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DHS Suspends Global Entry and Other Trusted Traveler Programs for New Yorkers In Response to Green Light Law

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  • The Department of Homeland Security announced Wednesday that New Yorkers will no longer be able to enroll in several Trusted Traveler Programs, including Global Entry, NEXUS, SENTRI, and FAST. 
  • The DHS says it made this decision because the state’s Green Light Law, which allows undocumented immigrants to get licenses, also blocks DHS groups like ICE and CBP from obtaining New York DMV information. 
  • DHS says they need this information for a number of reasons, including validating people for Trusted Traveler Programs.
  • Many have criticized this move, saying that blocking New Yorkers from these programs will not make travel safer, and could actually put travelers at risk. 

DHS Suspends Trusted Traveler Programs

The Department of Homeland Security is suspending New York residents from enrolling in Global Entry and other Trusted Traveler Programs because of a controversial provision in the state’s newly enacted Green Light Law. 

The Driver’s License Access and Privacy Act, known as the Green Light Law, was passed in the summer and took effect in December. It allows New Yorkers to apply for a state driver’s license or permit “regardless of their citizenship or lawful states in the United States.” In other words, undocumented immigrants can obtain a driver’s license in the state, making it one of 15 states in the country to allow this. 

New York’s Green Light Law has a privacy protection that prevents state DMV information from being shared with agencies that enforce immigration laws, like Immigration and Customs Enforcement and Customs and Border Protection, unless they have a court order. 

Because of this part of the law, DHS says it can no longer allow New Yorkers to take part in several Trusted Traveler Programs. These programs give expedited clearance to pre-approved, low-security travelers arriving to the United States. Programs impacted include Global Entry; NEXUS, which is specifically for those traveling from Canada; SENTRI, for those traveling from Canada or Mexico; and FAST, which is for truck drivers. 

Wolf’s Announcement

Acting Secretary for the Department of Homeland Security Chad Wolf made the announcement while speaking to Tucker Carlson on Fox News Wednesday evening. 

Today, we sent a letter to New York indicating that because they took these measures, that New York residents are no longer allowed to enroll in these Trusted Traveler programs,” he told Carlson.

Fox News also published that letter.

“Over the years, CBP has utilized New York DMV records in several ways to promote national security and to enforce federal customs and immigration laws,” the letter stated. “Having access to New York DMV information has enabled CBP to validate that an individual applying for Trusted Traveler Programs membership qualifies for low-risk status or meets other program requirements.” 

The letter also claimed that ICE and other DHS organizations use information from the state’s DMV to combat crime. 

“Although DHS would prefer to continue our long-standing cooperative relationship with New York on a variety of these critical homeland security initiatives, this Act and the corresponding lack of security cooperation from the New York DMV requires DHS to take immediate action to ensure DHS’s efforts to protect the Homeland are not compromised,” the letter said.

According to a statement from DHS, this will impact somewhere between 150,000 to 200,000 New Yorkers who use these programs. 

Responses

DHS’s announcement came one day after President Donald Trump’s State of the Union address, where he spoke of crimes by immigrants in sanctuary cities. Several reports and studies have indicated there is little correlation between violent crime rates and immigrant populations. 

The news came as a shock to many and received a lot of criticism. Rich Azzopardi, an adviser for New York Governor Andrew Cuomo condemned the choice when speaking with the New York Times.

“This is obviously political retaliation by the federal government, and we’re going to review our legal options,” Azzopardi said. 

Marco Lopez, who was the Chief of Staff at CBP when Global Entry launched, tweeted that it will make airport travel less safe. 

Some did support the announcement, though. After Wolf delivered the news to him, Carlson expressed his approval. 

“Good for you,” Carlson responded. “That will be a shock to a lot of New Yorkers but I support that completely.” 

Others fell in the middle. Rep. Max Rose (R-NY) spoke to Spectrum News saying that while he does not fully support the Green Light Law, he does not agree with DHS’s decision either. 

See what others are saying: (Fox News) (New York Times) (Slate)

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SCOTUS Rules in Favor of Police in Two Qualified Immunity Cases

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The move further solidifies the contentious legal doctrine that protects officers who commit alleged constitutional violations.


SCOTUS Hears Qualified Immunity Cases 

The Supreme Court on Monday ruled in favor of police in two separate cases involving qualified immunity, the controversial legal doctrine that shields officers accused of violating constitutional rights from lawsuits.

The topic has become a major flashpoint in debates over police reform and curbing police violence since the protests against racial injustice and police brutality in the summer of 2020.

On one side, supporters of qualified immunity claim it is necessary to ensure that police can do their jobs without worrying about frivolous lawsuits. 

However, opponents argue that judicial interpretations of the doctrine over time have given police incredibly broad legal immunity for misconduct and use of excessive force. Under a previous Supreme Court ruling, in order for officers to be held liable, plaintiffs have to show that they violated rights “clearly established” by a previous ruling.

In other words, officers cannot be held liable unless there is another case that involves almost identical circumstances.

As a result, many argue the doctrine creates a Catch-22: Officers are shielded from liability because there is no past precedent, but the reason there is no past precedent is because officers are shielded from liability in the first place.

An Ongoing Debate

Critics argue that the two cases the Supreme Court saw Monday illustrate that double bind, as both involved accusations of excessive force commonly levied against police.

In one case, officers used non-lethal bean bag rounds against a suspect and knelt on his back to subdue him. In the other, police shot and killed a suspect after he threatened them with a hammer.

The justices overturned both lower-court rulings without ordering full briefing and argument because of the lack of precedent. The court issued the decisions in unsigned orders with no dissent, signaling they did not even see the cases as close calls. 

