. Around 42% of people in Vancouver are of Asian descent and at least 25% speak Chinese — making it the most heavily Asian city in North America.

Still, it witnessed a 717% year-over-year surge in anti-Asian hate crimes in 2020, according to the Vancouver Police Department. Bloomberg even dubbed it the Anti-Asian hate crime capital of North America, saying more anti-Asian hate crimes were reported in the city of 700,000 people last year than in the 10 largest U.S. cities combined.

That’s part of why people all across the city are participating in more organized action to speak out against anti-Asian hate. For instance, several rallies took place in Vancouver Monday to mark the National Day of Action Against Anti-Asian Racism.

See what others are saying: (ABC 7) (Bloomberg) (Forbes)

Continue Reading