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Health Workers Post Bikini and Alcohol Selfies, Slamming Study on Their Social Media Use as “Sexist”

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  • A paper in the Journal of Vascular Surgery has come under fire for suggesting it is unprofessional for health workers to post swimwear photos and photos with alcohol to social media.
  • The study—which was conducted by three men using fake accounts on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram—has been criticized as “sexist.” Some have also even equated the methods to cyberstalking.
  • The authors of the study later asked for their own paper to be retracted amid backlash, and the journal has since issued that retraction.
  • Even after it was retracted, many argued that on top of the sexism, people should also take issue with the fact that the study listed discussing topics like abortion and gun control as unprofessional.

Journal Study Follows Health Professionals’ Posts

It’s no secret that many people worry about how their social media accounts may affect their job, but now, many health professionals are challenging those norms after a controversial study suggested that posting photos in a bikini is unprofessional.

That study—“Prevalence of unprofessional social media content among young vascular surgeons”—targeted 480 surgeons and found social media accounts for 235 of them. Researchers with the study then tracked the posts of those doctors in an attempt to find “either clearly unprofessional or potentially unprofessional content.” 

In all, researchers said they found at least potentially unprofessional content in around a quarter of those 235 accounts.

But what researchers constituted as unprofessional ranged widely. For example, “offensive comments about colleagues/work/patients” or posts where the surgeons appeared to be drunk were deemed clearly unprofessional.

However, much more controversially, the researchers also included the display of any form of alcohol—even if just a glass of wine at a restaurant—in the potentially unprofessional category. They also included “inappropriate attire,” such as “pictures in underwear, provocative Halloween costumes, and provocative posing in bikinis/swimwear.”

Source: Journal of Vascular Surgery, retracted

The study was originally conducted in January and February 2018. It was then published online in December 2019, but it largely flew under the radar until it was published in the journal’s August 2020 edition. 

According to the authors, the goal of this paper was to: “evaluate the extent of unprofessional social media content among recent vascular surgery fellows and residents.”

That’s because “it has been demonstrated that publicly available social media content may affect patient choice of physician, hospital, and medical facility.”

To conduct the study, three “screeners” created fake accounts on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter to track the surgeons. Notably, all three screeners were men, ranging from ages 28 to 37.

In its conclusion, the study warns that “young surgeons should be aware of the permanent public exposure of unprofessional content that can be accessed by peers, patients, and current/future employers.”

It also notes that neither men nor women were more likely to post unprofessional content. 

Outrage From Medical Professionals

The study has received near-universal backlash from health professionals online, with many reiterating that the targeted accounts were all viewed by men using fake accounts of their own. 

“They are shaming our women physician colleagues for wearing bikinis,” Mudit Chowdhary, a radiation oncology chief resident physician, said on Twitter.

Alongside that, many health professionals accused the study of employing cyberstalking tactics in its methods.

Most notably, many female medical professionals responded by using #MedBikini on social media, where they posted so-called “unprofessional” photos of themselves in bikinis.

“I am a woman in medicine who loves to travel to tropical locations and dress accordingly. I will not wear my white coat and scrubs to Hawaii,” one third year medical student said on Twitter. “This does not make me unprofessional or less intelligent or compassionate compared to my male colleagues.”

Many others also took a moment to criticize the notion that posting a photo next to or holding a glass of alcohol is unprofessional.

“Here I am from a social media post last summer… being inappropriate & enjoying my sangria,” Pediatric Pain Psychologist Christine Sieberg said.

Authors Ask to Retract Study

The backlash was so strong that by Friday, the authors of the study called for their own paper to be retracted. 

“Our intent was to empower surgeons to be aware and then personally decide what may be easily available for patients and colleagues to see about us,” One of the authors, Thomas Cheng, said in an apology on Twitter.

“However, this was not the result. We realize that the definition of professionalism is rapidly changing in medicine and that we need to support trainees and surgeons as our society changes.”

“Also, we realize that our design had significant gender bias, particularly with men assessing the appropriateness of women’s clothing.”

“We were wrong not to have considered the inherent gender bias and have certainly learned from this experience. We will do better in the future and teach others from our experience.”

A spokesperson for the Boston Medical Center—where six of the seven authors have ties—also called the paper “ill-conceived” and “poorly executed,” saying it “reinforces biases about professionalism and gender.” 

Following that, the journal issued a statement retracting the article and apologizing for unconscious bias.

Criticism Against Paper’s View on Political Issues

Even after the study was retracted, some health professionals expressed additional concern. That’s because while the focus on sexism was the main narrative of the outrage, they worried that another controversial line in the article was being glossed over.

