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Man Kills 17-Year-Old Bianca Devins and Posts Photos Online

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  • On Sunday 17-year-old Bianca Devins was murdered and her alleged killer posted graphic photos of her body online.
  • He also posted cryptic and incriminating messages to his Instagram story and called police making comments alluding to both the murder and potential self-harm.
  • He is being treated for serious injuries after slitting his neck and has been charged with second-degree murder. 
  • #RIPBianca began trending online, with people sharing condolences and speaking out about this type of violence.

Bianca Devins Killed

After a 17-year-old girl was murdered, graphic photos of her taken by her suspected killer circulated on online forums.

Bianca Devins was a micro-influencer in Utica, New York, who, according to reports, had around 6,000 followers at the time of her death. She was known as an e-girl who posted about video games and other online content. 

In a statement, the Utica Police Department confirmed that she was killed on Sunday morning. According to authorities, she and a 21-year-old man went to a concert together on Saturday night. On the way back, they got into an argument, which continued until they arrived back in Utica early on Sunday. 

The situation ended with the man pulling out a knife and stabbing Devins. 

“During this time it is believed that he took and distributed photographs of the killing on the Discord platform,” the statement reads. “Members of Discord then viewed the images and posts and contacted the Utica Police Department. We can confirm that the images distributed of both the victim and the offender’s injuries are authentic and occurred at the time of the incident.”

According to other reports, the photos were also posted on Instagram and 4chan.

The man then called 911 himself making comments alluding to the murder, as well as comments about harming himself. When officers arrived at the scene, he began stabbing himself in the neck.

An officer also noticed a tarp at the scene, with brown hair sticking out from underneath. 

“The male advised him that the female was beneath the tarp, and proceeded to pull out a cell phone,” the statement continues. “It was at this time that is believed that the male took self-photographs of himself laying across the deceased female.”

Officers were able to disarm the man, who was taken to the hospital with severe injuries but is expected to survive. He has been charged with second-degree murder. 

The police investigation is ongoing and officers are still trying to figure out the nature of Devins’ relationship with the suspected killer. According to their statement, they met online two months ago. However, some reports have identified him as her boyfriend, some say he was a man who was obsessed with her, and others call him a family friend. 

Devins’ family released a statement about the tragic news saying she “was a talented artist, a loving sister, daughter, and cousin, and a wonderful young girl, taken from us all too soon.”

“We are very grateful for the outpouring of love and sympathy we have received from our Friends, Family, Bianca’s Friends and the whole community,” the statement added. “Your prayers help to strengthen us through this difficult time.”

Photos Circulate Online

The story blew up on social media, with many focusing on the photos shared of the killing, as well as other social posts from the alleged murderer. 

The photo of Devins that was posted to Discord was reportedly captioned with, “sorry fuckers, you’re going to have to find somebody else to orbit.” Orbiting is a phrase that refers to a “non-alpha male” who idolizes and pedestalizes a woman in hopes of pursuing her. 

BuzzFeed News obtained screenshots of very cryptic messages he allegedly posted to his Instagram story that night. One included a quote from the movie Fight Club that says, “this is your life and it’s ending one minute at a time.” 

Screenshot via BuzzFeed.

Another photo posted to his Instagram story said, “Here comes hell. It’s redemption, right?”

Screenshot via BuzzFeed.

BuzzFeed News and the Washington Post obtained screenshots that allegedly came from his Discord and show him saying “subscribe to Pewdiepie.”

Screenshot via BuzzFeed.

BuzzFeed News also obtained screenshots of his Instagram bio before his account was taken down. It was updated to include a lifespan that read “10/06/1997-7/14/19,” which notably marked Sunday as his date of death. It also said, “just know that I feel no pain now.” 

Instagram gave a statement to Rolling Stone saying they removed his account.

“We have also taken steps to prevent others from re-uploading the content posted to that account to Instagram,” they added.

Discord also gave Rolling Stone a statement about the news. 

“We are shocked and deeply saddened by this terrible situation,” their spokesperson said. “We are working closely with law enforcement to provide any assistance we can. In the meantime, our hearts go out to Bianca’s family and loved ones.”

#RIPBianca Trends Online

The story also created the hashtag #RIPBianca, which began trending on Twitter. People are using it to share their condolences and to speak out against violence of this nature. 

