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German Nurse Who Killed at Least 85 Patients Gets Life in Prison

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  • A German nurse who was nicknamed “Resuscitation Rambo” by his coworkers has now been handed a second life sentence for murdering 85 of his patients.
  • Niels Högel was accused of administering non-prescribed drugs to patients to send them into cardiac arrests in an attempt to show off his resuscitation skills.
  • Police say that he may have killed as many as 200, while one spokesperson for a group of the victims’ relatives puts the number as high as 300.

Resuscitation Rambo

A German nurse was handed a second life sentence on Thursday for the murder of 85 patients who were once under his care.

The former nurse, Niels Högel is now considered Germany’s deadliest post-war serial killer. The 42-year-old was employed at two clinics, one in Delmenhorst and another in Oldenburg. Prosecutors say that between 2000 and 2005, he had killed at least 100 patients between the ages of 34 and 96.

During his trial, Högel confessed to killing 43 patients, denied killing five, and said he could not remember details about the 52 others. He was later acquitted of 15 deaths due to lack of evidence.

Högel was accused of giving victims various non-prescribed drugs to orchestrate cardiac arrests, knowing full well that doing so could cause the patients to die. Police say he did so in an attempt to show off his resuscitation skills. A former colleague even told the German paper, Bild, that he “always pushed everyone else aside” when resuscitating patients. At work, he was even nicknamed “Resuscitation Rambo.”

During trial hearings, Högel said he felt a sense of euphoria when he was able to bring a patient back to life and felt devastated when he failed, CNN reported. He was eventually caught in the act by a colleague in 2005.

Högel has already been convicted in previous cases for homicide and attempted homicide. He was given his first life sentence in 2015 and those deaths led authorities to investigate hundreds the cases of other patients that he worked with.

During their investigation, authorities reviewed more than 500 patient files and hospital records, exhumed 134 bodies from 67 cemeteries, and conducted dozens of interviews.

Police believe that Högel may be responsible for as many as 200 murders, but can’t be certain because of gaps in his memory and because many patients were cremated before autopsies could be performed. One spokesperson for a group of the victims’ relatives says that number could be as high as 300.

Sentencing

The judge in his case, Judge Sebastian Bührmann, said Högel’s actions were “incomprehensible.”

“The human mind struggles to take in the sheer scale of these crimes,” he added. “I felt like an accountant of death.” Bührmann also cited a psychologist’s assessment that the former nurse was a narcissist who liked to cast himself as a hero.

Prosecutors had sought to charge Högel with 97 murders, but the defense argued that only 55 cases had been proved beyond doubt. The defense said that he should only be found guilty of attempted murder in 14 cases and acquitted of an additional 31.

However, the sentencing judge ultimately handed down Högel’s second life sentence in the most severe form possible under German law, which excludes the possibility of early release after serving 15 years.  

The court also barred him from ever working as a nurse, emergency medical responder or any other job providing care. “We want to be sure that you never, ever again are able to work in such a job,” the judge said.

A psychiatrist who served as an expert witness during the trial said that while Högel did suffer from personality disorders, showed by his like a lack of shame, guilt and empathy, he was still psychologically competent to stand trial and serve his sentence.

In court on Wednesday, Högel asked his victims’ families for forgiveness. “I want to apologise wholeheartedly to every single one of you for what I have done over the years.”

He added that over the course of the trial, he had come to understand the amount of suffering his “terrible deeds” had caused.

But his apology wasn’t received well by many. Gaby Lübben, one of the lawyers representing victims’ relatives, told Bild that the apology was not credible. “He only acted out his remorse to gather plus points […] He should have stayed silent.”

Hospitals Face Criticism

During the trial, many have wondered how the hospitals managed to turn a blind eye to the unusually high mortality rates among Högel’s patients.

Former colleagues at the Delmenhorst clinic admitted to having suspicions about him. However, all of the staff from Oldenburg said they were completely unaware of his actions. The sentencing judge condemned the staff for being oblivious to the rising death toll, calling their missed observations “collective amnesia.”

The judge ordered eight of Högel’s former colleagues to be investigated on perjury because of suspicion they had lied to the court or had withheld evidence in the most recent trial. According to the New York Times, two doctors and two head nurses from the Delmenhorst hospital have been charged with manslaughter. Meanwhile, authorities are investigating other hospital employees and Högel could be called to testify in those trials.

