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Parliament Blocks Boris Johnson From Executing No-Deal Brexit

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  • British Parliament successfully passed a bill that blocks the U.K. from leaving the EU without a deal ahead of the U.K.’s Oct. 31 Brexit deadline.
  • The House of Commons denied Prime Minister Boris Johnson a chance to hold snap elections for the second time.
  • Parliament has now been suspended until Oct. 19, per Johnson’s request. Opposition lawmakers openly protested the suspension in the House of Commons on Monday.

No-Deal Brexit Block

British Parliament passed a law preventing the United Kingdom from leaving the European Union on Monday ahead of its current Oct. 31 deadline. Lawmakers also passed an order forcing Prime Minister Boris Johnson to release private communications about his Brexit plans and blocked his second attempt to hold snap elections.

Last week, the House of Commons passed a first version of the bill after taking control of the House away from Johnson. After being sent to the House of Lords, it was then passed again and sent back to the Commons, which approved final amendments. The bill was finally enacted into law after receiving formal assent from Queen Elizabeth II. 

The passage of the law means Johnson may be forced to go back to the EU and ask for an extension to the current Oct. 31 deadline, something Johnson has repeatedly said he will not do.

Many now fear Johnson will attempt to find a loophole or challenge the law in court after he said Monday he would not allow the U.K. to remain in the EU following the deadline. Others have speculated Johnson might attempt to ignore the law altogether. 

Despite this, Johnson said Monday that a no-deal Brexit would be a failure of the state, saying he would be partially to blame.

“I want to get a deal,” Johnson said in a press conference with the Irish Prime Minister. “Like you, I have looked carefully at no-deal. I have assessed its consequences… and yes, of course, we could do it. The U.K. could certainly get through it, but be in no doubt that outcome would be a failure of statecraft for which we would all be responsible.” 

Second Vote for Elections

Johnson also held another vote for elections after a vote in the Commons last week failed to garner the two-thirds majority needed to pass; however, this vote similarly failed to attract that majority.

Johnson has argued he wants the British people to decide how lawmakers handle Brexit through elections, which would open up all 650 seats in the House of Commons three years early. That would also include his own position as prime minister.

Labour Party Leader Jeremy Corbyn said he is eager to hold elections but wants the party to focus on ensuring a no-deal is fully blocked ahead of the October deadline. Many lawmakers, however, said they expect elections to be held by the end of the year.

Vote Over Johnson’s Private Communications

The Commons held another vote that requires Johnson to hand over private communications about his Brexit plans. 

The order comes after Johnson requested to suspend or “prorogue” parliament an additional week on top of an already scheduled recess. It primarily seeks to investigate why he issued the suspension, which will limit the time lawmakers have to discuss a Brexit deal. 

While Johnson has said the prorogue was called to create a “bold” new domestic agenda following Brexit, opposition lawmakers have rebuked the claim and denounced it as a power-grab by Johnson to be able to execute a no-deal, if necessary. 

“We will consider the implications of this vote and respond in due course,” a spokesperson for Johnson said after calling the information request “disproportionate and unprecedented.”

Parliament is Suspended

Following Monday’s votes, parliament was suspended until Oct. 14. That means it will only have a little more than two weeks to agree on a deal before it reaches the Oct. 31 deadline. 

Notably, the law barring a no-deal Brexit will force Johnson to ask the EU to extend the Brexit deadline until January if a deal is not reached by Oct. 19. 

A day prior to that, Johnson will attend an EU summit in Brussels where he will try to strike a deal. 

During the traditional prorogation proceedings, many opposition lawmakers broke formality and jeered, chanting “Shame on you!” and holding signs that read, “Silenced,” in reference to Johnson’s suspension.

Before the suspension began, House Speaker John Bercow announced he will be resigning on Oct. 31. Bercow is known for his flamboyant remarks during House proceedings.

“This is not a standard or normal prorogation,” he said Monday. 

See what others are saying: (CNBC) (BBC) (Wall Street Journal)

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Trudeau Wins Reelection But Loses Majority

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  • Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau won his reelection, though his Liberal Party suffered significant blows, losing its majority in Parliament.
  • Now, Trudeau will have to work closely with other parties as he leads his new minority government.
  • While many experts believe the Liberals will easily form alliances with other parties, many have also pointed out that minority governments in Canada historically do not last longer than two years.
  • Many viewed the election as a referendum on Trudeau’s character following a corruption scandal and the surfacing of black and brownface pictures.

Canadian Election

Justin Trudeau was reelected as Canadian Prime Minister Monday after his Liberal Party won the most seats in Parliament, but stopped short of keeping its majority. 

According to election results from CBC, Trudeau’s Liberal Party won a total of 157 seats, while the Conservative Party took home 121 seats and smaller parties grabbed the rest.

