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The Federal Eviction Moratorium is Set to End Today. Here’s What You Need to Know

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  • The federal eviction moratorium, which protects around 12 million renters from being evicted, is set to expire at midnight Friday.
  • The moratorium was signed into law under the CARES Act, and while the House extended the protections under a $3 trillion coronavirus relief bill passed in May, Senate Republicans have not been able to agree to any further legislation leading up to several key deadlines.
  • Now, millions of people will be forced to pay months of unpaid rent or risk being evicted.
  • Here’s what you need to know about the federal eviction ban ending, what it might mean for you, and what resources are out there for those impacted.

Federal Moratorium

As coronavirus cases continue to spike and renewed closures slow the already faltering U.S. economy, the federal protections that have prevented an estimated 12 million Americans from being evicted by their landlords are set to expire at midnight on Friday.

The eviction moratorium, which was signed into law in March as part of the $2 trillion CARES Act, protected nearly a third of U.S. renters who are residents of buildings and homes with federal mortgages.

Here’s what you need to know about the ending eviction prohibition, and what it means for renters.

What Happen’s When the Moratorium Ends?

Under the moratorium, landlords were prohibited from evicting tenants, but any unpaid rent continued to accumulate. With the eviction ban ending, millions of renters will now be forced to pay months of delayed rent or risk losing their homes during a pandemic and at a time when many are already struggling financially. 

A recent U.S. census survey found that 23.7 million Americans—or one in three renters—had little or no confidence that they could pay next month’s rent. More than half of those people also said they had not paid their most recent month’s rent.

To make matters worse, the additional $600 a week in federal unemployment benefits that have helped millions of Americans make ends meet in the face of mass layoffs are set to expire by the end of next week.

In May, the House passed a $3 trillion coronavirus relief bill that would extend the benefits until next year, but in addition to declaring the bill dead on arrival, Senate Republicans have also said that the benefits must be much lower.

How low, however, has become one of several points of contention within the Republican Party, which is currently struggling to agree on the provisions for a last-minute coronavirus relief bill. For months, the party refused to take up any legislation on the matter, preferring instead to wait until they were closer to the deadlines outlined under the CARES Act.

Now that they are down to the wire to pass a bill before those deadlines expire, negotiations within the Republican Paty have been stalled due to divisions between the Senate GOP and the White House.

As a result, experts now say that both the delayed legislation and the cut in benefits could speed up potential evictions.

“We know renters have been struggling to pay their rent,” Samantha Batko, senior research associate at the Urban Institute told The Hill. “They’re generally lower incomes, have less assets to draw on, and work in industries that are subject to job loss.” 

However, renters will still have a little time once the moratorium does end. 

Landlords are still required to give renters 30 days’ notice before they can file an eviction complaint in court, meaning that even though the ban ends Friday, eviction paperwork will not be filed until late August. That could potentially give Congress more time to come up with a plan.

Will Every Renter Be Affected?

As noted before, the federal moratorium only applied to those who rent in buildings with a mortgage that has government backing. Additionally, some renters will still be protected under state and local eviction moratoriums. Under certain types of bans, landlords are also prevented from charging late fees or penalties.

To find out if your state has any policies protecting renters, you can go to this page set up by Princeton University’s Eviction Lab, or this map by ProPublica.

While many of those moratoriums are not set to expire until August or September, some have already expired. According to the Eviction Lab, after local moratoriums expired, eviction filings went back to pre-pandemic levels almost immediately.

Unless both federal and local bans are extended, even more renters will face eviction in the coming months, according to an analysis by the Eviction Defense Project. The group found that of the 110 million Americans living in rental households, 20% are at risk of eviction by Sept. 30. Black and Hispanic renters are expected to be impacted the hardest.

What Can I Do If I Can’t Pay Rent? 

If you are impacted by the federal ban ending and cannot pay your rent, experts suggest the first thing you do is tell your landlord and try to come up with a deal.

“A lot of landlords are willing to work with people in this situation. They would rather keep a tenant who can pay less than try to get someone new in,” Shamus Roller, executive director of the National Housing Law Project told the Washington Post.

