Connect with us

U.S.

CDC Issues New Guidelines in Favor of Reopening Schools

Published

on

  • The CDC announced new guidelines on Thursday that heavily push for schools to reopen, citing the importance a school has on a child’s health and well being.
  • The CDC gives multiple reasons for the recommendation, notably that children are believed to be at low-risk of catching and spreading COVID-19.
  • The announcement comes at a time when the Trump Administration has threatened to withhold federal funding from school districts that refuse to allow in-person classes.
  • Despite the threat and CDC guidelines, some of the nation’s largest school districts will still only offer online classes for the foreseeable future.

CDC Plans to Reopen Schools

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued guidelines Thursday that heavily encourage a quick reopening of schools.

The guidelines emphasize the importance of school in a child’s life, stating, “Aside from a child’s home, no other setting has more influence on a child’s health and well-being than their school.”

The move comes amid pressure from President Donald Trump, who has repeatedly said he was in favor of students returning to a classroom setting sooner rather than later.

Amid the coronavirus pandemic, there have been widespread concerns that reopening schools could lead to spikes in COVID-19 infection rates. The CDC preempted those concerns, writing, “The best available evidence indicates that COVID-19 poses relatively low risks to school-aged children. Children appear to be at lower risk for contracting COVID-19 compared to adults.”

The agency added that minors only account for 7% of all COVID-19 cases and less than 0.1% of related deaths. Regarding whether or not this relatively low infection and death rate could be because students have been isolated since March, the CDC states, “Scientific studies suggest that COVID-19 transmission among children in schools may be low. International studies that have assessed how readily COVID-19 spreads in schools also reveal low rates of transmission when community transmission is low.”

“Based on current data, the rate of infection among younger school children, and from students to teachers, has been low, especially if proper precautions are followed.  There have also been few reports of children being the primary source of COVID-19 transmission among family members.”

However, the agency does distance itself from any black and white statements, as they followed the prior statements with, “No studies are conclusive, but the available evidence provides reason to believe that in-person schooling is in the best interest of students…”

The Benefits of In-person Instruction

In general, the CDC pushed for students to go back to school not only because they believe the risk of infection is relatively low, but also because attending school has tangible benefits. To state the obvious, attending school means a better education for students. The agency emphasizes that “the need for in-person instruction is particularly important for students with heightened behavioral needs.”

Additionally, there are concerns that a lack of in-person instruction could mean that students experience an extended “summer-slide,” a well-documented phenomenon of students lacking skills they learned the year-prior by being out of the academic environment.

There were particular concerns for low-income students. The CDC notes that many students from low-income families often don’t have the infrastructure needed to facilitate at-home learning. For many, that includes a lack of consistent access to computers and stable internet. The guidelines point out, “Persistent achievement gaps that already existed before COVID-19, such as disparities across income levels and races, can worsen and cause serious, hard-to-repair damage to children’s education outcomes.”

The agency also notes that many families rely on schools to provide their children with proper nutritional needs. Over 30 million children are a part of the National School Lunch Program, while 15 million use the School Breakfast Program.

During the pandemic, schools have been providing many of these services to families; however, the agency claims the system is unlikely to be sustainable for the long-term, noting, “This is a particularly severe problem for the estimated 11 million food-insecure children, living in the United States.”

The new guidelines go on to list other reasons that the CDC justifies opening schools, including providing a safe environment for students who suffer from physical, emotional, psychological, or sexual abuse, physical fitness needs, and a way to provide economic relief to parents and caretakers.

For many parents around the U.S., there are conflicts between their work schedule and when they can watch their children. School normally provides that supervised environment that allows parents to work without needing to worry about the well-being of their child.

Many economists and lawmakers have concerns that even if the economy could begin to grow again, it may be hampered by the limited availability of workers from families who need to choose between working or watching their children

Pushback From Unions and Districts

For many, the CDC’s guidelines come as a shock, as the agency has been a large proponent of shutting down facilities and many aspects of society to try and slow the COVID-19 infection rate. Yet, the guidelines come a week after the President was criticized by Democratic lawmakers for not having a school reopening plan in place.

They also come at a tense moment between the Trump Administration and some of the largest school districts in the nation. Trump has threatened to pull federal funding from school districts that refuse to reopen for in-person instruction, saying that the funds could be better used by parents to choose to send their kids to charter or private schools.

Yet, not everyone is convinced that schools should reopen sooner rather than later. The American Federation of Teachers pushed back against reopening schools freely.

Local teacher union leaders, such as John McEntee from the Paterson Education Association in New Jersey, the states third largest teacher union, asked Gov. Phil Murphy (D) to hold off reopening schools.“Our union would suggest, at the moment, to set a target date of January and see where they are. If you can’t meet the target, that’s another conversation. Maybe you set another one for after spring break,” he explained to NJ Advance Media.

New Jersey, along with many other states, is opting to reopen schools under a hybrid model. Students will attend classes with modifications such as social distancing, while parents who are uncomfortable with this can opt to have their children continue their education through online instruction.

Other districts, notably New York City, are looking at only opening one to three days a week as a way to slowly reintroduce students to an in-person school environment.