Source: CBC

While Trudeau and his party won the most seats, they stopped short of receiving the 170 seats necessary to have a majority in Canada’s 338-seat Parliament.

In addition to not getting a majority, the Liberal Party also lost seats that they had previously held as the Conservatives gained more. In 2015, Trudeau was first elected Prime Minister after his party won 184 seats. Conservatives, by contrast, won 99 seats the same year.

As a result, the Prime Minister and his party come out of this election significantly weathered.

Trudeau’s win comes after the embattled leader’s future was jeopardized by separate incidents involving a corruption scandal and leaked photos where he was featured wearing black and brownface.

Past Controversies 

Trudeau first found himself embroiled in corruption accusations in February.

Former justice minister and attorney general Jody Wilson-Raybould, an Indigenous woman, accused the Prime Minister and his aides of pushing her to settle a criminal case with the Canadian engineering and construction firm SNC-Lavalin.

Trudeau argued settling the case would save thousands of jobs because the criminal case against SNC would have prevented it from getting government contracts.

But many Canadians saw the incident as Trudeau— a self-described feminist who has claimed to be an advocate of Indigenous rights— bullying an Indigenous woman to protect a company that financially benefited his own Liberal Party.

Others also felt it was a bad look for Trudeau, who has pushed for government transparency, especially after Parliament’s ethics commissioner found that he broke conflict-of-interest laws.

Then, in September, a series of three black and brownface photos of Trudeau surfaced. That incident drew widespread criticism and prompted many to speculate about his chances in the election.

The leader’s future as Prime Minister seemed up in the air as his Liberal Party polled neck-and-neck with the Conservative Party when voters cast their ballots Monday.

Next Steps

While Trudeau and the Liberals came out on top, the battle for power is far from over.

Unlike some parliamentary systems such as Israel’s, Trudeau does not need a majority to lead the government, meaning he does not need to formally build coalitions with other parties to get that majority. Instead, he will just lead a minority government.

While minority governments are not uncommon in Canada, it still puts Trudeau in a pretty dicey position.

As many have noted, minority governments in the country often do not last for longer than two years, so Trudeau will have to fight hard to maintain power.

It also means that he will need the support of other parties to pass legislation— something he did not necessarily need before when he had an outright majority.

That said, because the Liberals are only 13 seats short of a majority, Trudeau would really only need the support of one of the other mid-sized parties to pass legislation. As a result, many experts believe that the Liberals should be able to find allies.

“He should be able to put together some kind of agenda where he can get the support he needs on an issue-by-issue basis,” Lori Williams, a political analyst at Mount Royal University in Calgary told The Wall Street Journal.

Potential Alliances

Arguably the most logical partner for the Liberals is the left-wing New Democratic Party (NDP), which won 24 seats.

Though further to the left than Trudeau’s party, the NDP has a history of working with the Liberals to keep power. In 2005, the NDP helped prop up a Liberal minority government to prevent being defeated by Conservatives.

Now, the two parties again have a vested interest in working together to keep conservatives out of power. The NDP additionally has a big incentive to prevent another election because they lost nearly half their seats in this election.

Speaking to supporters Tuesday, NDP leader Jagmeet Singh said his party would play a “constructive and positive role in the new Parliament.”

Trudeau could also find an ally in the Bloc Québécois, a party that promotes Quebec’s independence from Canada, which went from just 10 seats to 32 this election.

The Bloc’s leader, Yves-François Blanchet, also said Tuesday that his party would be open to working with the Liberals. 

“If what is being proposed is good for Québéc, you can count on us,” he said.

Notably, both the Bloc and the NDP are generally in line with one of Trudeau’s biggest legislative issues: climate change.

Speaking Monday night in his acceptance speech, Trudeau thanked Canadians for their votes.

“From coast to coast, tonight, Canadians rejected division and negativity. They rejected cuts and austerity, and they voted in favour of a progressive agenda and strong action on climate change,” he said.  

“I have heard you, my friends. You are sending our Liberal team back to work; back to Ottawa with a clear mandate,” he continued. “We will make life more affordable. We will continue to fight climate change. We will get guns off our streets and we will keep investing in Canadians.”

Despite their win, the election has taken a big toll on the Liberal Party and put Trudeau in a fragile situation. Already, Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer seems to be eyeing Trudeau’s spot.

“Conservatives have put Justin Trudeau on notice,” Scheer said in a concession speech Monday night. “And Mr. Trudeau, when your government falls, Conservatives will be ready and we will win.”

See what others are saying: (CBC) (The Wall Street Journal) (The New York Times)

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Violent Protests Erupt in Chile Over Social Inequality

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  • Massive protests have broken out all over Chile, leaving at least 11 dead and 1,500 arrested.
  • The protests started over a transit fare hike, but have evolved to address broader economic issues such as rising costs for the poor and middle class.
  • The Chilean president declared a state of emergency and deployed the military, marking the first time anyone has done so since the dictatorship ended in 1990.