Specifically, the authors of the study flagged politically-charged issues such as abortion and gun control as being potentially unprofessional topics, labelling them “controversial social comments.”

“While people were rightfully incensed about the sexism inherent in saying posing in swimwear and provocative clothing was unprofessional,” medical student Stephanie Quainoo said, “little attention was paid to the fact that metrics included under potentially unprofessional behavior included: controversial political comments, controversial social topics and controversial religious comments.” 

“Professionalism is often used to police the speech of trainees and professionals, to quiet dissenting opinions, and protect the images of institutions when they are called out for wrongdoing,” she added.

Some have also made sure to note that both gun control and abortion are healthcare issues.

See what others are saying: (The Boston Globe) (CNN) (Daily Dot)

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Derek Chauvin and 3 Others Ex-Officers Indicted on Civil Rights Charges Over George Floyd’s Death

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  • The Justice Department filed federal criminal charges Friday against Derek Chauvin and three other former Minneapolis police officers after a grand jury indicted them for violating the civil rights of George Floyd.
  • The indictment charges Chauvin, J. Alexander Kueng, and Tou Thao for violating Floyd’s right to be free from unreasonable seizure and unreasonable force. All three, as well as Thomas Lane, were also charged with failing to provide medical care to Floyd. 
  • Chauvin was additionally hit with two counts in a separate indictment, which claims he violated the civil rights of a 14-year-old boy who he allegedly held by the neck and repeatedly beat with a flashlight during a 2017 arrest.
  • Chauvin was already convicted last month of murder and manslaughter over Floyd’s death, which Kueng, Lane, and Thao were previously charged for allegedly aiding and abetting.

Former Minneapolis Officers Hit With Federal Charges

A federal grand jury indicted Derek Chauvin and three other former Minneapolis police officers for violating George Floyd’s civil rights during the arrest that lead to his death last summer, the Justice Department announced Friday.

Chauvin, specifically, was charged with violating Floyd’s right to be free from unreasonable seizure and unreasonable force by a police officer. Ex-officers J. Alexander Kueng and Tou Thao were indicted for willfully failing to intervene in Chauvin’s unreasonable use of force.

All three men, as well as former officer Thomas Lane, face charges for failing to provide medical care to Floyd, “thereby acting with deliberate indifference to a substantial risk of harm to Floyd,” according to the indictment.

In a second, separate indictment, Chauvin was hit with two counts of civil rights violations related to the arrest of a 14-year-old boy in September 2017. During that incident, Chauvin allegedly held the boy by the neck and hit him with a flashlight repeatedly.

The announcement, which follows a months-long investigation by the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division, comes just over two weeks after Chauvin was found guilty of three state charges of murder and manslaughter in Floyd’s death.

He is currently awaiting his June 25 sentencing in a maximum-security prison.

State-Level Charges

Kueng, Lane, and Thao all face state charges of aiding and abetting second-degree murder and manslaughter.

Kueng and Lane were the first officers to responded to a call from a convenience store employee who claimed that Floyd used a counterfeit $20 bill. Body camera footage showed Floyd sitting in the car and Lane drawing his gun as the officers ordered him out and handcuffed him. 

Floyd can be heard pleading with the officers not to shoot him.

Shortly after, Chauvin and Thao arrived, and the footage shows Chauvin joining the other officers in their attempt to put Floyd into the back of a police car. In the struggle, the officers forced Floyd to the ground, with Chauvin kneeling on his neck while Kueng and Lane held his back and legs. 

Meanwhile, in cellphone footage taken at the scene, Thao can be seen ordering bystanders to stay away, and later preventing a Minneapolis firefighter from giving Floyd medical aid.

Their trial is set to begin in late August, and all three are free on bond. The new federal charges, however, will likely be more difficult to prove.

According to legal experts, prosecutors will have to show beyond reasonable doubt that the officers knew that they were depriving Floyd of his constitutional rights but continued to do so anyway.

The high legal standard is also hard to establish, as officers can easily claim they acted out of fear or even poor judgment.

See what others are saying: (The Washington Post) (The New York Times) (The Associated Press)

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Caitlyn Jenner Says Her Friends Are Fleeing California Because of the Homeless Population

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  • California gubernatorial candidate Caitlyn Jenner sparked outrage after an interview with Sean Hannity on Wednesday that was filmed from her Malibu airplane hangar. 
  • “My friends are leaving California,” she said. “My hangar, the guy right across, he was packing up his hangar and I said, ‘Where are you going?’ And he says, ‘I’m moving to Sedona, Arizona. I can’t take it anymore. I can’t walk down the streets and see the homeless.’”
  • Many criticized Jenner for sounding out of touch and unsympathetic to real issues in California and suggested that she prioritize helping the homeless population rather than incredibly wealthy state residents.