Some of the largest school districts in the nation, like Los Angeles and San Diego, are currently looking at online instruction only until furhter notice.

See what others are saying: (NBC News) (CNN) (NYT Times)

U.S.

After Uvalde, Politicians, Public Figures, Gun Violence Survivors, and More Call For Change

Published

on

“When are we going to do something?” Golden State Warriors Coach Steve Kerr asked during an emotional plea at a press conference. 


Uvalde Shooting Kills 21 People

Democratic politicians, activists, and many others are calling for gun reform in the United States after 19 children and two teachers were killed in a Tuesday shooting at Robb Hill Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas.

The 18-year-old suspected gunman was reportedly killed by officers. The massacre marks the 27th school shooting of 2022, according to Education Week.

It also comes just a week and a half after 10 people were killed in a shooting in Buffalo, New York, and another shooting in a Southern California church left one person dead and several others injured.

Sen. Chris Murphy (D-Ct.) spoke fervently on the Senate floor Tuesday, slamming his colleagues for refusing to pass gun control legislation that could prevent future shootings. 

“What are we doing?” he asked of his fellow lawmakers. “Why do you spend all this time running for the United States Senate? Why do you through all the hassle of getting this job, of putting yourself in a position of authority, if your answer is, as the slaughter increases, as kids run for their lives, we do nothing? What are we doing? 

“Why are you here if not to solve a problem as existential as this?” he continued. “This isn’t inevitable. These kids weren’t unlucky. This only happens in this country.” 

“And it is a choice. It is our choice.”

President Joe Biden likewise urged action by supporting the now-expired assault weapons ban.

“We can do more. We must do more,” he added.

Public Figures And Shooting Survivors Speak Out

The demands for change spread far past political figures. Golden State Warriors coach Steve Kerr took time out of a pre-game press conference to passionately plead for common-sense gun control. He specifically called on Senators to vote on H.R. 8, a background check bill previously passed in the House.

“When are we going to do something?” Kerr asked while slamming his hands on the table.  

“I ask you, Mitch McConnell, I ask all of you senators who refuse to do anything about the violence and school shootings and supermarket shootings. I ask you: Are you going to put your own desire for power ahead of the lives of our children and our elderly and our churchgoers?” Kerr continued. “Because that’s what it looks like.” 

He went on to say that Americans, who largely support background checks, are “being held hostage by 50 Senators who refuse to even put it to a vote.” 

Grammy Award-winning musician Taylor Swift shared his message, adding that she is filled with “rage and grief” not just from the shootings, but by “the ways in which we, as a nation, have become conditioned to unfathomable and unbearable heartbreak.”

“It doesn’t have to be this way,” tweeted David Hogg, an activist and survivor of the 2018 school shooting in Parkland, Florida. “The way we will make this time different is by Americans on both sides of the aisle collaborating on what we can agree on to get something done even if small. Kids are dying we have to do something.”

Manuel Oliver, the father of one of the children lost in the Parkland shooting, slammed the inaction of politicians in an interview on CBS News

“The families don’t need your freaking hearts,” Oliver said. “They need their kids, and the kids are not there anymore. So I feel very angry and offended and I just don’t understand how come a whole society doesn’t wake up.” 

People impacted by the 2012 Sandy Hook shooting also spoke out, including Mary Ann Jacob, who worked as a librarian at the school during the shooting.

“I’m so sorry those deaths did not change our world,” Jacob wrote. 

Texas-based figures felt especially compelled to stand up as the tragedy hit so close to home. Academy Award-winning actor Matthew McConaughey, whose hometown is Uvalde, wrote a message on social media asking Americans to “take a longer and deeper look in the mirror and ask ourselves, ‘What is it that we truly value?’”

“We have tragically proven that we are failing to be responsible for the rights our freedoms grant us,” McConaughey wrote. 

“Action must be taken so that no parent has to experience what the parents in Uvalde and the others before them have endured.”

Fellow Texas native Selena Gomez also took to social media to argue for action.

“If children aren’t safe at school where are they safe? It’s so frustrating and I’m not sure what to say anymore,” the “Only Murders in the Building” star wrote on her Instagram story. “Those in power need to stop giving lip service and actually change the laws to prevent these shootings in the future.”

We make it a point to not include the names and pictures of those who may have been seeking attention or infamy and will not link out to websites that might contain such information.

Continue Reading

U.S.

Lawmakers Call For Action as Oil Companies Post Record Profits Amid Rising Gas Prices

Published

on

A recent analysis from the Center for American Progress found that the top five oil companies earned over 300% more in profits during the first quarter of 2022 than the same period last year.


As Consumer Prices Climb, Big Oil Profits

American oil companies are facing increased scrutiny over profiteering practices as gas prices continue to surpass record highs driven by Russia’s ongoing war in Ukraine.

Last week, costs surged to above $4 per gallon in all 50 states for the first time ever, according to the auto club AAA. Prices are currently averaging over $4.59 per gallon nationwide, which is 50% higher than they were this time last year.

In addition to consumers hurting at the pump, there are also rising concerns for industries that rely on fuel and oil like trucking, freight, airlines, and plastic manufacturers. 

