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EU Asks Netflix and Others to Limit HD Content to Ease Internet Strain

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  • Internet services are seeing high usage spikes as more and more people are forced inside for coronavirus lockdowns.
  • EU Commissioner Thierry Breton spoke with Netflix CEO Reed Hastings about this issue Wednesday, urging the site to serve only standard definition content rather than HD during peak hours. 
  • While there haven’t been any reports of internet outages or adverse effects yet, the Commission is preparing nonetheless and is also calling on users to be responsible about their data consumption.
  • Tech companies across the board are supporting these measures.

Lockdowns Continue, Internet Usage Surges

The European Union is calling on Netflix and other streaming platforms to help preserve Internet bandwidth as internet use spikes.

Thierry Breton, the European Commissioner for Internal Market and Services, spoke with Netflix CEO Reed Hastings on Wednesday. The pair discussed the best way to handle the high demands, with Breton urging Hastings to serve only standard definition content during heavy-traffic windows.

Breton and Hastings are scheduled to speak again on Thursday, according to CNN

As the coronavirus spreads and places continue to shut down, more and more people are being forced indoors. Italy’s Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte said today that their country’s lockdown must be extended beyond its original end date of April 3. It’s likely that other countries will follow suit.

So between employees who have been laid off, those working remotely, and kids who can’t return to school due to closures, users have increased amounts of time to spend online, with no clear end in sight. 

Breton believes that both the service providers and users consuming data must take measures to not overflood the systems. 

“Streaming platforms, telecom operators and users, we all have a joint responsibility to take steps to ensure the smooth functioning of the internet during the battle against the virus propagation,” Breton said in a statement.  

The Commission said that while there have been spikes in internet usages there haven’t been any reports of outages or adverse effects yet, but they are preparing nonetheless.

Addressing Concerns

Tech companies themselves are revealing their worries about the heightened strain on their services. Netflix, for instance, agreed with Breton’s intentions. 

“Commissioner Breton is right to highlight the importance of ensuring that the internet continues to run smoothly during this critical time,” a Netflix spokesperson told the Financial Times. “We’ve been focused on network efficiency for many years, including providing our open connect service for free to telecommunications companies.”

Lise Fuhr, the director-general of the European Telecommunications Network Operators’ Association, also agreed with the call for standard definition streaming. 

“At this stage, new traffic patterns are being effectively handled by engineers as per standard network operations,” Fuhr said in a statement. “We support the European Commission’s effort to ensure that national governments and national regulators have all the tools they need to keep networks strong across the continent.”

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg told reporters on Wednesday that his social media company is experiencing “big surges” and that voice and video calls across Whatsapp and Messenger are more than double their usual levels.

“Right now, this isn’t a massive outbreak in the majority of countries around the world yet,” Zuckerberg said. “But if it gets there, then we really need to make sure we are on top of this from an infrastructure perspective, to make sure that things don’t melt down.”

Scott Petty, chief technology officer at Vodafone, a multinational telecommunications company with headquarters in London, told the Financial Times that traffic “peak hour” has now stretched from about noon to 9 p.m.

Petty also pointed to new offers like Disney+ and Universal Pictures’ early releases of select movies in the wake of theaters shutting down that are likely to gain popularity. 

The EU, with the aid of the Body of European Regulators for Electronic Communications (BEREC) will set up a reporting mechanism to monitor Internet traffic surges in each EU country. 

These developments come after the Federal Communications Commission of the United States took its own steps to address users’ Internet concerns. Multiple companies, including AT&T, Comcast, and Verizon, signed the FCC’s Keep Americans Connected Pledge. This agreement lasts for 60 days from its start date — last Friday. It waives any late fees and will not end services of residential or small business owners who can’t pay their bills as the pandemic continues.

See what others are saying: (CNN) (Financial Times) (CNBC

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U.K. Court Rules Julian Assange Can Be Extradited to U.S.

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The judgment overrules a lower court decision that blocked the WikiLeaks founder’s extradition on the grounds that his mental health was not stable enough to weather harsh conditions in the American prison system if convicted.


New Developments in Assange Extradition Battle

A British court ruled Friday that WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange can be extradited to the United States to face charges of violating the Espionage Act that could land him in prison for decades.

Prosecutors in the U.S. have accused Assange of conspiring with former army intelligence analyst Chelsea Manning in 2010 to hack into a Department of Defense computer network and access thousands of military and diplomatic records on the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq.

The information obtained in the hack was later published by WikiLeaks in 2010 and 2011, a move U.S. authorities allege put lives in danger.

In addition to a charge of computer misuse, Assange has also been indicted on 17 espionage charges. Collectively, the charges carry a maximum prison sentence of 175 years.

The Friday decision from the High Court overturns a lower court ruling in January, which found that Assange’s mental health was too fragile for the harsh environment he could face in the U.S. prison system if convicted.

Notably, the January ruling did not determine whether or not Assange was guilty. In fact, District Judge Vanessa Baraitser explicitly rejected the defense’s arguments that the charges against him were politically motivated and that he should be protected under freedom of press.

However, she agreed that the defense had provided compelling evidence that Assange suffers from severe depression and that the conditions he could face in the U.S. prison system were “such that it would be oppressive to extradite him to the United States of America.”