Many are also commenting messages on Devins’ Instagram, which has gained over 100,000 followers, sharing messages of love and saying “Rest in Peace.”

However, the comment section has also brought out an ugly side of the Internet. Some users are commenting that they have the graphic photos available on their profile.

Others are fighting back against users victim-blaming Devins, claiming she “literally had it coming” for meeting men online and allegedly leading them on.

“What happened to bianca is absolutely sickening and the way the internet is responding is almost just as sick,” one comment reads.  

“She didn’t deserve it or have it coming. she was a child,” said another.

Editors Note: At Rogue Rocket, we make it a point to not include the names and pictures of mass murders or suspected mass murderers who may have been seeking attention or infamy. Therefore, we will not be linking to other sources, as they may contain these details.

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James Charles, Tana Mongeau, and Erika Costell Apologize for Attending Parties During Pandemic

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  • Youtube and TikTok personalities have recently come under fire for attending parties during the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.
  • After much backlash online for attending a party last week, YouTuber James Charles issued a text apology within a new video, calling it a “selfish and stupid decision.”
  • Viral footage from Tana Mongeau’s social media showed her and Erika Costell at another party Saturday, saying “We don’t care!” which many interpreted as their stance on the pandemic.
  • Both later issued text apologies for attending parties and clarified that the comment was in reference to suspected drama between them.

Influencers Just Want to Party

Influencers James Charles, Tana Mongeau, and Erika Costell have issued apologies for attending parties during the coronavirus pandemic after widespread backlash.

On July 21, an estimated 70 people gathered at a Hollywood Hills home to celebrate Hype House member Larray Merritt’s birthday. Influencers in attendance included James Charles, Tana Mongeau, Nikita Dragun, and the D’Amelio sisters.

The guests were widely criticized for ignoring social distancing recommendations and not wearing face masks after fans and fellow creators saw photos and videos of the party online. Despite online backlash, most creators were silent about being involved with the party, only Larray issued a quick apology.

James Charles Apology

Photos of the event showed James Charles ignoring social distancing guidelines and not wearing a mask. Most of these images have since expired from his Instagram story, but on Twitter, he still has a photo up with the caption, “uhh, I think this is the best paparazzi photo I’ve ever taken oh my god.”

It wasn’t until Saturday, after delaying a video he was supposed to have released on Friday, that he finally broke his silence on the matter.

Saturday’s video is titled A Day in the Life of James Charles,” and shows what the title suggests. Around 17 minutes in, there’s footage of James in an Uber, wearing a mask on his way to the party. The video also shows him at the party wearing a mask, albeit ignoring social distancing.

Then the video cuts to the following message, “Hi sisters! I decided to cut the party footage from the video. Even though I have been wearing a mask in public and have tested negative multiple times, going to a party during a pandemic was a selfish & stupid decisions. People’s safety and keeping COVID-19 contained is FAR more important than celebrating a friend’s birthday and unsafe partying is not something I want to promote to my audience.”

“I recognize that with my platform comes responsibility,” he continued, adding, “and I encourage you guys to be smarter than I was – Wear your masks and continue to social distance. Love you.”

The message stays on screen for 12 seconds before showing footage of James speaking with paparazzi while standing outside of the party.

His apology for attending the party was met with severe backlash online.

“James Charles apology is bs. He knew what he was doing when he went and he knew he shouldn’t go but he didn’t care. He’s only apologizing because he got in trouble and the same with everyone else apologizing,” wrote one user.

However, there were people who defended the YouTuber, saying, “Y’all just an excuse to hate, nothing ever pleases you all, he could’ve made a 1 hr long apology and y’all still would have been shitting on him, he messed up…”

One Party Is Bad Enough…

While James faced critiques over attending Larray’s party, Tana has received particular backlash for attending at least three parties during the pandemic: one at Jake Paul’s home, Larray’s birthday bash, and another party on Saturday.

Outrage against her grew after an Instagram story she posted with Erika Costell Satursady made it seem like the two were making light the pandemic. In the now-expired Instagram live story, the two can be heard saying, “Listen, we don’t fucking care.”

The video quickly caused outrage, and users wrote things like, “Nobody is surprised at the fact that tana mongoose is out there partying everyday day and instead of posting an apology shes out there saying “we dont fucking care” during a whole ass pandemic.”

