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International Demonstrations Call for the End of Violence Against Women

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  • Demonstrators marched in cities all over the world to call for action to end violence against women and show solidarity for those slain by it.
  • The gatherings happened right before the International Day of the Elimination of Violence Against Women, recognized by the United Nations on Nov. 25.
  • The Day also kicks off an international campaign against gender-based violence that will last for 16 days.
  • These movements put pressure on politicians to take legislative action to address this issue.

Global Demonstrations

Thousands of people across the globe spent the weekend demanding the end of violence against women.

Women dressed in soft pastels—the favorite colors of the murdered victims—trod barefoot along the pavement of Ecatepec, Mexico on Saturday to remember those killed by gender-targeted violent acts. Over 5,000 miles away, in Paris, individuals marched through the city wielding banners and wearing face paint to look like blood, condemning domestic violence. Red shoes lined the streets of Brussels on Sunday, symbolizing victims of femicide. 

These movements are only part of a wave of worldwide recognition of the International Day of the Elimination of Violence Against Women, which falls on Nov. 25. The Day was officially recognized by the United Nations to bring attention to the physical and sexual abuse that affects millions of women globally.

“The United Nations is committed to ending all forms of violence against women and girls,” UN Secretary-General António Guterres said in his message to note the Day. “These abuses are among the world’s most horrific, persistent and widespread human rights violations, affecting one in every three women in the world.”

The theme this year is “Orange the World: Generation Equality Stands Against Rape,” because for the next two years, rape will be the focus of the UN’s UNiTe to End Violence Against Women campaign.

International landmarks were turned orange in support.

Nov. 25 also serves as the kick-off date for the international campaign 16 Days of Activism against Gender-Based Violence, coordinated by the Center for Women’s Global Leadership. The campaign concludes on Dec. 10, International Human Rights Day.

Legislative Response 

The demonstrations called for legal action to be taken in response to gender-based violence, and some officials met these demands.

Amid protests in Rome on Saturday, Italian Economy Minister Roberto Gualtieri tweeted that funding for orphans whose mothers were murdered is ready to be approved.

Gualtieri said the funding—12 million euros—is intended to cover medical expenses, scholarships, and training for these kids. He added that the funding does not make up for the “lost affection” of their mothers.

The United States has been reworking its own legislature that addresses gender-based violence. The Violence Against Women Act was passed in 1994 and has been renewed about every five years, but the most recent version has expired. Many politicians are pushing to reauthorize the law, and it is also undergoing changes to be more inclusive. 

The House of Representatives passed a VAWA renewal bill in April, but it is on hold in the Senate. One of the most contentious parts of the bill is the closing of the “boyfriend loophole.” Currently, married men who are convicted of stalking offenses or domestic violence crimes are not legally allowed to buy guns. However, this law does not apply to boyfriends or other non-married partners in intimate relationships. 

“At the end of the day, if we don’t get a bill that can realistically pass the House, pass the Senate and be signed into law, then all we have is a bill,” U.S. Sen. Joni Ernst said to the Des Moines Register. “And no survivors are helped by just bills alone. We need real results.”

U.S. presidential candidate Joe Biden has also expressed support for the reauthorization of VAWA. Biden told The Washington Post that overseeing the implementation of the law in 1994 was the “proudest” moment in his career as a Senator, and said that he will make its reauthorization a priority if he wins the election. 

See what others are saying: (Forbes) (The Washington Post) (UN News)

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Nigerian Gunmen Kidnap Over 300 Students From Boarding School

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  • Gunmen abducted 317 girls from a Nigerian boarding school early Friday morning, making it the second major abduction in the northwest area of the country in over a week.
  • Militants loaded some girls on trucks while others were walked into the nearby Rugu forest, which covers hundreds of miles and is spread over three states.
  • Authorities believe these abductions are being carried out by armed bandit groups seeking random rather than the jihadist groups in the region.
  • According to terror analysts, kidnapping is quickly becoming one of the most thriving industries in Nigeria and has led to 10.5 million Nigerian children being out of school – the most of any nation.

Abductions Before Dawn

Gunmen abducted 317 students early Friday morning from the Nigerian Government Girls Secondary School in Jangebe, Zamfara state.

They entered the building shooting, although it’s clear if anyone was hurt, and forced many girls onto trucks while others into the nearby Rugu forest, which covers hundreds of square miles and crosses multiple states. Some girls escaped, but by morning it was clear to the local community that hundreds were taken.

Zamfara police and security forces, backed by Nigerian army reinforcements, said they are in pursuit of the abductors.

This abduction is the second in a little over a week in the northwest area of the country. At the Kagara Government Science College in Niger state, dozens of schoolboys were abducted on February 17.

In December, 344 boys in Katsina state were also abducted before being freed a week later. At the time, the kidnappers claimed a ransom had been paid, a common motivation for such abductions, but security forces say the children were freed after they had surrounded the group.

Was the Kidnapping for Ransom?

Many abductions have a monetary aspect, with ransoms quickly being demanded; however, it’s currently unclear if Friday’s events were carried out by local bandits looking for a payout or one of the nation’s myriad of jihadist groups that occasionally take hostages.

