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The Deaths of Black Trans Women Who Inspired Trans Black Lives Matter Marches Are Being Misreported

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  • The brutal deaths of two Black transgender women— Dominique “Rem’Mie” Fells and Riah Milton—have sparked outrage across the country.
  • Protests in major cities have led to people calling for Black Lives Matter protesters to affirm that transgender members of the Black community are included in that message.
  • Fells and Milton’s deaths have also been subject to widespread misreporting and misgendering.
  • Most notably, the Human Rights Campaign and Kim Kardashian-West have shared the wrong photo of Milton, instead sharing a photo of her cisgender aunt.

Deaths of Fells and Milton

The recent deaths of several Black transgender people have led to outrage and massive demonstrations calling for the Black Lives Matter movement to also recognize LGBTQ+ members of the community. Their deaths have also led to widespread deadnaming and misreporting. 

Police found Dominique “Rem’Mie” Fells body floating in a river in West Philadelphia on June 8. The details depict a gruesome scene: Fells died of multiple stab wounds. She had been beaten, with bruising along her head. Her legs had been cut off. Dive teams later found them in bags in the river.

On June 11, police positively identified that the body belonged to Fells. The next day, they ruled her death a homicide.

On June 9, a day after Fells’ body was found, another transgender woman named Riah Milton was shot and killed in Ohio. There, police said three people tried to rob Miltonof her vehicle in the early hours of the morning.

According to police, two of the suspects have been arrested. One of them has been charged with murder, and the other—a 14-year-old girl—has been charged with complicity to murder. Police are still looking for the third person, Tyree Cross, who they’ve charged with complicity to murder, as well.

The police report on Milton’s death deadnames and misgenders her. 

Response and “All Black Lives Matter” Protests

Among the notable responses to these deaths, the Black Lives Matter Twitter account has shared photos of both women, saying, “Heartbroken over our sisters. Rest in Power.” 

Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) has also shared photos of the women, saying, “The murder of Black trans women is a crisis. Say their names: Dominique “Rem’mie” Fells and Riah Milton.” 

According to the Human Rights Campaign, at least 15 transgender and gender non-conforming people have been killed this year alone, but as the HRC also notes, those deaths are also likely undercounted. Even when they are counted, often, they’re subjected to deadnaming, misgendering, and other types of misreporting.

Regarding Fells, Philadelphia’s Office of LGBT Affairs issued a statement following her death, noting that Fells died during Pride Month. 

“The pain of such a loss is always difficult, but it is especially deep as we are in the midst of Pride month—a season typically filled with joy and celebration for many in our community,” it said.

“As thousands take to the streets to proclaim that Black Lives Matter, it is critical we remember that this includes Black trans lives. Dominique Rem’mie Fells’ life mattered,” it added.

Philadelphia Mayor Jim Kenney later echoed that statement, saying, “When we say #BlackLivesMatter, that includes Black trans lives. I join our LGBTQ and Black communities in mourning the loss of Dominique Rem’mie Fells.”

In the wake of Fells and Milton’s deaths, many Black Lives Matter protesters have begun to shift attention to the higher rates of violence that trans people, especially trans people of color, face in the United States.

On Sunday, thousands stood outside of the Brooklyn Museum in New York to call for justice in the brutal murders of trans people. Many held signs such as “Trans Rights Now” and “Black Trans Lives Matter.” Notably, that march was also led by Black trans women.

In Chicago, thousands turned out for the Boystown drag march. In Salt Lake City, thousands marched in support of Black Lives Matter and Black Trans Lives Matter. 

Source: Book Club Chicago

In Los Angeles, an estimated tens of thousands of people marched through Hollywood in an event known as “All Black Lives Matter.”

In addition to protesting the deaths of Fells and Milton, that protest was also organized in response to the death of Tony McDade, a Black transgender man who was shot and killed by a white police officer in Tallahassee on May 27.

Police have said McDade was a suspect in a stabbing homicide, but as to how McDade himself died, there has been conflicting testimonies. Police claim McDade was shot because he aimed a gun at an officer; however, witness testimony has painted a different story. 

One person who recorded a Facebook Live at the scene claimed that police said “stop moving” before calling McDade the n-word. That person went on to claim that McDade stopped moving but was then shot by an officer.

The officer who killed McDade has been placed on administrative leave. A lawyer for McDade’s family has called for body cam footage to be released, saying it could shed light on what really happened.

“There are all types of stories going on as far as what happened, and what didn’t happen, and what he had or what he didn’t have,” the McDade family’s attorney, Mutaqee Akbar, said. “What’s most important is this law enforcement officer is still on the streets. If it shows that that law enforcement officer did something that was inappropriate, we need to know right away whether he should still be on the streets or even on office duty.”

