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Louisville Mayor Calls for “Thorough Investigation” Into the Killing of Breonna Taylor

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  • Breonna Taylor, a 26-year-old EMT, was shot eight times and killed by three Louisville police officers who incorrectly entered her home on a search warrant.
  • The suspect they were looking for lived in another part of the city and had already been apprehended.
  • When the officers entered, Taylor and her boyfriend Kenneth Walker thought their home was being broken into, prompting Walker to shoot at one of the officers, who sustained an injury. Walker has been charged with assault and attempted murder. 
  • A complaint against the officers states that they shot around the apartment “with a total disregard for the value of human life.” Some shots even made it into the neighboring house. None of the officers have been charged.
  • The shooting happened in March but did not make headlines until this week when Benjamin Crump, Ahmaud Arbery’s lawyer, took on the case. Louisville’s mayor is also requesting a thorough investigation.

Mayor Speaks Out

The mayor of Louisville said Tuesday that a serious investigation needs to be conducted after a woman was shot eight times and killed by police who entered her home at night, looking for a suspect who lived in another part of the city. 

“As always, my priority is that the truth comes out, and for justice to follow the path of truth.” mayor Greg Fischer said in a statement. “I have spoken with LMPD Chief Steve Conrad about this case and he is well aware of the need for a thorough investigation.”

Breonna Taylor Killed by Police

On March 13, Breonna Taylor, an EMT, was asleep in her apartment with her boyfriend Kenneth Walker. According to an April complaint, which was obtained by the Courier Journal, three officers in plainclothes arrived there at around 12:30 a.m.

The officers were acting on a search warrant, but the suspect they were looking for lived in a different part of the city. He had already been apprehended in his own home by officers earlier that day. 

The complaint claims that the officers did not knock on the door and entered unannounced. The Louisville Metro Police Department has since said that the officers had a no-knock warrant, meaning they would not have to do so if they thought identifying themselves could be dangerous. When they got into her home, Taylor and Walker thought they were breaking in. Police say that Walker, who has a license to carry, shot at one of the officers, prompting them to fire back. 

The complaint says the three officers did so “with a total disregard for the value of human life.”

“Shots were blindly fired by the officers all throughout Breonna’s home and also into the adjacent home, where a five-year-old child and a pregnant mother had been sleeping,” the complaint reads. “Breonna Taylor was shot at least eight times by the officers’ gunfire and died as a result. Breonna had posed no threat to the officers and did nothing to deserve to die in their hands.”

The three officers have been identified as Brett Hankinson, Myles Cosgrove and Jonathan Mattingly, all of whom have been placed on administrative reassignment. According to the complaint, Cosgrove has a prior history of shooting a Louisville resident seven times. 

The complaint also claims that Hankinson has a history of using unnecessary force and corruption as an officer. This includes incidents where he has sent citizens to the hospital after being tased and pepper-sprayed, fought with citizens, broken car windshields, and punched someone so hard that he himself needed stitches. 

Case Gets National Attention

This complaint alleges battery, wrongful death, negligence, and excessive force against the officers. No charges have been pressed against them. On the other side, Walker is being charged with attempted murder and assault, as his shot hit and injured Officer Mattingly. Neither Walker or Taylor have any criminal history. 

While the shooting occurred back in March, it did not make national headlines until Taylor’s family hired Benjamin Crump to represent them. Crump is also representing Ahmaud Arbery, who was shot and killed while running unarmed in a Georgia neighborhood. 

“This was a botched execution of a search warrant where they already had the person they were searching for in custody,” Crump said in a statement. “We stand with the family of this young woman in demanding answers from the Louisville Police Department.”

The LMPD has not issued public statements about the case because the investigation is ongoing. Online, the case has started to get attention from prominent politicians like Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Sen. Kamala Harris. 

See what others are saying: (Courier Journal) (NBC News) (Washington Post)
Note: This article has been edited to include updated information about the no-knock warrant LMPD claims its officers were issued.