Advocates for qualified immunity claim the decisions signal that the current Supreme Court is not open to changing qualified immunity, and the most likely path for opponents of the doctrine is legislation.

While Democrats in Congress have made numerous efforts to limit qualified immunity, including most recently in the George Floyd Justice In Policing Act passed by the House earlier this year, all those attempts have been blocked by Republicans.

At the state level, dozens of bills have been killed after heavy lobbying from police unions. As a result, it remains unclear what path proponents for reform have at this juncture.

See what others are saying: (NPR) (The New York Times) (The Washington Post)

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Florida School Says Students Vaccinated Against COVID-19 Must Stay Home for 30 Days

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The school falsely claimed that people who have just been vaccinated risk “shedding” the coronavirus and could infect others.


Centner Academy Vaccination Policy

A private school in Florida is now requiring all students who get vaccinated against COVID-19 to quarantine for 30 days before returning to class.

According to the local Miami outlet WSVN, Centner Academy wrote a letter to parents last week describing COVID vaccines as “experimental” and citing anti-vaccine misinformation.

“If you are considering the vaccine for your Centner Academy student(s), we ask that you hold off until the Summer when there will be time for the potential transmission or shedding onto others to decrease,” the letter reportedly stated.

“Because of the potential impact on other students and our school community, vaccinated students will need to stay at home for 30 days post-vaccination for each dose and booster they receive and may return to school after 30 days as long as the student is healthy and symptom-free.”

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has debunked the false claim that those newly vaccinated against COVID-19 can “shed” the virus.

According to the agency’s COVID myths page, vaccine shedding “can only occur when a vaccine contains a weakened version of the virus,” but “none of the authorized COVID-19 vaccines in the United States contain the live virus that causes COVID-19. This means that a COVID-19 vaccine cannot make you sick with COVID-19.”

In fact, early research has suggested that vaccinated people are less likely to spread the virus than unvaccinated people.

Beyond that, unvaccinated people are more likely to spread COVID in general because they are much more likely to get the virus than vaccinated people. According to recently published CDC data, as of August, unvaccinated people were six times more likely to get COVID than vaccinated people and 11 times more likely to die from the virus.

Centner Academy Continues Spread of Misinformation

In a statement to The Washington Post Monday, Centner Academy co-founder David Centner doubled down on the school’s new policy, which he described as a “precautionary measure” based on “numerous anecdotal cases that have been in circulation.”

“The school is not opining as to whether unexplained phenomena have a basis in fact, however we prefer to err on the side of caution when making decisions that impact the health of the school community,” he added.

The new rule echoes similar efforts Centner Academy has made that run counter to public health guidance and scientific knowledge.

In April, the school made headlines when its leadership told vaccinated school employees that they were not allowed to be in contact with any students “until more information is known” and encouraged employees to wait until summer to get the jab.

According to The New York Times, the following week, a math and science teacher allegedly told students not to hug their vaccinated parents for more than five seconds.

The outlet also reported that the school’s other co-founder, Leila Centner, discouraged masking, but when state health officials came for routine inspections, teachers said they were directed in a WhatsApp group to put masks on.

See what others are saying: (WSVN) (The Washington Post) (Business Insider)

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Katie Couric Says She Edited Ruth Bader Ginsburg Quote About Athletes Kneeling During National Anthem

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Couric said she omitted part of a 2016 interview in order to “protect” the justice.


Kate Couric Edited Quote From Justice Ginsburg

In her upcoming book, journalist Katie Couric admitted to editing a quote from Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg in 2016 in order to “protect” Ginsberg from potential criticism. 

Couric interviewed the late justice for an article in Yahoo News. During their discussion, she asked Ginsburg about her thoughts on athletes like Colin Kaepernick kneeling for the national anthem to protest racial inequality.

“I think it’s really dumb of them,” Ginsburg is quoted saying in the piece. “Would I arrest them for doing it? No. I think it’s dumb and disrespectful. I would have the same answer if you asked me about flag burning. I think it’s a terrible thing to do, but I wouldn’t lock a person up for doing it. I would point out how ridiculous it seems to me to do such an act.”

According to The Daily Mail and The New York Post, which obtained advance copies of Couric’s book “Going There,” there was more to Ginsburg’s response. Couric wrote that she omitted a portion where Ginsburg said the form of protest showed a “contempt for a government that has made it possible for their parents and grandparents to live a decent life…Which they probably could not have lived in the places they came from.

Couric Says She Lost Sleep Making Choice

“As they became older they realize that this was youthful folly,” Ginsberg reportedly continued. “And that’s why education is important.

According to The Daily Mail, Couric wrote that the Supreme Court’s head of public affairs sent an email asking to remove comments about kneeling because Ginsburg had misspoken. Couric reportedly added that she felt a need to “protect” the justice, thinking she may not have understood the question. Couric reached out to her friend, New York Times reporter David Brooks, regarding the matter and he allegedly likewise believed she may have been confused by the subject. 

Couric also wrote that she was a “big RBG fan” and felt her comments were “unworthy of a crusader for equality.” Because she knew the remarks could land Ginsburg in hot water, she said she “lost a lot of sleep” and felt “conflicted” about whether or not to edit them out. 

Couric was trending on Twitter Wednesday and Thursday as people questioned the ethics behind her choice to ultimately cut part of the quote. Some thought the move showed a lack of journalistic integrity while others thought revealing the story now harmed Ginsburg’s legacy.

See what others are saying: (New York Post) (The Daily Mail) (Insider)

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