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Trump Suspends Multiple Work Visas That Could Have Allowed up to 525,000 to Work in the U.S.

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  • President Donald Trump signed an executive order Monday suspending multiple visa programs that allow foreign workers to enter the country. 
  • Notably, those suspensions will affect high-skilled tech workers, many healthcare professionals, students on work-study, and international business workers. 
  • Some of those visas exist as lottery systems, but the Trump administration wants to restructure them so that only the highest-paid applicants receive visas.
  • Additionally, the Trump administration is also moving to prevent asylum seekers who illegally cross the border from receiving work authorization in the United States.

Trump Suspends Multiple Work Visas

President Donald Trump signed an executive order Monday that extends a halt on the issuing of green cards and now suspends several visa programs until the end of the year.

It’s a move that officials said could keep as many as 525,000 workers out of the country for the rest of the year.

In April, Trump signed an order suspending the issuance of green cards to most foreigners for 60 days. At the time, he said the order was a response to the “invisible enemy” (COVID-19) and “the need to protect the jobs of our GREAT American Citizens.”

Trump stopped short of any broader immigration ban, but with this green card suspension having been set to expire on Monday, Trump sought to change that.

When suspending those visa programs Monday, Trump reiterated his original arguments, saying that these suspensions will ensure Americans are first in line for scarce jobs.

“Under the extraordinary circumstances of the economic contraction resulting from the Covid-19 outbreak, certain nonimmigrant visa programs authorizing such employment pose an unusual threat to the employment of American workers,” Trump said of the coronavirus in the order.

Who Will These Suspensions Affect?

Most notably, visa program H-1B was suspended in the executive order. That program includes a variety of skilled worker positions such as computer programmers for big tech companies.

Another visa program that is now suspended is known as H-2B. That suspension will affect seasonal workers like those in the hospitality industry; however, it won’t affect farm workers or workers in the food processing industry.

While some medical workers can also get an exemption for H-2B, that’s going to be a narrow window only allowed if they’re specifically conducting coronavirus research.

Additionally, J-1 short-term exchange visas are being suspended. Those include university students on work-study summer programs as well as au pairs who provide childcare. Professors and other scholars are not included in the order, and there will be a provision to request some exemptions.

Still, some critics have noted that even if a person is eligible to potentially apply for an exemption, there’s no assurance they’ll be approved for one.

The order also blocks L visas, which include managers and other key employees of multinational corporations. For example, American companies with global operations or international companies with U.S. branches will be unable to transfer foreign executives into the U.S.

None of these suspensions will affect workers who have already received a green card for these programs—even if those workers aren’t currently within the country. That said, their spouses will still be barred from coming into the country if they also don’t currently have a green card.

Business Leaders Push Back

Since signing the bill, a number of business leaders have pushed back against Trump. In fact, they’ve been lobbying to keep these visa programs active since the Trump administration first floated the idea of them.

One of the reasons Trump hadn’t suspended these programs earlier was because he abandoned the idea in April when he signed his original suspension after fierce backlash from business groups. 

Many businesses have argued these suspensions block the United States’ ability to recruit critical workers from overseas, especially for jobs that have a lack of qualified American applicants.

“Very much disagree with this action,” Tesla CEO Elon Musk—an immigrant himself—said. “In my experience, these skillsets are net job creators. Visa reform makes sense, but this is too broad.” 

Other Big Tech executives such as Apple CEO Tim Cook, Microsoft president Brad Smith, and Google CEO Sundar Pichai—also an immigrant—have also spoken out against the suspensions.

Others have argued that an outright suspension of these visas doesn’t mean they’ll suddenly be beneficial to American workers.

“Putting up a ‘not welcome’ sign for engineers, executives, IT experts, doctors, nurses and other workers won’t help our country, it will hold us back,” Thomas Donohue, the chief executive of the Chamber of Commerce, said after Trump signed the order. “Restrictive changes to our nation’s immigration system will push investment and economic activity abroad, slow growth and reduce job creation.” 

Immigration advocates have also hit back, saying that the “Americans first” idea doesn’t really reflect the reality of a dynamic and changing workforce.

Even Senator Lindsey Graham (R-SC), known to be a fierce defender of Trump’s policies, broke with the president in a lengthy Twitter thread.

“Legal immigration is a positive for the American economy, and visa programs allowing American companies to secure qualified, legal labor throughout the world have benefitted economic growth in the United States,” he said.

“Those who believe legal immigration, particularly work visas, are harmful to the American worker do not understand the American economy,” he added. 

