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Trudeau Wins Reelection But Loses Majority

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  • Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau won his reelection, though his Liberal Party suffered significant blows, losing its majority in Parliament.
  • Now, Trudeau will have to work closely with other parties as he leads his new minority government.
  • While many experts believe the Liberals will easily form alliances with other parties, many have also pointed out that minority governments in Canada historically do not last longer than two years.
  • Many viewed the election as a referendum on Trudeau’s character following a corruption scandal and the surfacing of black and brownface pictures.

Canadian Election

Justin Trudeau was reelected as Canadian Prime Minister Monday after his Liberal Party won the most seats in Parliament, but stopped short of keeping its majority. 

According to election results from CBC, Trudeau’s Liberal Party won a total of 157 seats, while the Conservative Party took home 121 seats and smaller parties grabbed the rest.

Source: CBC

While Trudeau and his party won the most seats, they stopped short of receiving the 170 seats necessary to have a majority in Canada’s 338-seat Parliament.

In addition to not getting a majority, the Liberal Party also lost seats that they had previously held as the Conservatives gained more. In 2015, Trudeau was first elected Prime Minister after his party won 184 seats. Conservatives, by contrast, won 99 seats the same year.

As a result, the Prime Minister and his party come out of this election significantly weathered.

Trudeau’s win comes after the embattled leader’s future was jeopardized by separate incidents involving a corruption scandal and leaked photos where he was featured wearing black and brownface.

Past Controversies 

Trudeau first found himself embroiled in corruption accusations in February.

Former justice minister and attorney general Jody Wilson-Raybould, an Indigenous woman, accused the Prime Minister and his aides of pushing her to settle a criminal case with the Canadian engineering and construction firm SNC-Lavalin.

Trudeau argued settling the case would save thousands of jobs because the criminal case against SNC would have prevented it from getting government contracts.

But many Canadians saw the incident as Trudeau— a self-described feminist who has claimed to be an advocate of Indigenous rights— bullying an Indigenous woman to protect a company that financially benefited his own Liberal Party.

Others also felt it was a bad look for Trudeau, who has pushed for government transparency, especially after Parliament’s ethics commissioner found that he broke conflict-of-interest laws.

Then, in September, a series of three black and brownface photos of Trudeau surfaced. That incident drew widespread criticism and prompted many to speculate about his chances in the election.

The leader’s future as Prime Minister seemed up in the air as his Liberal Party polled neck-and-neck with the Conservative Party when voters cast their ballots Monday.

Next Steps

While Trudeau and the Liberals came out on top, the battle for power is far from over.

Unlike some parliamentary systems such as Israel’s, Trudeau does not need a majority to lead the government, meaning he does not need to formally build coalitions with other parties to get that majority. Instead, he will just lead a minority government.

While minority governments are not uncommon in Canada, it still puts Trudeau in a pretty dicey position.

As many have noted, minority governments in the country often do not last for longer than two years, so Trudeau will have to fight hard to maintain power.

It also means that he will need the support of other parties to pass legislation— something he did not necessarily need before when he had an outright majority.

That said, because the Liberals are only 13 seats short of a majority, Trudeau would really only need the support of one of the other mid-sized parties to pass legislation. As a result, many experts believe that the Liberals should be able to find allies.

“He should be able to put together some kind of agenda where he can get the support he needs on an issue-by-issue basis,” Lori Williams, a political analyst at Mount Royal University in Calgary told The Wall Street Journal.

Potential Alliances

Arguably the most logical partner for the Liberals is the left-wing New Democratic Party (NDP), which won 24 seats.

Though further to the left than Trudeau’s party, the NDP has a history of working with the Liberals to keep power. In 2005, the NDP helped prop up a Liberal minority government to prevent being defeated by Conservatives.

Now, the two parties again have a vested interest in working together to keep conservatives out of power. The NDP additionally has a big incentive to prevent another election because they lost nearly half their seats in this election.

Speaking to supporters Tuesday, NDP leader Jagmeet Singh said his party would play a “constructive and positive role in the new Parliament.”

Trudeau could also find an ally in the Bloc Québécois, a party that promotes Quebec’s independence from Canada, which went from just 10 seats to 32 this election.

