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Opposition-Linked Doctor’s Union Reports 108 Dead in Sudan After Attack on Protestors

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  • A new report from the Central Committee of Sudanese Doctors (CCSD) said that 108 people were killed and more than 500 were injured during a paramilitary attack on Sudanese protestors on June 3.
  • The Sudanese government contradicted the CCSD report on Thursday when a Health Ministry official told Reuters that the death toll was at 61.
  • International leaders have condemned the paramilitary forces that attacked the protestors.
  • They have also expressed concern about stalled negotiations and clashes between the Sudanese military and protest leaders, who have been battling over who will lead the country’s transitionary government.

Central Committee of Sudanese Doctors Report

The Central Committee of Sudanese Doctors (CCSD), an opposition-linked doctors’ union, reported that 108 people were killed and more than 500 others were injured in a violent attack on Sudanese protestors in Khartoum on Monday.

Earlier this week, paramilitary security forces attacked a weeks-long demonstration staged by Sudanese protestors who have been camped outside the military’s headquarters since early April.

The security forces entered the camp, opening fire at civilians and torching their tents. It was also reported the security forces used live ammunition inside a hospital where wounded protestors were being treated.

After several hours, the paramilitary forces were successful in gaining control over most of the camp, having effectively dispersed the protestors and sealing off nearly a square mile area that the sit-in had previously occupied.

Since the attack, the reported death toll has been steadily rising. The CCSD first posted the recent information on their Facebook page late on Wednesday, and then provided more information in an updated post on Thursday.

Central Committee of Sudan Doctors via Facebook

However, there is a discrepancy between the doctor’s field report and the numbers given by the government. On Thursday, the director general of Sudan’s Health Ministry, Suleiman Abdel Jabbar, told Reuters that the death toll was at 61 people.

Ongoing Conflict

While Monday’s attack was especially violent and lethal, Sundanese demonstrators have been clashing with security forces since anti-government protests first broke out in December.

Ever since a military coup overthrew the long-time Sudanese president Omar al-Bashir on April 11, civilians and the military have been grappling for control of power.

Following the coup, the military installed the Transitional Military Council (TMC) to oversee a transition of power that they said will last at most two years.

However, demonstrators have demanded that the military ruler hand over power to a civilian-led government immediately.

Military leaders agreed to negotiate with protest leaders to form a transitional government, but the military and the opposition protesters have not been able to agree on the role of the military in that transition.

Over the last month or so, Sudan’s political climate has been defined by on-and-off negotiations as well as continued protests and demonstrations, some of which have reportedly been met with violence from security forces.

Response

Following the attacks, numerous foreign leaders and government officials responded by condemning the violence.

U.S. National Security Advisor John Bolton referred to the attack as “abhorrent” in a tweet.

That was also echoed in a statement from a U.S. State Department Spokesperson that said: “The United States condemns the recent attacks on protesters in Sudan.”

U.K. Foreign Minister Jeremy Hunt condemned the incident in a tweet and said that the security forces’ actions would “only lead to more polarisation and violence.”

The following day the U.S., Norway, and the U.K. issued a joint statement condemning the security forces for attacking civilians, and calling for “an agreed transfer of power to a civilian-led government as demanded by the people of Sudan.”

The African Union, Egypt, Germany, and Qatar also issued separate statements calling for protest leaders and the TMC to return to negotiations, and the European Union called for a peaceful transition to a civilian government, according to Al Jazeera.  

A number of international organizations responded to the attack too, like Human Rights Watch, which referred to the attack in a statement as “egregious rights violations” that “require urgent international action to halt further violations.” The group also called for the U.N. to launch an official investigation.

On that note, the U.N. Secretary General’s office released a statement following the attack. “The Secretary-General strongly condemns the violence and reports of the excessive use of force by security personnel on civilians, that have resulted in the deaths and injury of many,” the statement said.

However, on Tuesday, China and Russia blocked an effort by the U.N. Security Council to formally condemn the killing of civilians and call on world powers to stop the violence.

Additionally, on Thursday, the U.N. announced that it will be pulling all its personnel from Sudan, Al Jazeera reported.

The African Union also issued a more formal response on Thursday, announcing in a tweet. that they will suspend Sudan’s membership from the union.

With everything that has happened this week, it’s unclear how Sudan will proceed. Following the attack, the TMC said they would no longer negotiate with the protestors and called for snap elections in nine months.