“Before coronavirus, legal immigration and programs like these played an important role in helping President Trump create the strongest economy in generations. I have little doubt that programs like these would help him build it again.” 

“Unfortunately, I fear the President’s decision today to temporarily shut down these programs will create a drag on our economic recovery.”

At the same time, advocates for restricting immigration have applauded  the president. 

The work visa suspensions will put the thumb on the labor market scale in favor of U.S. workers,” Jessica Vaughan, the policy director at the Center for Immigration Studies, said according to The New York Times. 

“It’s really heartening to see the president stand up to the special interests that pull out the stops to lobby for these visa programs,” she added. 

How Does Trump Want to Revise Immigration?

Reportedly, Trump doesn’t want to stop at suspending those visa programs. According to senior administration officials, he is working to make substantial, permanent changes to a wide array of immigration regulations. 

Notably, that includes scrapping the current lottery system in which some visas are awarded and replacing it with more of a merit-based one. Part of the intent with that change is, according to officials, to prevent companies from contracting midlevel foreign workers, thus making accounting, programming, and other technology-based jobs more likely to go to U.S. citizens.

“This will drive both the wage level and the skill level of the H-1B applicants up,” a senior administration official said. “It will eliminate competition with Americans.”

Reportedly, the Department of Labor has also been instructed by Trump to set higher wages for H-1B holders and to probe potential abuses in the program. This is because foreign workers are typically paid lower wages. 

Another major change that is set to be enacted by the administration will bar asylum seekers who illegally cross the border from receiving work authorization. That rule is set to take effect on August 25.

Under it, even if a person legally crossed the border as an asylum seeker, their wait time to be able to apply for a job would jump from 150 days to a year.

See what others are saying: (The New York Times) (CBS News) (BBC)

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Georgia House Passes Sweeping Bill To Restrict Voting Access

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  • The Georgia House approved an election bill Monday that would impose new restrictions on absentee voting and provisional ballots, cut weekend early voting hours, and limit physical access to voting options, among other measures.
  • Republicans proposed the bill after losing the Presidential and Senate races, arguing that it is necessary to restore confidence in the state’s elections and prevent fraud.
  • Democrats have condemned the proposed law, noting that Republicans created the distrust by spreading former President Trump’s false claims about election fraud even when top GOP officials in the state said there was no evidence. They also accused them of trying to suppress voters, particularly Black residents.

Georgia House Approves Election Bill

Republicans in the Georgia House passed a sweeping bill Monday that would significantly roll back voting access in the state.

The bill, which was proposed by Republicans who want to impose new restrictions after losing the election, was passed 97-72 along party lines. If signed into law, among other things, the legislation would:

  • Require a photo ID for absentee voting.
  • Cut the amount of time voters have to request an absentee ballot.
  • Restrict ballot drop box locations to inside early voting locations.
  • Shorten Georgia’s runoff election period.
  • Impose more strict regulations on provisional ballots.
  • Prevent the governments from mailing out unsolicited absentee ballot applications to registered voters.
  • Ban nonprofit organizations from helping fund elections.
  • Almost entirely cut early voting busses that are key to transport people to the polls.
  • Prohibit food and drinks from being distributed to voters waiting in long lines.
  • Limit early voting hours on weekends.

The last provision is one of the most controversial because it would include limiting the get-out-the-vote campaign known as “souls to the polls,” which is widely used by Black churches. That initiative has been credited with mobilizing Black voters all over the country since the Jim Crow era. The proposed law would limit events to just one Sunday during the early voting period, which would also be cut short.

Arguments For And Against The Bill

The Republicans who have pushed for the bill argue that it is necessary to restore public confidence in Georgia’s elections and help prevent fraud.

But Democrats, voting rights organizations, and protestors who have gathered in front of the capitol to demonstrate against the bill have pointed out that it was Republicans who hurt public trust in the state’s elections by repeating former President Donald Trump’s false claims about election fraud.

Meanwhile, numerous top Republican officials — including Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensberger — have said time and time again that there was no evidence of fraud in the 2020 elections.

Though notably, many Republican state legislators who supported the former president’s false that massive fraud had occurred in their states never contested the results of their own elections, according to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

Democrats have also said that the bill is just the Republican’s latest, transparent attempt to drive down turnout and suppress voters — particularly Black voters who helped Democrat’s wins in the state and take the Senate — rather than actually increase election security.

Next Steps

As far as what happens next, the bill will head to the state Senate, which is also Republican-controlled, and already considering its own elections bill that would end no-excuse absentee voting, among other things.

