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Trump’s Personal Assistant Abruptly Resigns After Reportedly Disclosing Private Information

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  • President Donald Trump’s longtime personal assistant Madeleine Westerhout abruptly stepped down on Thursday.
  • Her resignation follows reports of Trump allegedly learning she disclosed private information about his family and the Oval Office in an off-the-record dinner with reporters.
  • Neither Westerhout or the White House have officially commented on her departure.

Westerhout Resigns

President Donald Trump’s personal assistant, Madeleine Westerhout, abruptly resigned Thursday after the president allegedly learned she had shared details about his family during an off-the-record conversation with journalists.

The 29-year-old, who had worked for Trump since he assumed office, also reportedly shared details of Oval Office operations during that same conversation. Both incidents allegedly occurred earlier this month during a dinner in Berkeley Heights, New Jersey, while Trump visited his Bedminster club as part of a working vacation.

According to CBS News, at the dinner, Westerhout also gossiped about broadcast journalists who were seeking to sit down with the president. 

Though the White House has yet to comment on her departure, the New York Times quoted a source who said Westerhout is now a “separated employee” and is barred from returning to the White House. Westerhout has also not made any public comments regarding her departure. 

As Trump’s personal assistant, her office was situated directly in front of the Oval Office in the West Wing, with many media outlets dubbing her a “gatekeeper” to the president. During a farewell event for Sarah Sanders, the Trump Administration’s former press secretary, sources said Westerhout bragged about her role as a gatekeeper.

At the time of her resignation, she was earning $145,000 annually. 

Westerhout’s History with Trump

Westerhout previously worked on Mitt Romney’s 2012 presidential campaign, having taken off the fall semester of her senior year at the College of Charleston to work as an intern.

She is also a former Republican National Committee assistant to Kate Walsh. Walsh later served on Trump’s transition team and accepted the role of White House Deputy Chief of Staff before resigning after two months.

At first, Westerhout was reportedly not in favor of a Trump administration, with Tim Alberta of Politico writing in his book American Carnage that she was so upset on election night in 2016, she cried. It also states Trump had reservations about Westerhout working as part of his staff. Because of this, some White House officials also feared she would be disloyal to the president. 

“She was a spy from day one who sought to use her proximity to the president to curry favor with his detractors,” a former White House official said of her.

A different former White House official rebuked comments about her intentions, saying she had been singled out by long-term members of Trump’s team for her past with the RNC. The same official also denied reports that she cried on election night.

Yet another former official compared her resignation to a “mob hit,” claiming Alberta’s book stoked questions about her loyalty to the president. 

During Trump’s transition, she gained traction from the media for her role in escorting potential administration officials and even Leonardo DiCaprio through Trump Tower.

“The President-elect wanted to make sure all of his meetings were very transparent, so it became a little bit more public than I originally thought it was going to be,” she told CNN in 2016.

Later in her role, she reportedly enjoyed her access to the president, sharing photos of herself at rallies on her private Instagram account or joking that she printed a piece of paper Trump held up during a speech. Trump, in turn, has often called her “my beauty.”

Politico reported that Westerhout, this year, had been working to expand her job to include aspects like foreign travel. One White House staffer claimed she had been acting like a de facto chief of staff and described her recent dinner with reporters in Bedminster as the “final straw.” 

While writing Fire and Fury, journalist Bob Woodward reached out to interview Trump several times but never received the opportunity. Later, speaking with the president, Trump asked him, “Did you speak to Madeleine?” 

Woodward then indicated he had not, to which Trump said, “Madeleine is the key. She’s the secret.”

Hatch Act Violation

In 2018, Westerhout was found to have violated the Hatch Act, along with deputy press secretary Raj Shah, deputy director of communications Jessica Ditto, and three other White House officials. 

The Hatch Act, written into law in 1939, constitutes that federal employees cannot distribute partisan messages on channels of communication used for official government business. That includes social media accounts. 

The violation came from the Office of the Special Counsel to Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington and found that four of the six staffers — including Westerhout — either tweeted “#MAGA” or “Make America Great Again!” 

The OSC argued that since she and others used the political slogan of Trump in his re-election campaign for 2020, they had violated the act to keep federal employees politically neutral in their jobs.

No action was taken against Westerhout or the five other staffers.

See what others are saying: (BBC) (CNN) (Fox News)

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How Safe Injections Sites in the U.S. Are Fighting Back Against The Opioid Crisis & Do They Work?

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America has been hit with a historical opioid crisis. In 2018, more than 31,000 people died from opioid overdoses, which is more than any previous year recorded in American history. Healthcare professionals and public health experts are offering alternatives to the status quo treatments, which leads us to today’s topic: supervised injection facilities (SIF). 

Also known as overdose prevention sites and medically supervised injection centers, SIF’s have been proposed as a solution to combat America’s opioid problem. In these centers, no drugs are supplied to the users—they bring their own and are given clean syringes to prevent bloodborne diseases. Advocates or these sites are saying that they would stop countless fatal overdoses because there would be medical staff on site. Countries like Switzerland, Canada, and Australia have implemented versions of these facilities and so far there has not been any reported fatal overdoses at a SIF in the world. 

While cities like Seattle, San Francisco, New York City, and Philadelphia have all proposed plans to make sites, they have been met with heavy opposition. The federal government opposed these sites because they claim it breaks federal laws and some residents in these cities are against them due to concerns over attracting more crime. In this video, we’ll be focusing on Philadelphia, as it might become the first U.S. city to legally open a supervised injection facility, along with the court case between the non-profit who is trying to establish the SIF and the federal government.

