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CDC and FDA Urge People to Stop Vaping While It Investigates 5 Potentially-Linked Deaths

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  • The CDC and the FDA are temporarily urging people to stop vaping after five deaths were potentially linked to the use of e-cigarettes.
  • The CDC also said it received 450 cases suspected to be a result of vaping-related illnesses.
  • Over recent months, some city and state governments have taken measures to ban either the sale of all e-cigarettes or the sale of flavored vaping products.

Vaping Illnesses and First Deaths

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Food and Drug Administration are asking people to stop using e-cigarettes, at least temporarily, following reports of five deaths possibly tied to vaping-related illnesses.

Specifically, the FDA is warning people not to use cannabis vaping products following a statement from the New York State Department of Health last week. In the statement, the department said it potentially linked 34 cases of “severe” pulmonary illness to an oil found in cannabis vaping products.

The warnings come after the reported deaths an adult in Indiana, a 55-year-old adult in California, and a 65-year-old in Minnesota. So far, officials have only linked cannabis vaping use with the individual from Minnesota, who was already known to have a history of lung disease.

The reports also follow two deaths from Illinois and Oregon. 

“When you think about it, these e-cigarette devices are really like chemistry sets,” Dr. Jonathan LaPook told CBS News. “You put in this liquid, you lick it, you heat it up – there’s some kind of chemical reaction. You’re creating all these different chemicals. You’re not entirely sure what these chemicals are, but we are sure of one thing: You are sucking a lot of them.”

Notably, the New York State Department of Health says it believes some of the products in its investigation may be counterfeits of the state’s medically-approved marijuana, though the person who died in Oregon appears to have purchased the product legally. Because of this, officials aren’t sure if this is a problem with legal vaping products, off-the-street vaping products, or both.

Federal health officials have also now logged 450 cases across 33 states suspected to be from vaping-related illnesses.

Monday morning, the FDA issued a warning letter to Juul for “engag[ing] in labeling, advertising, and/or other activities directed to consumers, in which JUUL explicitly and/or implicitly has represented that JUUL products are free of a substance, have a reduced level of or exposure to a substance, and/or that JUUL products present a lower risk of tobacco-related disease or are less harmful than one or more other commercially marketed tobacco products.”

A String of Illnesses

In April, health departments in Illinois and Wisconsin followed 53 patients who had vaped, with a third of those people ending up on respirators.

In August, the Washington Post reported that “Within days, [one man] had gone from being a 20-year-old hiking enthusiast to being kept alive by two machines forcing air into and out of his lungs and oxygenating his blood outside of his body.”

Around the same time, the CDC was reportedly investigating almost 200 vaping-related respiratory illnesses.

In the New York State Department of Health investigation, health officials believe some of the illnesses may result from vitamin E acetate, an oil derived from vitamin E and used in cannabis vaping products.

While the health department said patients in the case had used a variety of vaping products, all of them admitted to using cannabis-vaping products.

Vitamin E acetate is a product found in foods like canola oil and almonds. It is safe to eat and apply to the skin, but health officials fear it may be dangerous to inhale. Oils are naturally fatty substances, and the lungs are unable to process them, meaning that when the oil is breathed into the lungs as a vapor, it soon cools down and liquefies in the lungs.

Neighboring immune cells will then work to get rid of the fatty oil, potentially leading to inflammation and difficulty breathing. Other symptoms include vomiting, nausea, and diarrhea. 

As of yet, no agency has concluded that vitamin E acetate is responsible for the illnesses. The FDA is also investigating other possible contributing agents like TCH, nicotine, synthetic cannabinoids, pesticides, or opioids. 

“No one substance, including vitamin E acetate, has been identified in all of the samples,” the FDA said in a statement. 

Regulating E-Cigarettes

E-cigarettes have raised the eyebrows of health officials since the product exploded onto the market without FDA approval. 

Vaping companies like Juul have marketed their products as healthier than cigarettes and have promoted them as tracks to quit smoking altogether.

In June, San Francisco banned the sale of e-cigarettes. 

Last week, the governor of Michigan used executive authority to ban flavored nicotine vaping products. That order will last six months, and it’s largely been seen as an attempt to keep e-cigarettes out of kids’ hands, with people arguing that fun flavors get kids addicted. Others, however, have argued that the flavors could help adults quit smoking tobacco cigarettes. 

On Monday,  reports surfaced of an Alabama school removing some of the stall doors from a boys’ restroom to stop teens from using e-cigarettes in school. Many people then called the move excessive, but the principal said he’d already found a student passed out after vaping too much.

See what others are saying: (Washington Post) (CNBC) (The independent)

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How Safe Injections Sites in the U.S. Are Fighting Back Against The Opioid Crisis & Do They Work?

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America has been hit with a historical opioid crisis. In 2018, more than 31,000 people died from opioid overdoses, which is more than any previous year recorded in American history. Healthcare professionals and public health experts are offering alternatives to the status quo treatments, which leads us to today’s topic: supervised injection facilities (SIF). 

Also known as overdose prevention sites and medically supervised injection centers, SIF’s have been proposed as a solution to combat America’s opioid problem. In these centers, no drugs are supplied to the users—they bring their own and are given clean syringes to prevent bloodborne diseases. Advocates or these sites are saying that they would stop countless fatal overdoses because there would be medical staff on site. Countries like Switzerland, Canada, and Australia have implemented versions of these facilities and so far there has not been any reported fatal overdoses at a SIF in the world. 

While cities like Seattle, San Francisco, New York City, and Philadelphia have all proposed plans to make sites, they have been met with heavy opposition. The federal government opposed these sites because they claim it breaks federal laws and some residents in these cities are against them due to concerns over attracting more crime. In this video, we’ll be focusing on Philadelphia, as it might become the first U.S. city to legally open a supervised injection facility, along with the court case between the non-profit who is trying to establish the SIF and the federal government.