The Bloc’s leader, Yves-François Blanchet, also said Tuesday that his party would be open to working with the Liberals. 

“If what is being proposed is good for Québéc, you can count on us,” he said.

Notably, both the Bloc and the NDP are generally in line with one of Trudeau’s biggest legislative issues: climate change.

Speaking Monday night in his acceptance speech, Trudeau thanked Canadians for their votes.

“From coast to coast, tonight, Canadians rejected division and negativity. They rejected cuts and austerity, and they voted in favour of a progressive agenda and strong action on climate change,” he said.  

“I have heard you, my friends. You are sending our Liberal team back to work; back to Ottawa with a clear mandate,” he continued. “We will make life more affordable. We will continue to fight climate change. We will get guns off our streets and we will keep investing in Canadians.”

Despite their win, the election has taken a big toll on the Liberal Party and put Trudeau in a fragile situation. Already, Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer seems to be eyeing Trudeau’s spot.

“Conservatives have put Justin Trudeau on notice,” Scheer said in a concession speech Monday night. “And Mr. Trudeau, when your government falls, Conservatives will be ready and we will win.”

See what others are saying: (CBC) (The Wall Street Journal) (The New York Times)

International

Malaysian Man Wins Challenge Against Islamic Law Banning Gay Sex

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  • On Thursday, a Malaysian man in the state of Selangor successfully challenged the state’s Sharia Law ban on gay sex.
  • His legal argument revolved around Malaysia’s two-track legal system that features Sharia Law Courts in some states for certain crimes, and Federal courts for everything else.
  • While the Islamic courts and Sharia law are allowed to regulate divorce, property, religion, and some criminal codes, they cannot enact laws that conflict with Federal law.
  • Malaysia’s top court unanimously found that Selangor’s Islamic-based anti-gay sex law conflicted with the countries rarely-enforced national ban on gay sex.

Malaysia Upholds Federal Law Over Sharia Law

The Malaysian LGBTQ+ community won a major legal victory in the Muslim-majority country on Thursday after a man successfully challenged an Islamic law ban on sex “against the order of nature.”

The case started back in Selangor state when eleven men were arrested for allegedly having sex together in 2018. In 2019, five admitted to the charge and received six strokes by cane, a fine, and jail terms of up to seven months.

But one man, whose name was withheld by his lawyers to protect his identity, challenged the charges. His defense revolved around how Malaysia’s legal system works.

The country, which is 60% Muslim, has both Islamic Sharia law and associated courts in many states, as well as federal laws and courts. The Sharia courts, locally called Syariah courts, are allowed to deal with Islamic law issues such as divorce, property, religion, and certain criminal matters. However, they’re barred from passing laws that conflict with federal law.

The accused pointed out that Malaysia already had an anti-gay sex statute that was leftover from its days as a British colony. The exact same statute can be found throughout former British colonial holdings like India and Pakistan and is known as Section 377.

His argument went on to say that therefore, Selangor shouldn’t have passed its Islamic anti-gay law and the Sharia court didn’t have jurisdiction over the matter.

An Important Victory

Malaysia’s top civil court unanimously agreed, striking down Selangor’s anti-gay sex statute for conflicting with federal law.

The ruling is considered a massive victory for LGBTQ+ people in Malaysia, despite there still being a federal anti-gay statute, because it’s rarely enforced. Similar laws in Muslim states, for instance, are far more restrictive and enforced by their courts. It’s also rare that such legal victories happen in Muslim-majority countries.

Even with this win, there are still other states with Islamic anti-gay statutes, but advocates are now more hopeful and confident about challenging those laws when they’re used again.

See what others are saying: (The Straits Times) (Reuters) (Independent)

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Anti-Asian Hate Crimes on the Rise in British Columbia

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  • A report given to Canadian police in Vancouver, British Columbia last week showed a 717% in hate crimes against Asians over the last year and a 97% increase in hate crimes overall.
  • Prosecutors have been urged to more seriously pursue hate crime charges, despite them being harder to prove in court.
  • The trend has been mirrored in Ontario, another Canadian province with significant Asian populations.

Massive Surges in Hate Crimes

The U.S. has struggled with anti-Asian hate crimes over the last year, especially in municipalities like New York City, which reported upwards of a 1,900% increase from one incident to 19 within the year.