Then on Wednesday, military leaders went back on that decision and said they wanted negotiations, but were rebuked by the protest leaders, who refuse to negotiate with them after the attack.

Meanwhile, demonstrators are still protesting and the military has said they will investigate the attack.

See what others are saying: (Al Jazeera) (The Washington Post) (BBC)

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Thousands Paralyze France in Pension Reform Protests

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  • Massive worker strikes and protests have shut down schools, transportation services, and museums in France.
  • Though largely peaceful, there have been reports of protesters throwing projectiles at police, smashing windows, and setting fires.
  • The strike, which is expected to last into the weekend, is in protest of planned pension reforms proposed by President Emmanuel Macron. 
  • Under Macron’s policy, many workers fear they would need to work longer before accessing a pension that would ultimately give them less money.

Strikes Shut Down Trains, Flights, and Schools

Hundreds of thousands of French workers went on strike across the country on Thursday in protest of a proposed new pension reform system.

Under the new system, many unions worry people will need to work longer to see less money than they would under the current system. 

As of midday, French officials are reporting that more than 280,000 people have joined protests across the country; however, that figure doesn’t include counts from major cities like Paris and Lyon.

The protests, which are expected to continue Friday and likely to extend into the weekend, have shut down train lines and canceled flights.  

According to reports, 90% of high-speed and inter-city trains have been canceled. In Paris, only five of 16 of the city’s metro lines ran Thursday. Further, the international train company Eurostar said it will be operating with a reduced timetable until Tuesday.

Air France has also canceled 30% of domestic flights and 10% of short-haul international flights, that coming amid mass walkouts by air traffic controllers.

If all of that wasn’t enough to cripple transportation, one group is reportedly drawing over the QR codes on e-scooters like Bird so that people can’t use them. 

Additionally, according to the education ministry, half of primary school teachers and 42% of secondary school teachers are on strike today. The end result led to some school closing for the day. 

Tourist sites like the Eiffel Tower and museums were also closed, but more notably, many feared hospital staffing shortages as many medical workers walked out to demonstrate. 

For their part, several trade union leaders have promised to continue to strike until Macron abandons his planned pension overhaul.

Reports of Violence

In Paris alone, 6,000 police have been deployed. Reports indicate that 71 people have been arrested in Paris by 3:30 p.m. local time.

With those arrests, there have also been several reports of clashing between police and protesters, with protesters hurling projectiles at police. Police in several cities have since responded with tear gas. 

Videos of protesters setting fires to object in the streets have also surfaced. 

Because the protest in Paris is so huge, the city’s police chief told all businesses and restaurants along the major march routes to close. Later within the day, new reports surfaced that some protesters had smashed in the windows of some businesses.

French President Emmanuel Macron, however, was described by one senior official as “calm and determined” in the face of the strikes —

Macron is “watchful that public order be respected, watchful as to the difficulties for French people, and watchful also that the right to strike is respected,” the aide said.

Why is France Considering Pension Reform?

Currently, France has 42 different pension systems across both the private and public sectors. That means that people retire at different times and will see different benefits. 

Under different forms of the system, for example, aircrews and rail workers get to retire earlier, but people like lawyers and doctors pay a lower tax.

The official age of retirement in France is 62, which is one of the earliest retirement ages in wealthy countries, but that hurdle has already been raised from 60 within the last decade. 

Macron, who campaigned on the promise of pension reform, now says he wants to introduce a universal, points-based pension system. While Macron says such a pension system would help the country compete globally in the 21st century, such a system would mean that some of the most advantageous pension plans would be scrapped. 

Secondly, if a person were to retire before 64, they would end up seeing a lower pension. For example, if they retire at 63, they would see about 5% less.

French people, however, have generally supported pension reform, with one poll showing 75% of people saying they believed pension reform was necessary. Of those polled, only one-third of people said they thought the government could pull off reform.

See what others are saying: (The Wall Street Journal) (The New York Times) (NPR)

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House Passes Bill to Sanction China for Treatment of Uighurs

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  • The House passed a bill condemning the Chinese treatment of Uighurs and recommending sanctions on top Chinese officials.
  • The Senate passed a version of the bill in September. The two chambers must now come up with a unified version to pass on to President Trump.
  • China responded by condemning the legislation, and saying it “grossly interferes in China’s internal affairs.”
  • The move comes as the U.S. is already in hot water with China following Trump’s decision to sign an act last week authorizing the U.S. to impose sanctions on Hong Kong for human rights abuses, among other things.