From there, it will go to Gov. Brian Kemp (R), who will likely sympathetic to the cause.

Notably, this legislation the only election bill like this being proposed in state capitols around the country or even in Georgia.

According to the Brennan Center for Justice, legislators in 43 states are considering more than 250 bills that would create impediments to voting. Dozens of those proposals exist in Georgia alone.

See what others are saying: (The Atlanta Journal-Constitution) (NPR) (The Associated Press)

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Second Former Aide Accuses N.Y. Governor of Sexual Harassment

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  • New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) has been accused of sexual harassment by another former staffer, 25-year-old Charlotte Bennett, who first relayed the allegations to The New York Times on Saturday.
  • Bennett said Cuomo asked her multiple inappropriate questions about her sex life and told her he would be open to dating women in their 20s, which she interpreted as a request for a sexual relationship.
  • Bennett’s allegations come less than a week after another former aide, Lindsey Boylan, detailed years of sexual harassment from the governor, including an alleged non-consensual kiss, all of which Cuomo denied.
  • In a series of statements over the weekend, Cuomo said he never made advances towards Bennett, apologized to anyone who interpreted his comments as “unwanted flirtation,” and agreed to refer the matter to the state attorney general’s office.

Charlotte Bennett Claims Cuomo Sexually Harassed Her 

A second former aide to New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) has come forward with allegations of sexual harassment.

The news comes just days after another staffer, Lindsey Boylan, published a Medium essay accusing Cuomo of years of misconduct, including uncomfortable comments and an unwanted kiss.

In the essay, Boylan also said that Cuomo had created a culture of harassment and bullying in his administration. Allegations of hostility and a toxic work environment have also recently been echoed by numerous officials during the political fallout over the Cuomos administration’s failure to properly disclose COVID-19 related deaths in the state’s nursing home.

Now, the most recent accusations made by 25-year-old Charlotte Bennett, also support the same narrative. During an interview with The New York Times on Saturday, Bennett described a series of escalating interactions in which the governor asked her multiple questions about her personal life that she “interpreted as clear overtures to a sexual relationship.”

Bennett, who was hired for an entry-level position at Cuomo’s Manhattan office in 2019, said she and the governor became friendly shortly after she started. She said things started to escalate when she was moved to the Capitol office in Albany to work on the pandemic response in March.

She recounted several episodes where she said the governor asked her about her personal and romantic life in a way that made her feel uncomfortable. The most upsetting exchange she said she had was on June 5, during which Cuomo allegedly asked her a number of inappropriate questions, like whether she was monogamous in her recent relationships, if she believed age difference mattered, and if she had ever been with an older man.

Cuomo allegedly said he felt lonely during the pandemic and that he wanted a girlfriend, “preferably in the Albany area.” She claimed he also told her “age doesn’t matter” and that he was fine with dating “anyone above the age of 22.”

She said she then tried to shift the conversation, at one point telling him she was thinking about getting a tattoo, but said that Cuomo had suggested should put it on her buttocks so people would not see it when she wore a dress. 

Bennett told The Times Cuomo never was physical with her, though she believed that what he wanted from her was clear. 

“I understood that the governor wanted to sleep with me, and felt horribly uncomfortable and scared. And was wondering how I was going to get out of it and assumed it was the end of my job.”

Others Back Bennett’s Account 

Notably, Bennett also shared text messages she had sent friends and family after each interaction that were verified by The Times. Additionally, both her mother and a friend who was also a Cuomo official at the time confirmed that she had told them about the details of the June 5 interaction. 

Shortly after that incident, Bennett also disclosed what happened with Cuomo to his chief of staff, who she said was very apologetic, asked if she wanted to move jobs either inside or outside the executive branch, and ultimately helped her transfer to another job in a different part of the Capitol.

Towards the end of June, Bennett met with a special counsel to the governor — a fact that was confirmed to The Times by another special counsel to the governor — but she ultimately decided just to move on and not pursue an investigation.

Cuomo Calls for Investigation

Cuomo, for his part, told The Times in a statement Saturday that he believed he had been acting as a mentor and “never made advances toward Ms. Bennett, nor did I ever intend to act in any way that was inappropriate.”

His special counsel also said later that day that the governor had tapped a federal judge to launch an independent investigation into the allegations.

That announcement, however, sparked backlash from top lawmakers who believed there needed to be a truly independent probe, including House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Ca.), who called the allegations from both women “serious and credible.” 

White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki also told reporters that President Joe Biden supported an independent review.