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Elon Musk Defends Calling Rescue Diver “Pedo Guy” in Lawsuit

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  • In court documents, Elon Musk defended a tweet where he called a diver who helped rescue the Thai soccer team from a cave a “pedo guy” because it “was a common insult used in South Africa.” 
  • The diver sued Musk for defamation last year after Musk sent an email to BuzzFeed where he referred to the diver as “child rapist” who had taken a “child bride who was about 12 years old.” 
  • The court documents from the suit, which were made public Monday, also revealed that Musk paid a private investigator more than $50,000 to look into the diver.
  • Musk also said he gave the statement to BuzzFeed based on information provided by the investigator, and because he was concerned the diver could be the next Jeffrey Epstein. 

Court Filings Made Public

Telsa CEO Elon Musk defended calling a rescue diver “pedo guy,” court documents revealed Monday.

Musk originally made the comment in July 2018, after Vernon Unsworth, a British diver who helped rescue the Thai soccer team trapped in a cave last year, gave an interview to CNN where he had some choice things to say about Musk.

Notably, Unsworth said the submarine Musk had designed to rescue the soccer team would not work and that it was just a PR stunt.

Musk responded by calling Unsworth a “pedo guy” in a now-deleted tweet.

Source: Elon Musk

He also sent an email to BuzzFeed reporter Ryan Mac, in which he accused Unsworth of being a “child rapist” who had taken a “child bride who was about 12 years old at the time.”

Source: BuzzFeed

Musk said he thought the email was off the record, but BuzzFeed said they never agreed to that. In September 2018, Unsworth filed a defamation lawsuit against Musk in the Central District of California.

Court filings from the defamation suit against Musk were made public on Monday.

Musk Defends “Pedo Guy” Tweet

In those documents, Musk claimed that referring to Unsworth as “pedo guy” was not a direct accusation of pedophilia.

“‘Pedo guy’ was a common insult used in South Africa when I was growing up,” Musk wrote. “It is synonymous with ‘creepy old man’ and is used to insult a person’s appearance and demeanor, not accuse a person of acts of pedophilia.”

“I did not intend to accuse Mr. Unsworth of engaging in acts of pedophilia,” he continued. “In response to his insults in the CNN interview, I meant to insult him back by expressing my opinion that he seemed like a creepy old man.”

The fact that Musk is arguing he was expressing his opinion is important in this context because under the First Amendment, opinions are usually protected speech and not considered defamatory.

The documents also included Musk’s deposition, where he talks more in-depth about the “pedo guy” tweet.

In the deposition, Musk said he sent BuzzFeed the email because he was worried it could turn into a Jeffrey Epstein situation, referring to the wealthy financier who was accused of sexually assaulting dozens of young women, including many underage girls. 

“What if we have another Jeffrey Epstein on our hands?” he said. “And what if he uses whatever celebrity he gains from this cave rescue to shield his bad deeds? This would be terrible.”

Musk’s Epstein argument might become problematic. First of all, he made the statements to BuzzFeed before the new allegations surfaced, which some have argued proves he just is using current news to frame Unsworth in a certain way, and that he did not actually consider Epstein at all.

That argument is also furthered by the fact that it has been reported that Musk had attended several events with Epstein, all of which were after Epstein pleaded guilty to soliciting prostitution from an underage girl in 2008.

Musk even said he visited Epstein’s house “several years ago.” Epstein also told The New York Times he had advised Musk while Tesla was trying to go public in 2018, though Musk denies those claims.

Private Investigator

Notably, Musk also said in the filings that he paid a private investigator more than $50,000 to investigate Unsworth after receiving an unsolicited email from the PI in August 2018.

In the documents, Musk says that the investigator: “reported that Mr. Unsworth met and began a relationship with his alleged Thai wife when she around twelve years old.”

He also added that the investigator “reported that Mr. Unsworth associated with Europeans who engage in improper sexual conduct in Thailand,” and that he “learned that Mr. Unsworth frequented Pattaya Beach which is well known for prostitution and sex tourism, and that Mr. Unsworth was unpopular at the rescue site because other rescue workers thought that he was ‘creepy.’”

Musk goes on to say this was the basis for the comments he made in his email to BuzzFeed.

“I did not authorize Mr. Mac or BuzzFeed to publish the contents of the email nor did I intend or expect that they would,” he said. “Especially without first independently verifying and confirming its information.”

He later added that he gave the information to Mac “so that BuzzFeed could conduct its own investigation into Mr. Unsworth and corroborate the information.”

Musk’s lawyers even admitted in the court filings that the private investigator’s findings “lacked solid evidence of Mr. Unsworth’s behavior.” 

Following the release of the court documents, Unsworth’s lawyer gave a statement to BuzzFeed condemning the Musk’s defense.

“The motion filed by Elon Musk today is a disgusting and transparent effort to continue falsely smearing Vernon Unsworth without any credible or verified supporting evidence,” the lawyer said.

“Mr. Unsworth’s opposition to Musk’s motion will reveal the whole truth of Musk’s actions and the falsity of his public statements and his motion with respect to Mr. Unsworth will be exposed.”

See what others are saying: (BuzzFeed News) (The Washington Post) (Business Insider)

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Controversy, Racism, and Genius Kids?! How One Sperm Bank Changed Everything…

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The Repository for Germinal Choice is the most controversial sperm bank in U.S. history. While it was operational some people believed this bank was racist and they even compared the companies goals to Nazi eugenic practices. But even though this sperm bank was highly controversial, it also completely changed the sperm bank industry.

So check out our video for the full story on how this controversial sperm bank would go on to shape an entire industry.

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