News of Högel’s sentencing comes amid outrage over the behaviors of other healthcare professionals. On Wednesday, prosecutors in Ohio charged a doctor with 25 counts of murder for allegedly overprescribing pain medications to patients.

See what others are saying: (The New York Times) (The Guardian) (Deutsche Welle)

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India’s High Court Rules Groping Child Through Clothing Is Not Sexual Assault

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  • An Indian appeals court judge drew widespread outrage last week after ruling that groping a child over their clothes does not constitute sexual assault since there is no “skin-on-skin” contact.
  • Activists and rights lawyers pointed out that nowhere in the 2012 Protection of Children From Sexual Offenses Act does it state that skin-on-skin contact is required for a sexual assault charge.
  • Since a High Court made the decision, many are concerned that it makes the “skin-on-skin” requirement a precedent that other Indian courts need to heavily consider when ruling on cases.
  • Supreme Court lawyers and the National Commission for Women are now petitioning the Supreme Court to review and reject the decision.

Judge Rules Sexual Assault Needs Skin-on-Skin Contact

In an extremely controversial decision last week, Bombay High Court judge Pushpa Ganediwala ruled that groping a child over their clothes does not constitute sexual assault

The case started in 2016 when a 39-year-old man groped a 12-year-old girl’s chest and attempted to forcibly remove her underwear. He was found guilty of sexual assault by a lower court and sentenced to three years in prison. He later appealed the decision where it ended up in Judge Ganediwala’s appeals court.

Judge Ganediwala came to her decision by writing that the incident didn’t feature any “skin-on-skin” contact, meaning it failed to achieve the statutory requirements for sexual assault. While she acquitted the man of his sexual assault charge, she did find him guilty of molestation and sentenced him to one year in prison.

Challenging the Ruling

The ruling was met with extreme backlash by activists and rights lawyers all across India. Their largest point of contention is that nowhere in the 2012 Protection of Children From Sexual Offenses Act does it state that skin-on-skin contact is required. Beyond obvious and overt sexual acts, only intending to commit an act is enough to meet the statute.

Adding to their concerns is the prominence of the court. The High Court is about the equivalent of a U.S. District Appeals Court, meaning that it has the power to set a precedent. Like in the U.S., precedence plays an important factor in deciding cases and can often act as a way to clarify laws. Judge Ganediwala’s decision effectively makes the “skin-on-skin” metric the rule when deciding future sexual assault cases.

That requirement may be relatively short-lived. Lawyers from India’s Supreme Court Bar, as well as officials and lawyers from the National Commission for Women, are petitioning the Supreme Court to review and reject the decision. It’s unclear what exactly will happen at this time, but for many, the decision touches on a large issue in India: sex crimes.

The country has long struggled with sexual assaults against women and minors, with many thinking the laws and punishments are too lax against perpetrators.

The issue is so prevalent that in 2018, official figures showed that the rape of a woman was reported every 16 minutes.

See what others are saying: (Times of India) (CNN) (CBS NEWS)

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Wealthy Canadian Couple Posed as Motel Workers To Jump Vaccine Queue

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  • Rodney Baker, the CEO of a Canadian casino company, resigned this week after he and his wife were caught traveling to a remote area in Yukon that is home to many indigenous people to jump the coronavirus vaccine queue.
  • The two allegedly posed as motel workers and were given the first dose of the vaccine but raised suspicions when they asked to be taken straight to the airport immediately afterward. 
  • Both individuals received two fines, one for failing to self-isolate and a second for failing to follow their signed declarations, adding up to $1,150 each.
  • The White River First Nation is calling for stiffer penalties, saying the small fine would be meaningless to the wealthy duo. For reference, the former CEO was paid a salary of more than $10.6 million in 2019.  

Couple Dupes Local Healthcare Workers

Like many other countries, officials in Canada have been working hard to ramp up COVID-19 vaccinations. In the Yukon territory specifically, health workers have been giving priority to remote communities with elderly and high-risk populations, as well as limited access to healthcare.

One of those areas is Beaver Creek, which is home to many members of the White River First Nation. However, Beaver Creek is now making headlines after two wealthy Vancouver residents traveled there to jump ahead in the vaccine queue.

The two culprits were identified as 55-year-old Rodney Baker, president and CEO of Great Canadian Gaming Corp, and his wife, 32-year-old actress Ekaterina Baker.