On Sunday, Cuomo reversed his position in a statement and said that he would refer the investigation to the New York attorney general. The governor also claimed that he “never inappropriately touched anybody” and “never intended to offend anyone or cause any harm,” but that he just liked to tease people about their personal lives.

“I now understand that my interactions may have been insensitive or too personal and that some of my comments, given my position, made others feel in ways I never intended,” he said. “I acknowledge some of the things I have said have been misinterpreted as an unwanted flirtation. To the extent anyone felt that way, I am truly sorry about that.”

See what others are saying: (The Washington Post) (NBC News) (CBS News)

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House Passes Equality Act Aimed at Preventing LGBTQ+ Discrimination

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  • The House voted Thursday to approve the Equality Act, which would amend the 1964 Civil Rights Act to prohibit discrimination against people based on sexual orientation and gender identity.
  • Democrats and civil rights groups have applauded the move, saying it is necessary to protect LGBTQ+ Americans from discrimination in employment, housing, education, and other public areas.
  • Republicans and conservative groups have opposed the bill, arguing it violates religious freedoms by forcing organizations that refuse to serve LGBTQ+ people to choose between operating on their beliefs.
  • The legislation faces an uphill battle in the Senate, where it will need 60 votes to avoid the legislative filibuster.

House Approves Equality Act

The U.S. House of Representatives passed the Equality Act on Thursday, a broad measure that would greatly expand protections for the LGBTQ+ community.

The legislation would amend the 1964 Civil Rights Act to ban discrimination against people based on sexual orientation and gender identity in numerous public areas such as employment, housing, education, credit, and jury service, among other places. 

The bill also would expand the 1964 act to cover other federally funded programs and “public accommodations” like shopping malls, sports stadiums, and online retailers. 

Currently, anti-discrimination protections for LGBTQ+ people fall under the umbrella of “sex,” a relatively new development that came last June after the Supreme Court ruled that gay, lesbian, and transgender Americans were protected under the Civil Rights Act on the basis of sex.

But the existing law still has many loopholes that have allowed for discriminatory practices against the LGBTQ+ community.

A person can still be denied housing due to their sexual orientation or gender identity in 27 states, according to a statement released by Rep. David Cicilline (D-R.I.), the leading sponsor of the measure. They can also be denied access to education in 31 states and the right to serve on a jury in 41.

Support and Opposition

Many Democrats, civil rights organizations, and LGBTQ+ advocacy groups have praised the House’s passage of the bill, which has been decades in the making, and which President Joe Biden had promised would be one of his top priorities during his first 100 days in office.

“Today’s vote is a major milestone for equality bringing us closer to ensuring that every person is treated equally under the law,” Human Rights Campaign president Alphonso David said in a statement. “Now, the ball is in the Senate’s court to pass the Equality Act and finally allow LGBTQ Americans the ability to live their lives free from discrimination.”

However, the legislation faces an uphill battle in the Senate, which previously blocked the legislation when the House initially passed in it 2019. While the Senate was controlled by Republicans at the time, the current 50-50 split still means that at least 10 Republicans will have to join all 50 Democrats to break the 60-vote legislative filibuster.

But Republicans in Congress have largely opposed the act. Only three GOP representatives voted in favor of the measure Thursday, just half of the number who voted for its passage in 2019.

Many Republicans have echoed the claims of anti-LGBTQ+ groups, arguing that the act will infringe on religious freedoms by forcing businesses and organizations that have religious objections to serving LGBTQ+ people to decide between their beliefs or continued operation.

Others have also said the bill that would roll back protections for women who were assigned female at birth by allowing transgender women to participate in women’s sports.

Shift in Public Opinion

Still, Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) said Thursday he will fight for the act in his chamber and condemned Republicans who have voiced their opposition to it.

“Their attacks on trans people in the transgender community are just mean,” he said. “And show a complete lack of understanding, complete lack of empathy. They don’t represent our views and they don’t represent the views of a majority of Americans.”

Several recent polls have found that Americans broadly support legal protections for the LGBTQ+ community.

According to the 2020 Public Religion Research Institute American Values Survey, more than 8 in 10 people said they favor laws that would protect LGBTQ+ people against discrimination in public accommodations and workplaces.

A 2020 Kaiser Family Foundation poll found the number of Americans who support these laws to be slightly lower, roughly 7 in 10. Notably, that also included 62% of Republicans, which may indicate that the actions of GOP leaders in Congress do not represent the will of their voter base.

See what others are saying: (The Washington Post) (NPR) (CNN)

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