Caitlyn Jenner’s Remarks

California gubernatorial candidate Caitlyn Jenner sparked outrage on Wednesday after suggesting that wealthy people are fleeing the state because of its homeless population.

Jenner sat down for an interview in her Malibu airplane hangar with Fox News’ Sean Hannity. Jenner is one of the handful of Republicans aiming to unseat current Governor Gavin Newsom in a recall election in the fall. While polls show that most Californians do not support recalling Newsom, the conservative-led movement to do so gained enough signatures to land on the ballot.

“My friends are leaving California,” Jenner claimed during the interview. “My hangar, the guy right across, he was packing up his hangar and I said, ‘where are you going?’ And he says, ‘I’m moving to Sedona, Arizona, I can’t take it anymore. I can’t walk down the streets and see the homeless.’” 

“I don’t want to leave,” she continued. “Either I stay and fight, or I get out of here.”

Jenner’s Remarks Prompt Backlash

Her remarks were criticized online by people who thought Jenner sounded unsympathetic and out of touch to the real issues in the state. Many found it hypocritical that Jenner has slammed Newsom for being elite but was so concerned for wealthy people who don’t like having to see unhoused residents on the street.

Rep. Ted Lieu (D-Ca.) called Jenner out on Twitter for seemingly fighting for a small percentage of Californians. 

Unlike you, Dems are focused on the 99% of people who don’t own planes or hangars,” he wrote. “And you know what’s going to help reduce homelessness? The #AmericanRescuePlan, which your party opposed.”

Others suggested she prioritize directly addressing the homeless situation.

“If you don’t like the homeless situation, instead of hiding in your PRIVATE PLANE HANGAR, your campaign should be about helping them,” actress Merrin Dungey said. “They don’t like their situation either. Your lifelong privilege is showing. It’s not a good color.”

Jenner, an Olympic gold medalist and reality star, is one of the most prominent transgender Americans. Because homelessness is such a common issue within the trans community, some were frustrated she was not using her campaign to fix the situation, and rather used it to complain about how it impacted her wealthy friends. 

See what others are saying: (The Hill) (Politico) (Washington Post)

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Derek Chauvin Seeks New Trial In George Floyd Murder Case

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  • A lawyer for Derek Chauvin, the former Minneapolis police officer who was convicted of murdering George Floyd, filed a motion Tuesday for a new trial.
  • Among other complaints about Chauvin’s conviction, the attorney cited “prosecutorial and jury misconduct; errors of law at trial; and a verdict that is contrary to law.”
  • He also claimed the court “abused its discretion” by not granting a change of venue or sequestering the jury for the duration of the trial, arguing that publicity before and during it threatened its fairness. 
  • John Stiles, deputy chief of staff for Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison, told CNN, “The court has already rejected many of these arguments and the State will vigorously oppose them.”

Derek Chauvin’s Attorney Files Motion for New Trial

Former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin is officially asking for a new trial, hoping to overturn his conviction for the murder of George Floyd.

His attorney, Eric Nelson, filed court paperwork Tuesday laying out a number of errors he believes were made during Chauvin’s legal proceedings that violated his constitutional rights to due process and a fair trial. Nelson cited alleged issues, including, “prosecutorial and jury misconduct; errors of law at trial; and a verdict that is contrary to law.”

The filing did not cite any specific examples of jury misconduct, but Nelson also argued that the court “abused its discretion” by not granting a change of venue or sequestering the jury for the duration of the trial.

The court proceedings took place in the same city where Floyd was killed and where protesters drew national attention by calling for justice in his name. As a result, Nelson claimed that publicity before and during the trial threatened its fairness. He also argued that a defense expert witness was intimidated after he testified, but before the jury deliberated.

His filing asks for a hearing to impeach the guilty verdict, in part, on the grounds that the 12 jurors “felt threatened or intimidated, felt race-based pressure during the proceedings, and/or failed to adhere to instructions during deliberations.”

It’s unclear exactly what will come of this request, but John Stiles, deputy chief of staff for Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison, told CNN, “The court has already rejected many of these arguments and the State will vigorously oppose them.”

For instance, a judge previously denied Chauvin’s request to move the trial in March, saying, “I don’t think there’s any place in the state of Minnesota that has not been subjected to extreme amounts of publicity on this case.”

See what others are saying: (CNN) (NPR) (CBS)

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