Misreporting/Misgendering

Like how police have misgendered Milton, Tallahassee PD initially misgendered McDade as a woman. That then spilled over to local news outlets that were reporting on McDade, who had not been named at the time. 

On May 28 when TPD released McDade’s name, they did refer to him as “Tony,” but they also deadnamed him. 

Alongside that, multiple news outlets have continued to deadname Milton, but it’s not just deadnaming. There has been heavy misreporting associated with these deaths. 

For example, the HRC released a statement on Milton’s death Friday. In that statement, it included a photo of Milton, but that photo wasn’t actually even of her. It was of her cisgender aunt who had previously died. 

From there, Milton’s sister—Ariel Mary Ann—reached out to the HRC, who she said profusely apologized for the mistake and replaced the photo of Milton’s aunt with a candle. Later, HRC issued a public apology. 

The next day, on Saturday, Kim Kardashian-West posted that exact same photo of Milton’s aunt on Twitter. 

On Sunday, after having become aware of the tweet, both Mary Ann and Milton’s cousin Maurisha repeatedly called for it to be taken down.

“The woman on the right on this graphic is not my cousin Riah,” Maurisha said. “It is my mom who recently died.”

“IT NEEDS TO BE TAKEN DOWN IMMEDIATELY,” Mary Ann said. 

In an update the same day, the reported creator of that photo jumped in, saying Kardashian-West had copied the photo and not retweeted it directly. Therefore, the creator couldn’t take it down.

“ACTION NEEDED:  I used a photo from a statement HRC ran 2 days ago to make an image,” the creator said. “The photo is not Riah Milton. Please help me by reporting the tweet with the image that @KimKardashian made as its not a rt but a screen-cap. I don’t want my mistake to cause more hurt.” 

But for days, Kardashian-West’s tweet remained up.

“This added a whole other level of stress on top of everything else that I was dealing with, especially because I saw that the photo was being retweeted,” Mary Ann told BuzzFeed News.

Also speaking to BuzzFeed, Maurisha said, “Everyone else used the same picture of Riah except Kim, and it makes me question if she really cares about Black Trans Lives. My mom and my cousin Riah do not look alike at all.” 

Maurisha also went on to accuse Kardashian-West of performance activism, saying that it is “easy for them to just post these graphics and act like they’re in solidarity with Black Trans Women and the Black Lives Matter movement and go on with their day without doing the actual work because it’s not directly affecting them.”

Connected to those interviews, BuzzFeed News reached out to representatives for Kardashian-West, and while they declined to comment, that tweet was finally deleted shortly afterward. 

 Kardashian-West hasn’t apologized for posting the wrong photo.

Additionally, The Washington Post currently reports in a June 14 article that Milton and Fells were killed by police. But as far as publicly known information, that’s not true. None of the suspects in Milton’s death are officers, and police are still trying to figure out who killed Fells. 

See what others are saying: (BuzzFeed News) (The Los Angeles Times) (Time)

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China Imposes Retaliatory Sanctions on US Officials Over Xinjiang Criticisms

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  • The U.S. imposed sanctions on Chinese officials last week over the treatment of Uighurs and other ethnic minorities in the Xinjiang region.
  • The decision was the latest escalation during a time of heightened tensions between the two nations over policies in Hong Kong, the trade war, and questions about sovereignty in the South China Sea, among other matters.
  • In response, China announced retaliatory sanctions against U.S. officials, including Senators Ted Cruz and Marco Rubio.
  • However, what exactly the Chinese sanctions will do is currently unclear as officials haven’t given specifics yet.

Sanctions and Counter Sanctions

Senators Marco Rubio (R-FL) and Ted Cruz (R-TX) were sanctioned by China on Monday over their involvement in criticizing the nation’s actions in Xinjiang. Two other American officials faced sanctions as well for interfering in “China’s internal affairs,” as characterized by the Chinese Foreign Ministry.

The Chinese sanctions were in retaliation over earlier sanctions the U.S. placed on Chinese officials last Thursday. The U.S. was able to do this following the passage of the Uighur Human Rights Policy Act last month. That law allows the U.S. to place sanctions, in line with the Global Magnitsky Act, on officials who are involved in the ongoing repression of ethnic minorities in Xinjiang.

When the law was passed in mid-June, China warned that if the U.S. actually imposed any sanctions they would do the same in retaliation. after Thursday’s announcement, the Chinese Foreign Ministry stated, “We urge the US to immediately rescind its wrong decision and stop making any remarks or moves that interfere in China’s internal affairs and undermine China’s interests. The Chinese side will firmly fight back if the US obstinately pursues such agenda.”