Bob Pinnegar, the chief executive of the National Apartment Association, also told the Post that some property managers are providing help for their tenants, like waiving late fees.

Some states and cities have also created rent assistance programs to help people make up missed payments.

The National Low Income Housing Coalition has been tracking local rent relief programs on this page, where you can see if your state or city has any programs you can apply for.

If you want to look at some additional resources, the Department of Housing and Urban Development, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, and mortgage loan company Fannie Mae have also set up pages with information for renters. 

What Can I do If I’m Facing Eviction?

If you are facing eviction, you can seek the help of a legal-aid attorney, many of whom will assist you for free or a small fee. To find a legal-aid attorney, you can go to LawHelp.org or look up online resources and local housing rights groups in your area.

In addition to helping you navigate the confusing legal process, which varies by state, city, and even courthouse, a legal-aid attorney can also help you determine if your landlord is violating any federal programs by evicting you.

For example, earlier in the pandemic, the Federal Housing Finance Agency allowed property owners with mortgages backed by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac to temporarily skip some payments. As a result, landlords who have been able to skip paying their mortgages were barred from evicting renters or charging late fees while receiving that assistance. 

The Legal Aid Justice Center has also created a page with resources in both Spanish and English regarding dealing with evictions during the pandemic.

Will Congress Do More to Help Address the Issue?

While Republican infighting continues to stall a much-needed coronavirus relief bill, Senate Democrats have proposed several plans to help renters, including some that had initially been outlined in the House bill passed back in May.

“Forcing thousands of people out of their homes during a pandemic will make a public health crisis worse,” said Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Ma.), who, along with several other Democratic Senators, has been pushing for extending protections.

Among other things, the proposed legislation would expand the moratorium beyond the federal level and also extend it until next March. Notably, the plan would also mandate the creation of a rental assistance fund.

While Senate Republicans have broadly rejected the Democrat’s proposals, housing advocates have told reporters that they are hopeful Congress will act, because it is in their best interest to avoid a serious rental market crisis. 

See what others are saying: (The Washington Post) (The Hill) (Bloomberg)

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Bodycam Footage Shows Adam Toledo Wasn’t Holding Gun When an Officer Shot Him

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  • Chicago officials released body camera footage Thursday which showed that 13-year-old Adam Toledo, who was shot and killed by police last month, had put his hands up in the air right before the officer opened fire.
  • The graphic video showed the officer, who has now been identified as Eric Stillman, yelling at Adam to stop as he chases him through an alley.
  • The teenager obeyed and stopped by a fence, where he can be seen holding what appears to be a gun behind his back. Stillman ordered him to drop it, and then shot him a split second after Adam raised his empty hands in the air.
  • The footage prompted renewed outrage, protests, and calls for an investigation. A lawyer for the Toledo family called the killing “an assassination,” while Stillman’s lawyer defended the officer, and claimed he acted appropriately.

Officer Bodycam Footage Made Public

Body camera footage released by Chicago officials Thursday showed that Adam Toledo, a 13-year-old boy killed by police last month, had his hands up when he was fatally shot.

The footage, which was released as part of a report by the city’s Civilian Office of Police Accountability (COPA), showed officers chasing Adam, who was Latino, through an alley in the predominantly Latino neighborhood of Little Village during the early hours of March 29.

The officer ordered Adam to stop. The teenager complied and halted by the side of a fence, holding what looks like a gun in one of his hands behind his back. The policeman yelled at him to drop it and show his hands.

Adam turned and lifted his empty hands, and the officer fired his weapon, striking the teenager once in the chest. The policeman is then seen administering CPR and asking him, “You alright? Where you shot?” while blood poured out of his mouth.

The COPA report published Thursday also identified the officer who shot Adam as 34-year-old Eric Stillman, who is white, and whose lawyer said he had been put on administrative duties for 30 days.

Stillman’s lawyer also argued that the shooting was justified, as did John Catanzara, president of the Fraternal Order of Police.