House Passes Uighur Bill

The House of Representatives passed a bill on Tuesday that would place sanctions on top Chinese officials involved in perpetrating human rights abuses against China’s Muslim Uighur minority, as well as formally condemn the country’s treatment of the Uighurs.

The bill, which was passed with an overwhelming vote of 407-1, also details the efforts of the Chinese government in recent years to ramp up control of the Xinjiang region where the Uighurs reside.

In addition to implementing advanced AI surveillance systems all over the region, the Chinese government has also detained upwards of one million Uighurs in internment camps.

Numerous reports, as well as both public and leaked Chinese government documents, show that the Uighurs are detained against their will in the camps, where they are forced to learn Mandarin, swear loyalty to President Xi Jinping, and renounce their faith.

There have also been multiple reports of torture and other human rights abuses, prompting rights groups and countries all over the world to argue that the camps are systems of mass-incarceration for an ethnic minority and a violation of human rights.

China, which originally denied the existence of the camps, now claims that they are vocational boarding schools where they help the Uighurs by giving them job training and education skills. They also claim that it is a safe way to combat terrorism.

Contents of House Bill 

The House bill comes a few months after the Senate passed a similar version of the legislation back in September.

According to the text of the bill, the purpose of the Act is to “direct United States resources to address gross violations of universally recognized human rights, including the mass internment of over 1,000,000 Uighurs” and other Muslim minorities in the region.

The Act also accuses the Chinese government having policies that have “systematically discriminated” against the Uighurs, including:

  • “Pervasive, high-tech surveillance across the region, including the arbitrary collection of biodata, such as DNA samples from children, without their knowledge or consent.”
  • “The use of QR codes outside homes to gather information on how frequently individuals pray.”
  • “Facial and voice recognition software and ‘predictive policing’ databases.”
  • And “severe restrictions on the freedom of movement across the region.”

The bill also accuses China of using the threat of terrorism as a justification for “pervasive restrictions on, and gross human rights violations against, the ethnic minority communities.”

If implemented, the legislation would direct the president to “condemn abuses against” the Uighurs and call on President Xi to “recognize the profound abuse and likely lasting damage” of China’s policies, “immediately close” the camps, and “lift all restrictions on and ensure respect for internationally guaranteed human rights across the region.”

Perhaps most significantly, the bill would also “impose targeted sanctions” on members of the Chinese government and other officials who have been involved in these abuses.

This would include officials who have been “credibly alleged to be responsible for human rights abuses in Xinjiang and elsewhere.”

Among other things, the Act would also direct the Secretary of Commerce to consider prohibiting the sale of U.S. products and services to state agents in Xinjiang.

China Responds

China condemned the House’s actions in a statement issued by the Chinese Foreign Ministry.

“This bill deliberately smears the human rights condition in Xinjiang, slanders China’s efforts in de-radicalization and counter-terrorism and viciously attacks the Chinese government’s Xinjiang policy,” the statement said.

“It seriously violates international law and basic norms governing international relations, and grossly interferes in China’s internal affairs.”

The statement went on to say that the situation is not about human rights, but “fighting violence, terrorism and separatism.” The ministry also claimed that “the international community speaks highly” of its policies in Xinjiang. 

“We urge the US to correct its mistakes at once, prevent this bill from becoming law, and stop using Xinjiang-related issues to interfere China’s internal affairs,” the statement concluded. “China will take further reactions according to how the situation develops.”

Congress and U.S.-China Relations

Now, the House and Senate will have to work together to decide on a final version before passing it off to President Donald Trump, who has not said if he will sign the bill.

Despite the legislation’s bipartisan nature, whether or not Trump will sign it up in the air.

The president is already in hot water with China after signing an Act last week, which, among other things, authorizes the U.S. to impose sanctions on Hong Kong for human rights abuses.

Trump had initially been hesitant to sign the Act because he was worried it would complicate trade talks with China, but he ultimately went forward with it after pressure from Republican leaders.

China responded by imposing sanctions on several U.S.-based nongovernmental organizations.