Zhao Lijian, Spokesman for the Chinese Foreign Ministry speaking to reporters about US-imposed Sanctions. (Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the People’s Republic of China)

Despite China’s threat, the U.S. imposed sanctions on certain Chinese officials and organizations involved in Xinjiang on July 9. The sanctions include freezing the assets these officials hold in the U.S., as well as restricting the ability of the officials and their immediate family members’ to enter the U.S.

In a statement on July 9, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo wrote, “The United States will not stand idly by as the CCP carries out human rights abuses targeting Uyghurs, ethnic Kazakhs, and members of other minority groups in Xinjiang, to include forced labor, arbitrary mass detention, and forced population control, and attempts to erase their culture and Muslim faith.”

Out of the four named individuals in the sanctions, one stands out: Chen Quanguo. Chen is the Communist Party secretary for Xinjiang and part of the Politburo and the highest-ranking Chinese official to ever be sanctioned under the Global Magnitsky Act. He first received infamy for his actions while doing the same job in Tibet from 2011-2016.

The Treasury Department named three other individuals who would have their assets frozen for helping Chen set up the surveillance and detention families in Xinjiang.

Additionally, the Xinjiang Public Security Bureau (XPSB) was also sanctioned by the Treasury Department, and the State Department added that officials who worked with the XPSB were also liable to have themselves and their families denied entry into the U.S.

When speaking about the sanctions, Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin said, “The United States is committed to using the full breadth of its financial powers to hold human rights abusers accountable in Xinjiang and across the world.”

Tit-for-Tat Hostilities

However, these sanctions will likely end up being largely symbolic because these officials don’t travel to the U.S. in the first place. It’s also believed that their assets aren’t based in America but in China.

Even as a symbolic act, it still made China upset. On Monday, the country imposed its own sanctions against the four U.S. officials in retaliation, including the aforementioned Senators Cruz and Rubio.

Cruz was likely placed on this list for his work as part of the U.S. Congressional-Executive Commission on China. Two other officials part of that committee were also named, including Rep. Chris Smith (R-NJ), and Sam Brownback, a lawyer who also serves as the US Ambassador at Large for International Religious Freedom.,

Rubio was likely named over his co-sponsorship of the Uighur Human Rights Policy Act. Interestingly though, China avoided issuing sanctions on the other co-sponsor, Sen. Robert Menedez (D-NJ).

As far as what these sanctions will actually do, that’s a little unclear. So far, China hasn’t given any specifics as to what the penalties would be.

These recent sanctions are just the next step in ongoing tit-for-tats between the two countries. There’s an ongoing trade war, tensions over how Hong Kong is being treated by the mainland Chinese, issues over the sovereignty of the South China Sea, and major problems with how the Chinese are treating ethnic minorities in the Xinjiang region.

The problems in Xinjiang are so bad, that there are pundits and experts calling it a cultural genocide.

Even outside of the US, China has increasingly been pressured to change course over Xinjiang and Hong Kong.

See what others are saying: (NBC News) (Al Jazeera) (NPR)

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San Francisco Lawmaker Proposes CAREN Act to Make False, Racist 911 Calls Illegal

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  • San Francisco City Supervisor Shamann Walton introduced an ordinance this week called the CAREN Act, which would make false, racially discriminatory 911 calls illegal.
  • The acronym stands for Caution Against Racially Exploitative Non-Emergencies. It is named after “Karens,” a nickname for white women who throw unwarranted fits in public.
  • These fits often appear racially motivated and have led to “Karens” calling the police on people of color.
  • California Assemblyman Rob Bonta has also introduced a similar piece of legislation that would outlaw these calls throughout the state.

Why the “CAREN” Act?

A lawmaker in San Francisco has introduced an ordinance that would outlaw making false, racially discriminatory 911 calls, dubbed the CAREN Act.

City Supervisor Shamann Walton introduced the ordinance. In a tweet announcing the act on Tuesday, he called racist 911 calls “unacceptable.”

The CAREN Act stands for Caution Against Racially Exploitative Non-Emergencies, but its name bears much more weight. A “Karen” is an Internet nickname for white women whose privilege and entitlement leads to loud complaints, threats of legal action, calling supervisors, and often, calling the police. The unjustified outrage of Karens has been documented in countless viral incidents, and in many cases, they show a clear prejudice against people of color. 

One video that went viral in May has been pointed to as a prime example of this. In that clip, Amy Cooper, a white woman in New York, called the police on a Black man named Christian Cooper. Both were in Central park at the time when the man asked her to put her dog on a leash, as she was required to do in that area.

However, that confrontation escalated when she desperately told a 911 operator that she was being threatened when she was not. Many felt her instinct to weaponize her white privilege and make a false claim could have had serious consequences considering the fact that Black Americans are more likely to face police brutality and die in police custody. She has since been charged with filing a false report after much public outrage.