Although, it’s worth noting that many pointed out that both women were involved with Jake Paul, leading to theories that the post was actually about that.

The confusion was clarified on Sunday night, when Costell tweeted out, “Hey guys – I just want to apologize for the video that was posted last night on Tanas Instagram story. The comment we made as NOT intended as it was perceived. Saying “we don’t care” was about our previous “beef”. It was in no way related to the COVID-19 pandemic we are in.”

She went on to add that she understands why people were offended, calling her attendance “careless and stupid.”

“I am truly sorry to anyone I let down or upset in any way & I fully take accountability for my actions,” she added.

A few hours later, Tana followed up with her own apology on her Instagram story.

“Partying/going to any social gatherings during a global pandemic was such a careless and irresponsible action on my behalf. I fully hold myself accountable for this + will be staying inside,” she wrote.

Actions like that don’t deserve a platform and I want to fully apologize and be better than this. I’m sorry. While Erika and I were referring to past drama in our video the topic no longer matters – I need to be a example and person.”

Tana Mongeau apologizes for party with Erika Costell
Tana’s apology as seen on her Instagram Story, July 27, 2020.

While many appreciated that an apology and explanation was finally given, not everyone was buying it. Many pointed out that Tana is constantly giving apologies over the various controversies that she seems to find herself in. YouTuber Elijah Daniel directly called out Tana and Erika for partying, and later added that he was fed up with influencers constantly apologizing and not actually changing.

“hi influencers caught partying, this video is for you. spread this to your fans on ALL of your platforms (since you don’t mind spreading things!), then self quarantine for 14 days and come back and we will consider even reading your apologies.”

See What Others Are Saying: (Dexerto) (Vulture) (Newsweek)

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US Army Suspends Twitch Streaming Amid Recruitment Concerns and Free Speech Controversies

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  • The U.S. Army has faced substantial blowback for banning Twitch users asking about war crimes on its eSports channel, a move that potentially violates free speech laws.
  • The criticism has been so intense that the Army has now paused streaming on its Twitch channel, which it uses as a recruitment method. 
  • Also on Wednesday, Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) filed a measure that aims to completely block the military from using Twitch to recruit. 
  • Separately, the Army has come under fire for seemingly hosting a fake giveaway that linked to a recruitment page. Twitch ultimately forced it to remove that giveaway, but the Army maintains that it was a legitimate giveaway.

Army Suspends Twitch Streaming

The United States Army has hit pause on the Twitch channel for its eSports team as of Wednesday, following mounting concerns that it has repeatedly violated First Amendment free speech laws by banning viewers who ask about everything from U.S. war crimes to Eddie Gallagher.

The news of the Army’s banning practice gained traction on July 8 when activist Jordan Uhl posted a clip of him asking about war crimes during a stream on the channel. Notably, the channel is used as a way for the Army to promote recruitment and talk with viewers about life in the military.

“What’s your favorite U.S. w4r cr1me?” Uhl asked after learning that “war crime” was already a banned phrase on the channel. 

Uhl also posted a link in the chatbox to the Wikipedia page for U.S. war crimes. He was then banned. 

“Have a nice time getting banned, my dude,” said Army recruiter and gamer Joshua “Strotnium” David.

On Saturday, Uhl was again banned for asking similar questions, this time on the Twitch channel for the Navy’s eSports team. Reportedly, others asking similar questions were also banned during that stream.

On Wednesday, the Knight First Amendment Institute then demanded that the Army and Navy change their banning practices. It also asked the Army to restore access for not only Uhl but also for 300 others who have been banned for similar comments. 

“When the government intentionally opens a space to the public at large for expressive activity, it has created a ‘public forum’ under the First Amendment, and it cannot constitutionally bar speakers from that forum based on viewpoint,” the Institute said in a letter to the two branches.

Later that same day, the Army announced it would suspend streaming on Twitch to “review internal policies and procedures, as well as all platform-specific policies.”

Still, a spokesperson for the Army has maintained that the branch did not violate free speech laws, arguing that people like Uhl were banned because the term war crimesis “meant to troll and harass the team.” 

AOC Files Measure to the Block Military from Twitch

Also on Wednesday, Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) announced plans to file an amendment that would block the military from using video games and esports as recruitment methods. 

“It’s incredibly irresponsible for the Army and the Navy to be recruiting impressionable young people and children via live streaming platforms,” Ocasio-Cortez said.