To account for high prices, some in sectors have responded by ramping up prices further down the supply chain to account for costs, putting even more of a burden on consumers to pay for everyday items.

But as Americans struggle with sky-high gas prices at a time of record inflation, recently released earnings reports show that many of the world’s largest oil companies thrived in the first quarter of 2022.

ExxonMobil more than doubled its earnings from the same period last year, reporting a net profit of $5.5 billion. Meanwhile, Chevron logged its best quarterly earnings in almost a decade, and Shell had its highest earnings ever.

According to a new analysis conducted by the Center for American Progress, the top five oil companies — including the three mentioned above —  earned over 300% more in profits this quarter than during the same time last year.

“In fact, these five companies’ first-quarter profits alone are equivalent to almost 28 percent of what Americans spent to fill up their gas tanks in the same time period,” the report noted.

Per Insider, for at least four of those companies, that growth marks a tremendous increase in profits from even before the pandemic.

Lawmakers Ramp-Up Efforts to Reduce Prices

To address these startling disparities, federal lawmakers have moved in recent weeks to increase pressure on oil companies and take steps to lower prices.

On Thursday, the House of Representatives passed a bill proposed by Rep. Katie Porter (D-Ca.) that aims to reduce gas prices. The legislation, called The Consumer Fuel Price Gouging Prevention Act, would give the president the authority to issue an Energy Emergency Declaration that would be effective for up to 30 days with the possibility of being renewed.

In that emergency period, it would be illegal for anyone to increase gas or home energy fuel prices to a level that is exploitative or “unconscionably excessive.” 

The proposal would also give the Federal Trade Commission the power to investigate and manage instances of price gouging from larger companies and give state authorities the ability to enforce price-gouging violations in civil courts.

The bill, which has already seen widespread opposition from Republicans and extensive lobbying from pro-oil interest groups, faces an uphill battle in the 50-50 split Senate.

During debate on the act Thursday, Rep. Porter delivered an impassioned speech accusing oil companies of driving their record profits by using their market power to unfairly increase prices.

“The oil and gas industry currently has more than 9,000 permits to drill for oil on federal land, but they are deliberately keeping production low to please their investors and increase their short-term profits,” she said. “Even when the price of crude oil falls, oil and gas companies have refused to pass those savings on to consumers.”

“Let me be clear: price gouging is anti-capitalist,” Porter continued. “It exploits a lack of competition, which is a hallmark of capitalism. It is an effort to juice corporate profits at the expense of customers. Energy markets are reeling because of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. Big oil companies, however, are using this temporary chaos to cover up their abuse.”

See what others are saying: (The Washington Post) (Vox) (NPR)

Continue Reading

U.S.

Lincoln College to Close for Good After COVID and Ransomware Attack Ruin Finances

Published

on

Last year, 1,043 schools in the U.S. were the victim of ransomware attacks, including 26 colleges or universities, according to an analysis by Emsisoft.


One of the Only Historically Black Colleges in the Midwest Goes Down

After 157 years of educating mostly Black students in Illinois, Lincoln College will close its doors for good on Friday.

The college made the announcement last month, citing financial troubles caused by the coronavirus pandemic and a ransomware attack in December.

Enrollment dropped during the pandemic and the administration had to make costly investments in technology and campus safety measures, according to a statement from the school.

A shrinking endowment put additional pressure on the college’s budget.

The ransomware attack, which the college has said originated from Iran, thwarted admissions activities and hindered access to all institutional data. Systems for recruitment, retention, and fundraising were completely inoperable at a time when the administration needed them most.

In March, the college paid the ransom, which it has said amounted to less than $100,000. But according to Lincoln’s statement, subsequent projections showed enrollment shortfalls so significant the college would need a transformational donation or partnership to make it beyond the present semester.

The college put out a request for $50 million in a last-ditch effort to save itself, but no one came forward to provide it.

A GoFundMe aiming to raise $20 million for the college only collected $2,452 as of Tuesday.

Students and Employees Give a Bittersweet Goodbye

“The loss of history, careers, and a community of students and alumni is immense,” David Gerlach, the college’s president, said in a statement.

Lincoln counts nearly 1,000 enrolled students, and those who did not graduate this spring will leave the institution without degrees.

Gerlach has said that 22 colleges have worked with Lincoln to accept the remaining students, including their credits, tuition prices, and residency requirements.

“I was shocked and saddened by that news because of me being a freshman, so now I have to find someplace for me to go,” one student told WMBD News after the closure was announced.

When a group of students confronted Gerlach at his office about the closure, he responded with an emotional speech.

“I have been fighting hard to save this place,” he said. “But resources are resources. We’ve done everything we possibly could.”

On April 30, alumni were invited back to the campus to revisit the highlights of their college years before the institution closed.

On Saturday, the college held its final graduation ceremony, where over 200 students accepted their diplomas and Quentin Brackenridge performed the Lincoln Alma Mater.

Last year, 1,043 schools in the U.S. were the victim of ransomware attacks, including 26 colleges or universities, according to an analysis by Emsisoft.

See what others are saying: (The New York Times) (Herald Review) (CNN)

Continue Reading