The U.S. appealed the ruling, arguing that Assange’s mental health should not be a barrier to extradition and that the psychiatrist who examined him had been biased. 

In October, the Biden administration vowed that if Assange were to be convicted, he would not be placed in the highest-security U.S. prison or immediately sent to solitary confinement. Officials also said that the native Australian would be eligible to serve his sentence in his home country.

High Court Ruling

The High Court agreed with the administration’s arguments in its ruling, arguing that the American’s assurances regarding the conditions of Assange’s potential incarceration were “sufficient.” 

“There is no reason why this court should not accept the assurances as meaning what they say,” the ruling stated. “There is no basis for assuming that the USA has not given the assurances in good faith.”

Assange’s fiancé, Stella Moris, said in a statement that his legal team would appeal the decision to the British Supreme Court at the “earliest possible moment,” referring to the judgment as a “grave miscarriage of justice.”

The Supreme Court will now decide whether or not to hear the case based on if it believes the matter involves a point of law “of general public importance.” That decision may take weeks or even months.

If the U.K. Supreme Court court objects to hearing Assange’s appeal, he could ask the European Court of Human Rights to stay the extradition — a move that could set in motion another lengthy legal battle in the already drawn-out process.

Assange and his supporters claim he was acting as an investigative journalist when he published the classified military cables. They argue that the possibility of his extradition and prosecution represent serious threats to press freedoms in the U.S.

U.S. prosecutors dispute that Assange acted as a journalist, claiming that he encouraged illegal hacking for personal reasons.

See what others are saying: (The New York Times) (NPR) (The Washington Post)

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Early Data Indicates Omicron is More Transmissible But Less Severe

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The studies come as Pfizer and BioNTech claim that preliminary research shows a third shot of their COVID vaccine appears to provide sufficient protection against the new variant, but two doses alone may not.


More Information About Omicron

Several preliminary studies published in recent days appear to show that the new omicron COVID-19 variant may be more transmissible but less severe than previous strains.

One recent, un-peer-reviewed study by a Japanese scientist who advises the country’s health ministry found that omicron is four times more transmissible in its initial stage than delta was.

Preliminary information in countries hit hard by omicron also indicates high transmissibility. In South Africa —  where the variant was first detected and is already the dominant strain — new COVID cases have more than doubled over the last week.

Health officials in the U.K. said omicron cases are doubling every two or three days, and they expect the strain to become dominant in the country in a matter of weeks.

In a statement Wednesday, World Health Organization Director Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said that while early data does seem to show high transmissibility, it also indicates that omicron causes more mild cases than delta.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevent Director Rochelle Walensky echoed that sentiment, telling reporters that of the 40 known omicron cases in the U.S. as of Wednesday, nearly all of them were mild. One person has been hospitalized so far and none have died.

Studies on Vaccine Efficacy 

Other recent studies have shown that current COVID vaccines are effective at preventing severe illness and death in omicron patients, and boosters provide at least some added protection.

On Wednesday, Pfizer and BioNTech announced that laboratory tests have shown a third dose of their COVID-19 vaccine appears to provide sufficient protection against the omicron variant, though two doses may not.

According to the companies, researchers saw a 25-fold reduction in neutralizing antibodies for omicron compared to other strains of the virus for people who had just two Pfizer doses. 

By contrast, samples from people one month after they had received a Pfizer booster presented neutralizing antibodies against omicron that were comparable to those seen against previous variants after two doses.

Still, Pfizer’s chief executive also told reporters later in the day that omicron could increase the likelihood that people might need a fourth dose earlier than previously expected, which he had initially said was 12 months after the third shot.

Notably, the Pfizer research has not yet been peer-reviewed, and it remains unclear how omicron will operate outside a lab, but other studies have had similar findings.

See what others are saying: (The New York Times) (Bloomberg) (NBC News)

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40 Camels Disqualified From Beauty Contest After Breeders Inject Their Faces With Botox

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The animals were barred from competing for $66 million in prizes at this year’s King Abdulaziz Camel Festival in Saudi Arabia.


Camels Booted From Beauty Contest

More than 40 camels were disqualified from a beauty contest in Saudi Arabia this week after judges found artificial enhancements in their faces, marking the biggest crackdown on contestants in the competition to date.

The animals were competing for $66 million in prizes at the King Abdulaziz Camel Festival, a month-long event that is estimated to include around 33,000 camels.

However, according to The Guardian, they were forced out of the contest when authorities found that breeders had “stretched out the lips and noses of the camels, used hormones to boost the animals’ muscles, injected heads and lips with Botox to make them bigger, inflated body parts with rubber bands, and used fillers to relax their faces.”

Those types of alterations are banned since judges look at the contestant’s heads, necks, humps, posture, and other features when evaluating them.

An announcement from the state-linked Saudi Press Agency said officials used “specialized and advanced” technology to detect tampering.

“The club is keen to halt all acts of tampering and deception in the beautification of camels,” the SPA report added before warning that organizers would “impose strict penalties on manipulators.”

While it’s unclear what that actually entails, this isn’t the first time people have tried to cheat in this way.

In 2018, 12 camels were similarly disqualified from the competition for injections in their noses, lips, and jaw.

See what others are saying: (Insider) (The Guardian) (ABC News)

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