Protests Break Out

Large protests all over Chile rocked the country over the weekend, prompting President Sebastián Piñera to declare a state of emergency in numerous cities.

The protests started last Monday when hundreds of students swarmed several subway stations in the capital Santiago to hop turnstiles in protest of a transit fare hike.

The hike, which went into effect Oct. 6, followed other fare increases earlier this year.

While the protests started over fares, they quickly became about broader economic issues in the country.

Chile has become one of the wealthiest countries in South America, but it is also one of the most unequal economically. For poor and middle-class families, the cost of living has been rising while wages have remained the same.

Protestors are also blaming rising costs in part on widespread privatization policies. Healthcare, education, and many utilities have seen rising costs. Meanwhile, low wages have caused pension payouts to remain low because of poor contributions.

High prices for gas and electricity have also caused transportation costs to rise, which is significant because one of the highest costs for middle and low-income individuals is transportation.

According to The New York Times, for a person making an average monthly salary, about a fifth of that is spent on transportation costs.

Meanwhile, Piñera has an estimated net worth of $2.8 billion according to Forbes.

Protests Escalate

By Friday, the protests had escalated, with students damaging turnstiles, smashing glass, and vandalizing stations.

Videos also showed them throwing large objects like sheet metal onto subway tracks, and it was also reported that they set fires and barricades at metro station entrances. Subway services were canceled entirely all across Santiago.

The protests began to shift to the streets, with demonstrators setting fires and looting stores. Riot police reportedly responded by using tear gas and hitting protestors with batons, while armored military vehicles used water cannons to push demonstrators back.

Piñera addressed the violence late Friday by imposing a curfew and a state of emergency in Santiago, placing the military in charge of security in the city.

That declaration marked the first time that the military had been deployed to the streets for nearly 30 years, since the end of the dictatorship of Augusto Pinochet in 1990.

During the nearly 17-year-long regime, a military junta patrolled the streets and committed mass human rights abuses, arresting, kidnapping, torturing, and murdering dissidents and others, many of whom were labeled “disappeared” by the government.

Piñera’s declaration prompted many to draw comparisons to military rule under Pinochet. However, the demonstrations still continued Saturday, with the protests spreading to several other cities across the country.

On Saturday night, Piñera announced that he was suspending the fare increase.

“I have listened with humility and with great attention to the voice of my compatriots,” he said in a televised statement.

Sunday Protests

That did not stop the protestors, who continued Sunday.

Some protests remained peaceful, with demonstrators banging on pots and pans and waving pictures of people who had been disappeared during the dictatorship.

Others, however, engaged in more violent tactics, continuing to set fires and loot stores. Police also continued to respond by firing tear gas, water cannons, and rubber bullets at protestors.

Shops and offices were forced to close, and flights were canceled or delayed at Santiago international airport. 

As of Sunday night, 11 people had been killed in the violence. According to reports three people were killed on Saturday, while eight people were killed in fires on Sunday. Many more civilians and police have been injured.

The government has also claimed that 1,500 people have been arrested, which is significant because Piñera has said he will invoke the State Security Law to prosecute people involved in the attacks on the subways. That law carries prison sentences of three to five years.

On Sunday night, the state of emergency was extended to five other cities, and Piñera said he would extend it to more on Monday.

While speaking during a televised address Piñera said, “We are at war against a powerful enemy, who is willing to use violence without any limits.”

Those words angered many Chileans for two main reasons. First, they echoed a similar declaration made by Pinochet. Second, labeling protestors as criminals shows them that he does not actually care about their concerns, which go way beyond the fare hike.

Now, many are speculating his words will just further feed the flames.

With Santiago still in a state of emergency, a lot of the city still remained shut down with schools closed on Monday.

Also on Monday, Chilean authorities attempted to clear the wreckage and re-open public transportation. Protesters, meanwhile, have called for a general strike to take place.

See what others are saying: (The Washington Post) (BBC) (VICE)

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Boris Johnson Strikes Brexit Deal With EU. Will It Move Through Parliament?

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  • British Prime Minister Boris Johnson agreed to a new Brexit deal with the European Union on Thursday.
  • The deal would get rid of the contentious Irish backstop, but it would create a hard border between Northern Ireland and the rest of the U.K.
  • Johnson is expected to hold a vote on the deal in British Parliament on Saturday, but both opposition Labour Party Leader Jeremy Corbyn and the Democratic Unionist Party of Northern Ireland oppose it.
  • If the deal fails, Johnson will likely need to go back to the EU and ask for an extension to the U.K.’s current Oct. 31 Brexit deadline.