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Lincoln College to Close for Good After COVID and Ransomware Attack Ruin Finances

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Last year, 1,043 schools in the U.S. were the victim of ransomware attacks, including 26 colleges or universities, according to an analysis by Emsisoft.


One of the Only Historically Black Colleges in the Midwest Goes Down

After 157 years of educating mostly Black students in Illinois, Lincoln College will close its doors for good on Friday.

The college made the announcement last month, citing financial troubles caused by the coronavirus pandemic and a ransomware attack in December.

Enrollment dropped during the pandemic and the administration had to make costly investments in technology and campus safety measures, according to a statement from the school.

A shrinking endowment put additional pressure on the college’s budget.

The ransomware attack, which the college has said originated from Iran, thwarted admissions activities and hindered access to all institutional data. Systems for recruitment, retention, and fundraising were completely inoperable at a time when the administration needed them most.

In March, the college paid the ransom, which it has said amounted to less than $100,000. But according to Lincoln’s statement, subsequent projections showed enrollment shortfalls so significant the college would need a transformational donation or partnership to make it beyond the present semester.

The college put out a request for $50 million in a last-ditch effort to save itself, but no one came forward to provide it.

A GoFundMe aiming to raise $20 million for the college only collected $2,452 as of Tuesday.

Students and Employees Give a Bittersweet Goodbye

“The loss of history, careers, and a community of students and alumni is immense,” David Gerlach, the college’s president, said in a statement.

Lincoln counts nearly 1,000 enrolled students, and those who did not graduate this spring will leave the institution without degrees.

Gerlach has said that 22 colleges have worked with Lincoln to accept the remaining students, including their credits, tuition prices, and residency requirements.

“I was shocked and saddened by that news because of me being a freshman, so now I have to find someplace for me to go,” one student told WMBD News after the closure was announced.

When a group of students confronted Gerlach at his office about the closure, he responded with an emotional speech.

“I have been fighting hard to save this place,” he said. “But resources are resources. We’ve done everything we possibly could.”

On April 30, alumni were invited back to the campus to revisit the highlights of their college years before the institution closed.

On Saturday, the college held its final graduation ceremony, where over 200 students accepted their diplomas and Quentin Brackenridge performed the Lincoln Alma Mater.

Last year, 1,043 schools in the U.S. were the victim of ransomware attacks, including 26 colleges or universities, according to an analysis by Emsisoft.

See what others are saying: (The New York Times) (Herald Review) (CNN)

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U.S. Tops One Million Coronavirus Deaths, WHO Estimates 15 Million Worldwide

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India’s real COVID death toll stands at about 4.7 million, ten times higher than official data, the WHO estimated.


One Million Dead

The United States officially surpassed one million coronavirus deaths Wednesday, 26 months after the first death was reported in late February of 2020.

Experts believe that figure is likely an undercount, since there are around 200,000 excess deaths, though some of those may not be COVID-related.

The figure is the equivalent of the population of San Jose, the tenth-largest city in the U.S., vanishing in just over two years. To put the magnitude in visual perspective, NECN published a graphic illustrating what one million deaths looks like.

At the beginning of the pandemic, the White House predicted between 100,000 and 240,000 Americans would die from the coronavirus in a best-case scenario.

By February 2021, over half a million Americans had died of COVID.

The coronavirus has become the third leading cause of death in the U.S. behind heart disease and cancer.

The pandemic’s effects go beyond its death toll. Around a quarter of a million children have lost a caregiver to the virus, including about 200,000 who lost one or both parents. Every COVID-related death leaves an estimated nine people grieving.

The virus has hit certain industries harder than others, with food and agriculture, warehouse operations and manufacturing, and transportation and construction seeing especially high death rates.

People’s mental health has also been affected, with a study in January of five Western countries including the U.S. finding that 13% of people reported symptoms of PTSD attributable to actual or potential contact with the virus.

Fifteen Million Dead

On Thursday, the World Health Organization estimated that nearly 15 million people have died from the pandemic worldwide, a dramatic revision from the 5.4 million previously reported in official statistics.