“War is not a game,” she added while pointing to the Marine Corps, which is the only branch of the U.S. military that has refused to form an esports team.

For its part, the Marines have said it does not want to “gamify” combat since it is a military agency that deals in combat. 

“The Marine Corps’ decision not to engage in this recruiting tool should be a clear signal to the other branches of the military to cease this practice entirely,” Ocasio-Cortez said. 

Is the Army Violating the First Amendment on Twitch?

Uhl has maintained that he wasn’t simply trying to troll the Army eSports Team; rather, he said the reason he asked questions about war crimes was because he had heard rumors of people receiving bans by the Army and Navy for broaching such topics on their Twitch channels. 

“Was I undiplomatic? Sure,” Uhl said in an article posted on The Nation. “But if the military is going to use one of the world’s most popular platforms to recruit kids, then it shouldn’t be able to do so without some pushback. Right now, with the support of Twitch, gamers with the US military are spending hours with children as young as 13, trying to convince them to enlist.”

“While members of military e-sports teams offer the regular gaming skill set, they’re also on-screen talent and recruiters,” Uhl said. “Instead of approaching a recruiter behind a table in a school cafeteria, kids can hang out with one who is playing their favorite video games and replying to their chat messages for hours on end.”

While a normal Twitch streamer can generally moderate their channel however they want, public forums hosted by the government must abide by free speech laws. In fact, there’s even legal precedent to support this. 

For example, in June 2019, a federal appeals court ruled that President Trump can’t block critics from his Twitter account because it constitutes a public forum.

Despite that, in a statement, the Army originally argued that it banned Uhl because he had violated Twitch’s harassment policies.

“Team members are very clear when talking with potential applicants that a game does not reflect a real Army experience,” a spokesperson said following the July 8 incident. “They discuss their career experiences in real terms with factual events.”

“Team members ensure people understand what the Army offers through a realistic lens and not through the lens of a game meant for entertainment,” the spokesperson added. “This user’s question was an attempt to shift the conversation to imply that Soldiers commit war crimes based on an optional weapon in a game, and we felt that violated Twitch’s harassment policy.”

That spokesperson also went on to defend the Army by noting that it offers multiple career paths and that “the goal of the Army eSports Team is to accurately portray that range of opportunities to interested youth.”

Despite that, the statement quickly drew the ire of the American Civil Liberties Union, which responded on Twitter by saying, “Calling out the government’s war crimes isn’t harassment, it’s speaking truth to power. And banning users who ask important questions isn’t ‘flexing,’ it’s unconstitutional.” 

US Army Caught Seemingly Offering Fake Giveaways

In addition to free speech concerns, the Army has also found itself defending its recruitment practices on the platform.

Last week, Uhl accused the branch of “repeatedly” presenting viewers “with an automated chat prompt that says they could win a Xbox Elite Series 2 controller… and a link where they can enter the ‘giveaway.’” 

However, upon clicking that link, Uhl said he was redirected to a recruiting form with no additional information on the “contest, odds, total number of winners, or when a drawing will occur.”

The news prompted outrage among streamers and game developers who urged Twitch to take action against the Army’s esports channel. 

On Thursday, Twitch finally responded, telling Kotaku that it had forced the Army to stop advertising that giveaway, saying, “This promotion did not comply with our Terms, and we have required them to remove it.” 

Since then, an Army representative has said that, despite transparency issues, a legitimate giveaway system had been in place. 

“Each giveaway has its own URL and marketing activity code that directly connect the registrant to the specific giveaway,” the rep said. “An eligible winner is selected at random, and the prize is given out. Twitch asked our team to remove the giveaway for lack of transparency, and they did. The team is exploring options to use platforms for giveaways that will provide more external clarity.”

See what others are saying: (The New York Times) (Kotaku) (Vice)

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Twitch Forces US Army to Stop Sharing Fake Giveaways That Link to Recruitment Page

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  • Twitch has ordered the U.S. Army to stop offering fake giveaways on its platform.
  • The issue first came to light after a reporter noticed that a prize giveaway link, which was posted into the chat box of an Army esports stream, redirected users to a recruitment page. 
  • According to that reporter, the recruitment page offered “no additional mention of a contest, odds, total number of winners, or when a drawing will occur.”
  • Separately, the U.S. Army has also faced substantial blowback for banning Twitch users asking about war crimes, a move that potentially violates free speech laws.