They reportedly flew from Vancouver to Whitehouse, then chartered a private plane to the remote community. Afterward, they went to a mobile clinic where they were able to receive the Moderna vaccine after saying they were new hires at a nearby motel.

Their presence raised suspicions given how small the population is in Beaver Creek, but the two raised even more eyebrows when they asked to be taken straight to the airport after receiving their doses.

Workers from the vaccination clinic checked with the motel and alerted law enforcement when they learned that the Bakers had lied about working there.

The couple was stopped just as they were preparing to fly back to their luxury condo in downtown Vancouver. According to CBC, both individuals received two fines, one for failing to self-isolate and a second for failing to follow their signed declaration, adding up to $1,150 each.

Indigenous Community Responds

“We are deeply concerned by the actions of individuals who put our Elders and vulnerable people at risk to jump the line for selfish purposes,” the White River First Nation’s Chief Angela Demit said in a Facebook statement addressing the situation.

She also told The Washington Post that she wants to see stiffer penalties for the couple because the relatively small fines would be “essentially meaningless” for such wealthy individuals. For reference, Mr. Baker’s annual compensation in 2019 was reported to be more than $10.6 million.

Janet Vander Meer, the head of the White River First Nation’s coronavirus response team, also called the incident, “another example of ongoing acts of oppression against Indigenous communities by wealthy individuals that thought they would get away with it.”

“Our oldest resident of Beaver Creek, who is 88 years old, was in the same room as this couple. My mom, who’s palliative, was in the same room as this couple,” she told Globalnews.ca. “That’s got to be jail time. I can’t see anything less. For what our community has been through the last few days. The exhaustion. It’s just mind-boggling.”

To prevent situations like this in the future, a spokesman for the Yukon government said it would implement new requirements for proving residency in the territory.

As far as the Bakers, Rodney resigned from his role at Great Canadian this week. A spokesperson for the company, which is currently the subject of a separate money-laundering probe, says it “has no tolerance for actions that run counter to the company’s objectives and values.”

See what others are saying: (CBC) (The Washington Post) (Yukon News)

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Protests Erupt Across the Netherlands Over COVID-19 Curfew

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  • For the third night in a row, Dutch police clashed with protesters and rioters in ten cities across the Netherlands.
  • The protests are a result of frustrations over the 9:00 p.m. – 4:30 a.m. curfew the country imposed to help stop the spread of coronavirus.
  • Rioters looted across major cities and even burned down a coronavirus testing site. So far, 184 people have been arrested and thousands have received fines for their participation.
  • The Prime Minister has said that when possible, the curfew would be the first safety measure to go, but he also made it clear that those rioting over it were criminals and will be treated as such.

Violence Over Coronavirus Curfew

The Netherlands faced riots and protests over coronavirus curfews and lockdown measures for the third night in a row.

The protests raged across ten cities, including major ones such as Amsterdam, Rotterdam, and The Hague. Authorities say that 184 people have been arrested so far, and thousands have received fines for their participation.

Protesters are particularly upset with an ongoing curfew in the country that puts restrictions on travel between 9:00 p.m.- 4:30 a.m.. It’s meant to slow the spread of the virus by preventing nightlife activities; however, critics have questioned just how effective those measures actually are.

Beyond the skepticism, the Netherlands is also facing a spread of misinformation about COVID-19, leading many to downplay how dangerous it is.

Last night’s protests led to violence with police, as well as a COVID-19 testing site being burnt to the ground. Wider Dutch society has been shocked by the violence since protests of this nature are relatively rare in the nation.

Mayors across the country vowed to introduce emergency measures that are intended to help deal with the protests.

Coping With the Virus

Regarding the curfew itself, the government has refused to budge on the issue. When responding to last night’s violence, Prime Minister Mark Rutte said that when possible, the curfew would be the first safety measure to go. Still, he also made it clear that those rioting over it were criminals and will be treated as such.

The Netherlands had managed to maintain the virus relatively successfully, six months ago, it had among the lowest new daily cases in Europe, with around 42 daily new cases in July. That all changed in September when cases began to rise dramatically, peaking of 11,499 daily new cases on Dec. 24.

Source: Google Coronavirus Statistics

Due to the imposed restrictions, cases began to fall again, although they are still far higher than they were in the summer of 2020.

See What Others Are Saying: (The Guardian) (BBC) (NPR)

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