Most are leaning towards believing this was a kidnapping for ransom due to it quickly becoming the nation’s most thriving industry, according to Bulama Bukarti, a terror analyst and columnist of northern Nigeria’s largest paper.

Unfortunately, the constant kidnapping in less-stable parts of the country, along with economic hardships, have caused parents to pull their children out of schools. Currently, there are more than 10.5 million Nigerian children out of school, the most of any nation. The issue is so prevalent that 1 in 5 of the world’s unschooled children are in Nigeria.

The government has struggled to respond to the rise of kidnappings, with officials both on the civilian side and within the military unsure of how to proceed. On one hand, there are those who want to deal with the issue head-on and attack kidnappers, but others want to try and resolve the issue with dialogue.

See what others are Saying: (NPR) (CNN) (Wall Street Journal)

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Malaysian Man Wins Challenge Against Islamic Law Banning Gay Sex

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  • On Thursday, a Malaysian man in the state of Selangor successfully challenged the state’s Sharia Law ban on gay sex.
  • His legal argument revolved around Malaysia’s two-track legal system that features Sharia Law Courts in some states for certain crimes, and Federal courts for everything else.
  • While the Islamic courts and Sharia law are allowed to regulate divorce, property, religion, and some criminal codes, they cannot enact laws that conflict with Federal law.
  • Malaysia’s top court unanimously found that Selangor’s Islamic-based anti-gay sex law conflicted with the countries rarely-enforced national ban on gay sex.

Malaysia Upholds Federal Law Over Sharia Law

The Malaysian LGBTQ+ community won a major legal victory in the Muslim-majority country on Thursday after a man successfully challenged an Islamic law ban on sex “against the order of nature.”

The case started back in Selangor state when eleven men were arrested for allegedly having sex together in 2018. In 2019, five admitted to the charge and received six strokes by cane, a fine, and jail terms of up to seven months.

But one man, whose name was withheld by his lawyers to protect his identity, challenged the charges. His defense revolved around how Malaysia’s legal system works.

The country, which is 60% Muslim, has both Islamic Sharia law and associated courts in many states, as well as federal laws and courts. The Sharia courts, locally called Syariah courts, are allowed to deal with Islamic law issues such as divorce, property, religion, and certain criminal matters. However, they’re barred from passing laws that conflict with federal law.

The accused pointed out that Malaysia already had an anti-gay sex statute that was leftover from its days as a British colony. The exact same statute can be found throughout former British colonial holdings like India and Pakistan and is known as Section 377.

His argument went on to say that therefore, Selangor shouldn’t have passed its Islamic anti-gay law and the Sharia court didn’t have jurisdiction over the matter.

An Important Victory

Malaysia’s top civil court unanimously agreed, striking down Selangor’s anti-gay sex statute for conflicting with federal law.

The ruling is considered a massive victory for LGBTQ+ people in Malaysia, despite there still being a federal anti-gay statute, because it’s rarely enforced. Similar laws in Muslim states, for instance, are far more restrictive and enforced by their courts. It’s also rare that such legal victories happen in Muslim-majority countries.

Even with this win, there are still other states with Islamic anti-gay statutes, but advocates are now more hopeful and confident about challenging those laws when they’re used again.

See what others are saying: (The Straits Times) (Reuters) (Independent)

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Anti-Asian Hate Crimes on the Rise in British Columbia

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  • A report given to Canadian police in Vancouver, British Columbia last week showed a 717% in hate crimes against Asians over the last year and a 97% increase in hate crimes overall.
  • Prosecutors have been urged to more seriously pursue hate crime charges, despite them being harder to prove in court.
  • The trend has been mirrored in Ontario, another Canadian province with significant Asian populations.

Massive Surges in Hate Crimes

The U.S. has struggled with anti-Asian hate crimes over the last year, especially in municipalities like New York City, which reported upwards of a 1,900% increase from one incident to 19 within the year.

However, the U.S. isn’t the only country dealing with the issue. Similar trends have been reported in Canada as well. A report given to the Vancouver police board last week found that in 2019, there were just 12 incidents of anti-Asian hate crimes reported in the city. In 2020, there was 98, which marks a 717% increase. Those numbers helped drive the stats of hate crimes in the city up 97% overall.

To be clear, crime overall has been on the rise, likely fueled by struggling local economies dealing with the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

Hard To Pursue Charges

The report has caused Solicitor-General Mike Farnworth to push local prosecutors to seek more hate crime charges.

The region has failed to actually bring charges for most reported hate incidents, with the past year only seeing just one charge filed despite police evidence of such hate crimes. The issue at hand is that adding a hate crime charge makes getting a conviction much harder.

The incidents have led to a push for more strict anti-racism legislation in the province, a position that John Horgan, the British Columbian Premier, has pushed for as far back as June 2020.

British Columbia, according to an assortment of Asian-Canadian advocacy groups, has the most incidents of anti-Asian hate crimes, followed by Ontario. This is especially notable because they are the number two and number one locations of Asian populations in Canada, respectively.

See what others are saying: (Vancouver Sun) (CBC) (CTV News)

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