US Army Offers Fake Giveaways

After the United States Army was allegedly caught promising fake prize giveaways on Twitch to promote its recruitment page, Twitch has ordered it to abandon the strategy.

The practice was first detailed by reporter Jordan Uhl in The Nation on Wednesday and stems from the Army’s esports team, which regularly streams on Twitch as a way to talk to teens about life in the military and recruitment options. Both the Navy and the Air Force also have esports teams that stream on Twitch.

In the chat box of those streams, the Army would reportedly post automated links promoting prize giveaways. For example, one prize included an Xbox Elite Series 2 controller; however, once people clicked the link to try to win that controller, they weren’t taken to a page to enter that drawing. 

Instead, according to The Nation, they were directed to “a recruiting form with no additional mention of a contest, odds, total number of winners, or when a drawing will occur.”

The news prompted outrage among some streamers and game developers who then urged Twitch to take action against the U.S. Army esports channel.

“The silence from @Twitch on the latest wave of criticism regarding the military using the site to scam kids into sharing personal info speaks volumes,” streamer Jayson “MANvsGame” Love said on Twitter. “Imagine ANY other channel doing that. Feel free to manipulate your viewers as much as you like, I guess?”

On Thursday, gaming website Kotaku reported that Twitch had forced the Army to stop tricking viewers, with Twitch saying in a statement to the outlet, “Per our Terms of Service, promotions on Twitch must comply with all applicable laws. This promotion did not comply with our Terms, and we have required them to remove it.”

Meanwhile, the Army has remained silent on why it allegedly engaged in fake giveaway tactics. 

Is the US Army Also Violating Free Speech Laws on Twitch?

The fake giveaway is not the only Twitch-related controversy the Army has recently faced. Last week, after catching wind of users being banned for asking uncomfortable questions, Uhl reported that the Army’s Twitch channel banned him after he asked about war crimes during a stream—a move that could be seen as a blockage of free speech.

In a recorded video, Uhl asks other viewers what their favorite U.S. war crime is in the chat box of that stream. He then links to the Wikipedia page for U.S. war crimes. Seconds after that, he is banned.

“Have a nice time getting banned, my dude,” Army recruiter and gamer Joshua “Strotnium” David tells Uhl just before the video ends. 

The U.S. Army (and its esports team) are not private entities. While general Twitch streamers can moderate their channels however they wish, public forums hosted by the government are generally required to abide by strict free speech laws.

In response, the Army later confirmed that it banned Uhl directly because of his comments, arguing that those comments violated Twitch’s harassment policies.

“Team members are very clear when talking with potential applicants that a game does not reflect a real Army experience,” a representative of the U.S. Army esports team told Vice. “They discuss their career experiences in real terms with factual events.”

“Team members ensure people understand what the Army offers through a realistic lens and not through the lens of a game meant for entertainment. This user’s question was an attempt to shift the conversation to imply that Soldiers commit war crimes based on an optional weapon in a game, and we felt that violated Twitch’s harassment policy.”

“The U.S. Army offers youth more than 150 different careers, and ultimately the goal of the Army eSports Team is to accurately portray that range of opportunities to interested youth.”

The American Civil Liberties Union, however, has argued that “calling out the government’s war crimes isn’t harassment, it’s speaking truth to power. And banning users who ask important questions isn’t ‘flexing,’ it’s unconstitutional.”

Concerns Over Army Streaming With Teens

“Was I undiplomatic?,” Uhl asked in his Wednesday article. “Sure. But if the military is going to use one of the world’s most popular platforms to recruit kids, then it shouldn’t be able to do so without some pushback. Right now, with the support of Twitch, gamers with the US military are spending hours with children as young as 13, trying to convince them to enlist.”

As Uhl noted, the military’s newfound use of Twitch could be an even more effective method than “approaching a recruiter behind a table in a school cafeteria.” For example, “kids can hang out with one who is playing their favorite video games and replying to their chat messages for hours on end.”

Of the four main branches of the military, only the Marine Corps has refused to launch an esports team. 

“This is due in part to the belief that the brand and issues associated with combat are too serious to be ‘gamified’ in a responsible manner,” the Marine Corps Recruiting Command said in January. 

See what others are saying: (The Nation) (Kotaku) (The Verge)

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