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Elon Musk Defends Calling Rescue Diver “Pedo Guy” in Lawsuit

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  • In court documents, Elon Musk defended a tweet where he called a diver who helped rescue the Thai soccer team from a cave a “pedo guy” because it “was a common insult used in South Africa.” 
  • The diver sued Musk for defamation last year after Musk sent an email to BuzzFeed where he referred to the diver as “child rapist” who had taken a “child bride who was about 12 years old.” 
  • The court documents from the suit, which were made public Monday, also revealed that Musk paid a private investigator more than $50,000 to look into the diver.
  • Musk also said he gave the statement to BuzzFeed based on information provided by the investigator, and because he was concerned the diver could be the next Jeffrey Epstein. 

Court Filings Made Public

Telsa CEO Elon Musk defended calling a rescue diver “pedo guy,” court documents revealed Monday.

Musk originally made the comment in July 2018, after Vernon Unsworth, a British diver who helped rescue the Thai soccer team trapped in a cave last year, gave an interview to CNN where he had some choice things to say about Musk.

Notably, Unsworth said the submarine Musk had designed to rescue the soccer team would not work and that it was just a PR stunt.

Musk responded by calling Unsworth a “pedo guy” in a now-deleted tweet.

Source: Elon Musk

He also sent an email to BuzzFeed reporter Ryan Mac, in which he accused Unsworth of being a “child rapist” who had taken a “child bride who was about 12 years old at the time.”

Source: BuzzFeed

Musk said he thought the email was off the record, but BuzzFeed said they never agreed to that. In September 2018, Unsworth filed a defamation lawsuit against Musk in the Central District of California.

Court filings from the defamation suit against Musk were made public on Monday.

Musk Defends “Pedo Guy” Tweet

In those documents, Musk claimed that referring to Unsworth as “pedo guy” was not a direct accusation of pedophilia.

“‘Pedo guy’ was a common insult used in South Africa when I was growing up,” Musk wrote. “It is synonymous with ‘creepy old man’ and is used to insult a person’s appearance and demeanor, not accuse a person of acts of pedophilia.”

“I did not intend to accuse Mr. Unsworth of engaging in acts of pedophilia,” he continued. “In response to his insults in the CNN interview, I meant to insult him back by expressing my opinion that he seemed like a creepy old man.”

The fact that Musk is arguing he was expressing his opinion is important in this context because under the First Amendment, opinions are usually protected speech and not considered defamatory.

The documents also included Musk’s deposition, where he talks more in-depth about the “pedo guy” tweet.

In the deposition, Musk said he sent BuzzFeed the email because he was worried it could turn into a Jeffrey Epstein situation, referring to the wealthy financier who was accused of sexually assaulting dozens of young women, including many underage girls. 

“What if we have another Jeffrey Epstein on our hands?” he said. “And what if he uses whatever celebrity he gains from this cave rescue to shield his bad deeds? This would be terrible.”

Musk’s Epstein argument might become problematic. First of all, he made the statements to BuzzFeed before the new allegations surfaced, which some have argued proves he just is using current news to frame Unsworth in a certain way, and that he did not actually consider Epstein at all.

That argument is also furthered by the fact that it has been reported that Musk had attended several events with Epstein, all of which were after Epstein pleaded guilty to soliciting prostitution from an underage girl in 2008.

Musk even said he visited Epstein’s house “several years ago.” Epstein also told The New York Times he had advised Musk while Tesla was trying to go public in 2018, though Musk denies those claims.

Private Investigator

Notably, Musk also said in the filings that he paid a private investigator more than $50,000 to investigate Unsworth after receiving an unsolicited email from the PI in August 2018.

In the documents, Musk says that the investigator: “reported that Mr. Unsworth met and began a relationship with his alleged Thai wife when she around twelve years old.”

He also added that the investigator “reported that Mr. Unsworth associated with Europeans who engage in improper sexual conduct in Thailand,” and that he “learned that Mr. Unsworth frequented Pattaya Beach which is well known for prostitution and sex tourism, and that Mr. Unsworth was unpopular at the rescue site because other rescue workers thought that he was ‘creepy.’”

Musk goes on to say this was the basis for the comments he made in his email to BuzzFeed.

“I did not authorize Mr. Mac or BuzzFeed to publish the contents of the email nor did I intend or expect that they would,” he said. “Especially without first independently verifying and confirming its information.”

He later added that he gave the information to Mac “so that BuzzFeed could conduct its own investigation into Mr. Unsworth and corroborate the information.”

Musk’s lawyers even admitted in the court filings that the private investigator’s findings “lacked solid evidence of Mr. Unsworth’s behavior.” 

Following the release of the court documents, Unsworth’s lawyer gave a statement to BuzzFeed condemning the Musk’s defense.

“The motion filed by Elon Musk today is a disgusting and transparent effort to continue falsely smearing Vernon Unsworth without any credible or verified supporting evidence,” the lawyer said.

“Mr. Unsworth’s opposition to Musk’s motion will reveal the whole truth of Musk’s actions and the falsity of his public statements and his motion with respect to Mr. Unsworth will be exposed.”

See what others are saying: (BuzzFeed News) (The Washington Post) (Business Insider)

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Controversy, Racism, and Genius Kids?! How One Sperm Bank Changed Everything…

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The Repository for Germinal Choice is the most controversial sperm bank in U.S. history. While it was operational some people believed this bank was racist and they even compared the companies goals to Nazi eugenic practices. But even though this sperm bank was highly controversial, it also completely changed the sperm bank industry.

So check out our video for the full story on how this controversial sperm bank would go on to shape an entire industry.

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