“He was 100% right,” Catanzara said. “The offender still turned with a gun in his hand. This occurred in eight-tenths of a second.”

Renewed Backlash and Protests

Adeena Weiss Ortiz, an attorney obtained by Adam’s family, said they are looking into taking legal action against Stillman. 

“If you’re shooting an unarmed child with his arms in the air, it’s an assassination,” she said at a news conference Thursday. 

Ortiz acknowledged the bodycam footage did appear to show Adam holding something that “could be a gun,” but argued the video must be independently analyzed to confirm.

“It’s not relevant because he tossed the gun,” she said. “If he had a gun, he tossed it.”

The American Civil Liberties Union of Illinois also echoed Ortiz’s demands on Thursday, calling for a “complete and transparent” investigation.

“The video released today shows that police shot Adam Toledo even though his hands were raised in the air,” said Colleen Connell, executive director of the ACLU of Illinois.

“The people of Chicago deserve answers about the events surrounding this tragic interaction. The anger and frustration expressed by many in viewing the video is understandable and cannot be ignored.”

Hours before the video was released, Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot pleaded for calm in the city, where anti-police protests have taken place in the weeks following the shooting.

“We must proceed with deep empathy and calm and importantly, peace,” she said. “No family should ever have a video broadcast widely of their child’s last moments, much less be placed in the terrible situation of losing their child in the first place.”

Some businesses in downtown Chicago boarded prepared for violence ahead of the video’s publication by boarding up their windows. City vehicles stood by to block traffic.

However, the demonstrations that took place Thursday were small, peaceful, and spread out over several parts of the city. Organizers said they plan to hold more protests Friday.

See what others are saying: (The Chicago Sun-Times) (The New York Times) (The Chicago Tribune)

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Eight Dead in Indianapolis Shooting

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  • Eight people were killed and several more were injured after a gunman opened fire at a FedEx Ground Facility in Indianapolis late Thursday.
  • The gunman took his life after opening fire. Authorities have not identified his motive yet. 
  • According to the Gun Violence Archive, in 2021, there have been 147 U.S. mass shootings, defined as verified incidents with four or more gunshot victims.
  • President Joe Biden released a statement calling gun violence “an epidemic in America,” adding, “We should not accept it. We must act.”

Eight Killed in Shooting

Eight people were killed and several others have been wounded after a gunman opened fire at a FedEx Ground Facility in Indianapolis late Thursday.

The gunman killed four people in the parking lot then four people inside before taking his own life, according to local officials. Authorities have identified the gunman and are searching his home, but have not disclosed any potential motives.

“There was no confrontation with anyone that was there,” Deputy Chief Craig McCartt of the Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department said during a press conference. “There was no disturbance, there was no argument. He just appeared to randomly start shooting.”

Several witnesses told local outlets they initially thought the gunshots were engines backfiring or another type of mechanical noise until they saw the gunman. Some said they heard him shouting indistinctly before opening fire. The investigation is still in very early stages and victims have not yet been identified. 

The facility employs 4,500 team members. It is unclear how many were working at the time of the shooting. FedEx released a statement expressing its condolences to the victims and their families. 

“We are deeply shocked and saddened by the loss of our team members following the tragic shooting at our FedEx Ground facility in Indianapolis,” the statement read. “Our most heartfelt sympathies are with all those affected by this senseless act of violence. The safety of our team members is our top priority, and we are fully cooperating with investigating authorities.”

Gun Violence in the U.S.

This tragedy follows a recent string of mass shootings in the U.S., including in Atlanta, Colorado, Southern California, and Texas. According to the Associated Press, this is at least the third in Indianapolis this year. 

The Gun Violence Archive has logged a total of 147 mass shootings in the U.S. so far in 2021. The organization defines mass shootings as reported and verified incidents with at least four gunshot victims.

Several politicians have released statements about the shooting, including Vice President Kamala Harris, who said this pattern “must end.”

“Yet again we have families in our country that are grieving the loss of their family members because of gun violence,” she said. “There is no question that this violence must end, and we are thinking of the families that lost their loved ones.”