Between January 2020 and the end of last year, the WHO estimated that between 13.3 million and 16.6 million people died either due to the coronavirus directly or because of factors somehow attributed to the pandemic’s impact on health systems, such as cancer patients who were unable to seek treatment when hospitals were full of COVID patients.

Based on that range, scientists arrived at an approximate total of 14.9 million.

The new estimate shows a 13% increase in deaths than is usually expected for a two-year period.

“This may seem like just a bean-counting exercise, but having these WHO numbers is so critical to understanding how we should combat future pandemics and continue to respond to this one,” Dr. Albert Ko, an infectious diseases specialist at the Yale School of Public Health who was not linked to the WHO research, told the Associated Press.

Most of the deaths occurred in Southeast Asia, Europe, and the Americas.

According to the WHO, India counts the most deaths by far with 4.7 million, ten times its official number.

See what others are saying: (NBC) (U.S. News and World Report) (Scientific American)

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Official Says Missing Alabama Convict and Corrections Officer Had a “Special Relationship”

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Authorities have also said they now believe the officer willfully helped the inmate escape.


New Information on Missing Inmate & Officer

Authorities in Alabama revealed Tuesday that Assistant Director of Corrections for Lauderdale County Vicky White, who is accused of helping a murder suspect Casey Cole White escape from jail, had a “special relationship” with the inmate.

“Investigators received information from inmates at the Lauderdale County Detention Center over the weekend that there was a special relationship between Director White and inmate Casey White,” Lauderdale County Sheriff Rick Singleton said in a statement. “That relationship has now been confirmed through our investigation by independent sources and means.”

Officials have previously said that the two are not related, despite their shared surname.

Singleton elaborated on the nature of the relationship while speaking to CNN later on Tuesday. He said it took place “outside of her normal work hours” and added that although it did not include “physical contact,” he still characterized it as “a relationship of a different nature.”

“We were told Casey White got special privileges and was treated differently while in the facility than the other inmates,” Singleton said.

Also on Tuesday, the Marshals Service issued a statement confirming that authorities believe Officer White had helped Mr. White escape. The authorities described her as a “wanted fugitive” and offered a $5,000 reward for any information on her whereabouts. Earlier this week, the Marshals Service also offered a $10,000 reward for any information that could lead to Mr. White’s capture.

Singleton echoed the belief that Officer White’s actions were intentional while speaking to Good Morning America Wednesday.

“I think all of our employees and myself included were really hoping that she did not participate in this willingly. But all indications are that she absolutely did,” he said. “We’re very disappointed in that because we had the utmost trust in her as an employee and as an assistant director of corrections.”

Mysterious Escape

Vicky White and Casey White were last seen leaving the Lauderdale County jail just after 9:30 a.m. Friday. The officer told other employees that she was taking the inmate to a mental health evaluation at a courthouse just down the road, and that she would be going to a medical appointment after because she was not feeling well.

Officials later said her actions violated an official policy that required two sworn deputies to transport people with murder charges. In 2020, Mr. White was charged with two counts of capital murder in connection to a fatal stabbing he confessed to and was awaiting his trial in Lauderdale County.

Mr. White was also serving time for what officials said was a “crime spree” in 2015 which included home invasion, carjacking, and a police chase. He had also previously tried to escape from jail, police said.

It wasn’t until 3:30 p.m. on Friday that a jail employee reported to higher-ups that he was not able to reach Officer White on her phone and that Mr. White had never been returned to his cell.

During a press conference that same night, Singleton told reporters that there had never even been a scheduled mental health evaluation. At another briefing Monday, he announced that an arrest warrant had been issued for Vicky on a charge of “permitting or facilitating an escape in the first degree.”

At the time, Singleton said it was unclear “whether she did that willingly or was coerced or threatened” but added, “we know for sure she did participate.” 

See what others are saying: (CNN) (ABC News) (NPR)

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