Johnson and EU Agree to a New Deal

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson agreed to a new Brexit deal with the European Union Thursday, which notably removes the Irish backstop but adds a controversial Northern Irish-only backstop.

“We’ve got a great new deal that takes back control,” Johnson said on Twitter. “Now Parliament should get Brexit done on Saturday so we can move on to other priorities like the cost of living, the NHS, violent crime and our environment.”

The new deal comes after Johnson said he would negotiate a better deal than the EU offered former prime minister Theresa May. however, the EU previously said it wouldn’t negotiate a different deal.

All of that happened while Johnson lost his majority in British Parliament, as he kicked out members of his own party, and as parliament voted to prevent him from leaving the EU without a deal.

Notably, removing the United Kingdom from the EU has been one of Johnson’s major promises, and he originally said that would happen by the current Oct. 31 deadline with or without a deal.

What’s in the New Brexit Deal?

The new deal provides several key provisions that Johnson hopes will pass parliament’s scrutiny. First and most notably, the deal scraps the massively contentious Irish backstop.

The United Kingdom is composed of four countries: England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland. The controversy surrounding the backstop specifically deals with Northern Ireland, which is on the same island as the independent Republic of Ireland. 

Right now, there is no hard border between those two countries, meaning there are no customs checks for goods crossing between the border. Under May’s deal, that soft border would have remained, but this was actually one of the big reasons her deal failed three times in parliament. Members of parliament believed this backstop would have essentially kept the UK in the EU.

Second, the new deal creates a new Northern Ireland-only backstop, which can become confusing since Northern Ireland is part of the U.K. Basically, the deal sets up a special arrangement where Northern Ireland would still remain subject to certain EU regulations, including agriculture, value-added tax on goods, excise duties, and state aid rules.

That, in turn, would prevent a hard border between Ireland and Northern Ireland, but it would result in a hard border between Northern Ireland and the rest of the U.K., meaning that there would be customs checks and different regulations between the two which could lead to additional trade costs for the U.K.

Another caveat to the deal would also eventually give Northern Ireland lawmakers the chance to decide on whether or not they want to stay so closely aligned with the EU in the future.

Third, while the U.K. would leave the EU, it would still continue to apply EU rules until the end of next year. That time will be seen as a transition period meant to soften the split, especially since the deal does not look to the future relationship between the U.K. and the EU.

The period is meant to give them time to work out a trade deal, among other provisions, and it could be extended by up to two years if both sides agree they need more time. As far as May’s deal, this aspect is similar to her agreement.

Unlike May’s deal, this deal is non-binding, meaning the EU has the ability to change its mind.

Will the Deal Pass?

One of the major questions following the announcement of the agreement was whether or not the bill can stand against a parliament that has rejected Brexit votes multiple times. 

The removal of the Irish backstop is expected to be a sticking point for a lot of pro-Brexit Conservative MP’s, and a few opposition Labour Party MPs have expressed support. 

Johnson is expected to vote on the deal on Saturday, and if it does pass, the U.K. could actually meet its end of the month deadline.

But, it’s not going to be that easy. Many MPs from other parties have already said they will refuse to back the deal.

“From what we know, it seems the Prime Minister has negotiated an even worse deal than Theresa May’s,” Labour Party Leader Jeremy Corbyn said.

The Liberal Democrats have also said they are opposed to the deal and have echoed Corbyn’s call for a second referendum as to whether the U.K. should even leave the EU. Brexit Party Leader Nigel Farage said he’s not voting for the deal, either.

If that’s not enough, the pro-British Democratic Unionist Party of Northern Ireland issued their opposition to the deal, as well. That could make or break the deal’s passage as the DUP is a key ally for Johnson.

“These proposals are not, in our view, beneficial to the economic well-being of Northern Ireland and they undermine the integrity of the Union,” the party’s statement reads. 

Specifically, the party is not happy with Northern Ireland functioning as a hard border between the EU and the rest of the U.K.

Johnson’s deal, however, has been well-received outside of Britain among leaders of other EU countries. The President of the European Commission Jean-Claude Juncker, Germany’s Chancellor Angela Merkel, and France’s President Emmanuel Macron all expressed support for the deal and moving it forward.

Leo Varadkar, Prime Minister of Ireland, also agreed the deal was fair and said the deal solves the issue with Northern Ireland.

“[It] also creates a unique solution for Northern Ireland recognising the unique history and geography of Northern Ireland, one which ensures there is no hard border between north and south,” he said. 

If the deal ultimately passes through British Parliament, it will need to be approved by EU leaders in the European Parliament to bind them to the agreement.

If the deal fails, Johnson will be forced to ask the EU for an extension until the end of January. Though there’s been a lot of concern over whether he would actually do that, a secretary for Johnson has now said he will comply with the law.

See what others are saying: (Business Insider) (Washington Post) (The Guardian)

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