However, the U.S. isn’t the only country dealing with the issue. Similar trends have been reported in Canada as well. A report given to the Vancouver police board last week found that in 2019, there were just 12 incidents of anti-Asian hate crimes reported in the city. In 2020, there was 98, which marks a 717% increase. Those numbers helped drive the stats of hate crimes in the city up 97% overall.

To be clear, crime overall has been on the rise, likely fueled by struggling local economies dealing with the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

Hard To Pursue Charges

The report has caused Solicitor-General Mike Farnworth to push local prosecutors to seek more hate crime charges.

The region has failed to actually bring charges for most reported hate incidents, with the past year only seeing just one charge filed despite police evidence of such hate crimes. The issue at hand is that adding a hate crime charge makes getting a conviction much harder.

The incidents have led to a push for more strict anti-racism legislation in the province, a position that John Horgan, the British Columbian Premier, has pushed for as far back as June 2020.

British Columbia, according to an assortment of Asian-Canadian advocacy groups, has the most incidents of anti-Asian hate crimes, followed by Ontario. This is especially notable because they are the number two and number one locations of Asian populations in Canada, respectively.

See what others are saying: (Vancouver Sun) (CBC) (CTV News)

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Japan Appoints ‘Minister of Loneliness’ To Combat Rising Suicide Rates

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  • Earlier this month, Japan appointed Sakamoto Tetsushi as the country’s Minister of Loneliness, tasked with addressing rising suicide rates.
  • Suicides were declining worldwide, except in the U.S., ahead of the coronavirus pandemic but have since seen startling spikes.
  • In October, Japan reported 400 more suicide deaths than all COVID-19 related deaths in the nation until that point.
  • While suicide cases among men in Japan are higher, the country has seen a drastic increase in suicides among women, who are more likely to have unstable work that is susceptible to market disruptions from the coronavirus.

Editor’s Note: The Japanese government has asked Western outlets to adhere to Japanese naming conventions. To that end, Japanese names will be written as Family Name followed by Given Name.

Loneliness Is a Rising Issue

Japanese Prime Minister Suga Yoshinori appointed Sakamoto Tetsushi as its Minister of Loneliness earlier this month.

Sakamoto is already in charge of combating Japan’s declining birthrate and regional revitalization efforts, but his new role will see him combating Japan’s rising suicide rate. Suicides were actually on the decline in Japan until the COVID-19 pandemic, which has drastically exacerbated the issue.

That trend reached a milestone in October 2020 when Japan suffered 2,153 suicides – nearly 400 more than all COVID-19 related deaths in Japan until that point. Currently, monthly suicides no longer exceed the total amount of deaths from COVID-19, as Japan faced an outbreak at the end of the year and has over 7,500 COVID-19 deaths.

Even though monthly suicides no longer outstrip total coronavirus deaths, the rate hasn’t let up. While men still make up the vast majority of suicides, there’s been a drastic increase in women taking their own lives. Between October 2020 and October 2019 there was a 70% increase in female suicides.

According to Ueda Michiko, a Japanese professor at Waseda University who studies suicides, women are particularly affected because they often have more unstable employment that is more susceptible to disruptions caused by the pandemic.

She went to tell Insider, “A lot of women are not married anymore. They have to support their own lives and they don’t have permanent jobs. So, when something happens, of course, they are hit very, very hard.”

Internationally Suicides on the Rise

Sakamoto hasn’t outlined any specific plans to combat loneliness in Japan, but he has a blueprint to work from as he’s not the world’s first Minister of Loneliness. The U.K. appointed one in 2018 after a report found more than 9 million Brits said that they often or always felt lonely.

But the job doesn’t seem very easy or desirable, as the U.K. has gone through three ministers of loneliness since then.

COVID-19 has been a massive disruption to suicide rates globally, which had actually been steadily declining for decades. The notable exception to this is the United States, which has faced increases nearly every year since 1999 adding up to almost a 30% total increase over the past two decades.

If you’re in the U.S. and feeling suicidal or have thoughts of suicide contact the National Suicide Hotline at 1-800-273-8255.

For reader across the globe, here are resources in your nation.

See what others are saying: (The Hill) (NDTV) (Insider)

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