While videos of this nature have often gone viral, this incident came at a cultural tipping point. Not long after it made its way across the Internet, another story received national attention: a video of George Floyd being killed by police officers in Minneapolis. This sparked a movement of people confronting systemic racism and police brutality, and since then, more “Karen” videos have spread online in an effort to hold people accountable for their racist behavior.

What the Ordinance Does

While filing a false police report is already illegal, Walton is pushing for more to be done to stop people from calling the authorities on people of color for no real reason. The CAREN Act would make it illegal to fabricate a report based on racial and other kinds of discrimination. 

“Within the last month and a half in the Bay Area, an individual called the police on a Black man who was dancing and exercising on the street in his Alameda neighborhood and a couple called the police on a Filipino man stenciling ‘Black Lives Matter’ in chalk in front of his own residence in San Francisco’s Pacific Heights,” he said in a statement. 

This is not the only proposal of its kind. California Assemblyman Rob Bonta has introduced a similar ordinance. His proposed legislation, AB 1150, would make state that “discriminatory 911 calls qualify as a hate crime, and further establish civil liability for the person who discriminatorily called 911.”

“AB 1550, when amended, will impose serious consequences on those who make 911 calls that are motivated by hate and bigotry; actions that inherently cause harm and pain to others,” Bonta said in a statement. “This bill is incredibly important to upholding our values and ensuring the safety of all Californians.”

See what others are saying: (SFist) (The Hill) (CNN)

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Catholic Church Granted at Least $1.4 Billion in PPP Loans

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  • An analysis from the Associated Press found that the Catholic Church received at least between $1.4 and $3.5 billion in federal coronavirus relief aid.
  • The report identified 3,500 loans the Church received from the Paycheck Protection Program, but leaders have previously stated that as many as 9,000 bodies of the Church received funding.
  • However, government data only shared who received loans over $150,000. Smaller churches that received under that amount were not on the list, meaning the Catholic Church could have collected even more than records show.
  • Usually, religious groups would not be eligible for funding from the Small Business Administration, but the Church allegedly spent a good chunk of money lobbying so that there would be an exception for the PPP.

Catholic Church Receives Billions in PPP Funds

The Catholic Church received between $1.4 and $3.5 billion in federal coronavirus relief aid, according to a Friday analysis from the Associated Press.

While houses of worship and religious organizations are usually ineligible for federal aid from the Small Business Administration, an exception was made for the Paycheck Protection Program, which was designed to keep American businesses afloat as the pandemic shut the country down.

The AP found records of 3,500 forgivable loans for Catholic dioceses, parishes, schools, and other ministries. That number, however, is likely higher.

The Diocesan Fiscal Management Conference has claimed that 9,000 Catholic bodies received loans. Government data only shared loans over $150,000, so smaller churches who got less were not on the list, meaning the Church may have pocketed even more than $3.5 billion. 

“The government grants special dispensation, and that creates a kind of structural favoritism,” Micah Schwartzman, a University of Virginia law professor told the AP. “And that favoritism was worth billions of dollars.”

According to the AP, the Archdiocese of New York received $28 million just for executive offices. St. Patrick’s Cathedral in New York City received $1 million. Diocesan officials in Orange County, California received four loans worth $3 million. The AP’s analysis suggests that the Catholic Church and its entities were able to retain 407,900 jobs with this loan money.

“These loans are an essential lifeline to help faith-based organizations to stay afloat and continue serving those in need during this crisis,” spokesperson Chieko Noguchi told the AP.

How Did the Church Get Aid?

Like many businesses throughout the country, churches had to shut their doors as large gatherings became unsafe as the coronavirus’ spread continued. Masses were canceled or moved online and celebrations for the Easter holidays were dropped, causing the Church to to fall behind financially. 

While its global net worth is not known, the Catholic Church is considered the wealthiest religious organization in the world. It is also one of the most powerful groups of any kind, with an estimated 1.2 billion followers all over the planet. According to the AP, its deep pockets and far-reaching influence helped it receive federal aid. 

The Catholic Church lobbied heavily to make sure religious groups were allowed to receive money from the PPP, the AP says. Their report found that the Los Angeles archdiocese spent $20,000 lobbying Congress to include “eligibility for non-profits” in the CARES Act, the legislation that formed the PPP. Records also show that Catholic Charities USA spent another $30,000 in CARES Act lobbying.

With its wealth and power, the Catholic Church is also plagued with controversy and scandal. For years, there have been reports that the Church has covered up for priests and other leaders who have been accused of sexual abuse. Many entities of the church have had to shell out large sums of money in legal fees and settlements. 

The AP found that around 40 of the dioceses that have paid out “hundreds of millions of dollars” to related compensation funds or bankruptcy proceedings received loans. These loans totaled at least $200 million.

See what others are saying: (Associated Press) (Business Insider) (Market Watch)

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