With the Uighur bill almost certain to further disrupt trade negotiations, it remains unclear if Trump will risk sacrificing a possible deal to approve the legislation. 

Trump may find himself stuck in double-bind if Congressional leaders again pressure him to sign this bill, and especially if Congress has a veto-proof majority, as was the case with the Hong Kong legislation. 

As divided as Congress is right now, they have recently worked together to push through a number of bills targeting China with huge bipartisan support in both chambers.

See what others are saying: (The Washington Post) (BBC) (Al Jazeera)

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Trump Calls Trudeau “Two-Faced” After Hot Mic Video Surfaces

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  • A video featuring multiple world leaders appearing to make fun of Donald Trump was recorded at a NATO summit reception on Tuesday.
  • The clip, which has now gone viral, features Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, among other prominent figures, chatting in a circle at Buckingham Palace.
  • Trump responded to the video by calling Trudeau “two-faced” and accusing the Prime Minister of being upset that Trump was pushing him to up Canada’s military spending.
  • Trudeau later admitted he was talking about Trump while the others in the video have either flatly denied it or declined to comment.

Viral Video

A video of several world leaders appearing to bash U.S. President Donald Trump at a NATO summit reception went viral on Tuesday.

The 25-second clip shows Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, French President Emmanuel Macron, and Prime Minister Mark Rutte of the Netherlands huddled together, chatting. 

There is a fifth in the circle whose face is never fully seen, but many believe that it is British royal Princess Anne, Queen Elizabeth II’s daughter.

In the video, first shared online by the Canadian Broadcasting Corp, only snippets of the conversation were picked up.

“Is that why you were late?” Johnson asks Macron in the clip, smiling at him.

“He was late because he takes a forty-minute press conference off the top,” Trudeau says, fiddling his drink.

Trump is never mentioned by name in the video, but many viewers speculate that the group seems to be referencing the U.S. President’s actions earlier that day.

“You just watched his team’s jaws drop to the floor,” Trudeau adds later in the video, after more inaudible discussion.

Rutte stands by, listening. Macron chimes into the conversation, but his words are inaudible in the recording.

The video was released just hours after a tense meeting between Trump and Macron, in which the French President pressed the American leader about his involvement with the military conflict in Turkey.

Trump’s Response

When asked about the video by reporters on Wednesday, prior to his meeting with German Chancellor Angela Merkel, Trump responded with an insult—and then a compliment-—aimed at Trudeau. 

“Well he’s two-faced,” Trump said of the Canadian Prime Minister. “And honestly, with Trudeau, he’s a nice guy, I find him to be a very nice guy.” 

Trump went on to blame Trudeau’s frustration on the dispute over how much Canada is doling out on military spending. All NATO members are required to spend at least 2% of their GDP on national defense, a number that Canada is not currently meeting. 

“I called him out on the fact that he’s not paying two percent, and I guess he’s not very happy about it,” Trump said.

“Look, I’m representing the U.S. and he should be paying more than he’s paying and he understands that,” Trump added. “So I can imagine he’s not that happy, but that’s the way it is.”

Trudeau Admits to Talking About Trump

While Trudeau initially ignored reporters’ questions about the video on Wednesday, he later publicly admitted that it was indeed Trump that he was referring to in his comments about a 40-minute press conference.

“Last night I made reference to the fact that there was an unscheduled press conference before my meeting with President Trump,” Trudeau said. “I was happy to be part of it but it was certainly notable.” 

Trudeau confessed this in a press conference on Wednesday evening, according to CNN. He also addressed his “jaw drop” remarks, saying that they were referencing Trump’s announcement that the upcoming G7 summit will be hosted at Camp David.

“Every different leader has teams who now and then [had] jaws drop at unscheduled surprises, like that video for itself, for example,” Trudeau said.

Other Leaders Distancing Themselves From Video 

Although Trudeau came clean, the others featured in the video did not want to be associated with the recorded criticism of President Trump. Johnson flatly denied that he was apart of any such conversation.

“That’s complete nonsense, and I don’t know where that has come from,” he said at a news conference on Wednesday afternoon. “I really don’t know what is being referred to there.”

A spokesperson for Macron told CNN that they had “no comment,” and that the recorded conversation “does not say anything special,” while a spokesperson for Rutte told them they do not comment on closed-door sessions. 

See what others are saying: (New York Times) (CNN) (Washington Post)

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