President Joe Biden also released a statement saying that, “Too many Americans are dying every single day from gun violence. It stains our character and pierces the very soul of our nation.”

“Gun violence is an epidemic in America,” Biden added. “But we should not accept it. We must act.”

Indianapolis Mayor Joe Hogsett echoed those remarks in a news conference. 

“The scourge of gun violence that has killed far too many in our community and in our country,” he said.

“Our prayers are with the families of those whose lives were cut short,” he added on Twitter. 

Hogsett is among 150 U.S. mayors who recently signed a letter asking the Senate to take up gun legislation, including expanding background checks.

Editor’s Note: At Rogue Rocket, we make it a point to not include the names and pictures of mass murders or suspected mass murderers who may have been seeking attention or infamy. Therefore, we will not be linking to other sources, as they may contain these details.

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Soldier Charged With Assault After Shoving Black Man in Viral Video

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  • Authorities charged Army soldier Jonathan Pentland with third-degree assault and battery on Wednesday after a viral video showed him shoving a Black man while yelling at him to leave a South Carolina neighborhood.
  • Many people, including dozens who protested outside Pentland’s home this week, condemned the confrontation as another instance of someone being attacked for “walking while Black.”
  • Pentland and others claimed the unidentified man was picking a fight with neighbors, which the man denied, but police said nothing that may have happened earlier justified Pentland’s actions.
  • If convicted, Pentland faces a $500 fine and 30 days in jail.

Viral Video

A U.S. soldier was charged with assault on Wednesday after a video that circulated online showed him yelling at and shoving a Black man in a South Carolina neighborhood.

Footage of the April 8 incident was posted to social media Monday. It shows the Army soldier, Jonathan Pentland, confronting the unidentified man and telling him to leave the neighborhood. 

The other man explains that he’s just walking through the area and doing nothing wrong, but Pentland becomes increasingly aggressive. “You better walk away,” he shouts at the man after shoving him.

“You either walk away, or I’m gonna carry your ass out of here,” he continues before adding, “You’re in the wrong neighborhood motherf*ker. Get out!”

The man then tries to tell Pentland that he lives in the neighborhood, and Pentland then asks for his address, which he does not give.

The confrontation continues with Pentland cursing and getting in the man’s face. As he does so, the man says that Pentland smells drunk. 

It’s unclear what exactly led up to the confrontation, but in the video, a woman off-camera says the man “picked a fight with some random young lady that’s one of our neighbors.”

“I don’t even know who she is. Nobody picked a fight when someone ran up on me,” the man replies. Another woman off-screen then encourages the man to leave with her, saying, “What’s your name? Come on. You don’t want no trouble.”

Video Triggers Protests Outside Pentland’s Home

After this video spread online, many social media users condemned it as another instance of someone being attacked for “walking while Black.”

In fact, protesters even began demonstrating outside of Penland’s home. Those protests started off peaceful, but deputies were then called after 8 p.m. because unknown individuals vandalized the house. That forced police to shut down access to the area and remove Pentland’s family to another location.

As far as the viral video, deputies were told that the man approached “several neighbors in a threatening manner” and that someone had asked Pentland to “intervene.”

Police did confirm that there are two reports of alleged assault against the unnamed man Pentland shoved that are being investigated. However, they also added that the man has “an underlying medical condition that may explain the behavior exhibited in the alleged incidents.”

Pentland Charged

Either way, police said whatever happened earlier did not justify Pentland’s actions. He was ultimately arrested Wednesday morning and was charged with third-degree assault and battery. He faces a $500 fine and 30 days in jail if convicted.

“We’re not going to let people be bullies in our community,” Richland County Sheriff Leon Lott said at a news conference Wednesday. “And if you are, you’re going to answer for it, and that’s what we’ve done in this case.”

On top of that, the Justice Department reportedly was investigating. Pentland’s Commanding General even issued a statement condemning his behavior, adding that Pentland “brought disrespect to @fortjackson our Army and the trust with the public we serve.”

See what others are saying: (The Washington Post) (ABC News) (Huffpost)

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