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AOC and Ted Cruz Agree to Work Together on Lobbying Bill

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  • A new analysis from the nonprofit consumer advocacy group Public Citizen was released Thursday that revealed the high number of former Congress members who have become lobbyists.
  • Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) responded to the news on Twitter, saying it should be illegal for lobbyists to be former Congress members.  
  • Senator Ted Cruz (R-TX) surprised many by tweeting back and agreeing with Ocasio-Cortez, even offering to help co-sponsor a bill with her on the subject.

What happened

Republican Senator Ted Cruz surprised many on Thursday when he and Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) agreed to collaborate on a bill that bans former Congress members from becoming lobbyists after their terms have ended.

In response to a new analysis from Public Citizen, Ocasio-Cortez took to Twitter to say that it should be illegal for former congress members to become corporate lobbyists.

Cruz then responded and agreed with Ocasio-Cortez. In his tweet, he noted it was rare the two would agree on anything, but said this was an issue he has been fighting for quite some time.

The young democrat was skeptical of Cruz’s intentions, but Ocasio-Cortez wrote back and agreed to work with the Senator on some conditions.

By the end of day Thursday, Cruz and Ocasio-Cortez had become a team, along with two other lawmakers. Both Sen. Brian Schatz (D-HI) and Rep. Chip Roy (R-TX) also joined the Twitter exchange, stating they wanted in on the lobbying bill.

The Analysis

While it was Ocasio-Cortez’s tweet that brought the unlikely team together, the conversation initially stemmed from Public Citizen’s report. The nonprofit consumer advocacy group analyzed the different employment activities of former Congress members from 2017 until January 2019.

Public Citizen found that “of the former members who have found new jobs outside of government and politics, 59% (26 of 44) were working for lobbying firms, consulting firms, trade groups or business groups working to influence federal government activities.”

Since the early 2000s, the concern of former Congress members becoming lobbyists has grown. Many see it as the ex-lawmakers using their connections with their former colleagues to help push through legislation that they favor.

“People who leave government to become lobbyists may provide their new employer unusually good access to their former colleagues,” researchers from the Georgia State University found. “Or they may carry to the private sector insider information about government operations that gives them an unfair advantage in their lobbying efforts.”

On the other side, former Congress members argue that becoming a lobbyist allows them to continue to advocate for laws and causes they believed in and supported during their term. Former Georgia Representative, Jack Kingston, who served from 1993 to 2015, has said that is why he turned to lobbying.

“One of the things about politics is that it’s an itch that you have to keep scratching,” he said according to the Atlantic. “Most people want to keep a finger in the pie of policy or the politics.”

Aside from Thursday’s tweets, Ocasio-Cortez and Cruz have no provided more information on what the bill will entail or how they plan to work together.

See what others are saying: (The Hill) (Boston Globe) (Fox News)

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Privacy Concerns Rise in Florida Over Menstruation Questions on Digital Student-Athlete Physicals

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Ever since the overturn of Roe V. Wade, activists have been concerned about how period tracking data can be used against women.


Outrage and Concerns

Florida schools require student-athletes to complete an annual physical evaluation form before being allowed to participate in sports, including questions about female menstruation. Recently, school districts have shifted these forms into a digital format using a third party, causing privacy concerns for parents and activists alike. 

As headlines started to circulate the news, many online began expressing outrage. Lawyer Pam Keith, who ran for U.S. House of Representatives in 2020 referred to Florida as a “police state for women” on Tuesday morning. Other tweets have called this practice “dystopian” and “tramping on women’s rights.”

In Florida, these questions have been on the student-athlete physical evaluation form for approximately 20 years. Now that some school districts have shifted from paper copies to digital formatting with the third-party software company, Aktivate, criticisms have resurfaced across the state. Abortion rights activists, in particular, are worried about menstrual information being used to prosecute someone for getting an abortion. Others vocally oppose storing this information online, citing parents’ rights over their children’s data. 

Florida’s Policy

These questions relating to menstruation are labeled as optional on the document. However, some have expressed concern that athletes will feel obligated to answer them in order to ensure their eligibility to play. 

Florida schools have all of the medical data collected by these physicals sent back to the district from the physician. This is in sharp contrast to the policy of other states that simply require the physician’s approval for the athlete to be cleared to play. 

“I don’t see why school districts need that access to that type of information,” pediatrician Dr. Michael Haller said to The Florida Times-Union. “It sure as hell will give me pause to fill it out with my kid.”

See what others are saying: (Forbes) (The Palm Beach Post) (The Florida Times-Union

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Navy SEAL Recruits Sprayed With Tear Gas in “Horrific” Leaked Video

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The revelation comes after the Navy launched an investigation into SEAL training practices last month in response to the death of a recruit.


The Worst Birthday Ever

In September 2021, Navy SEAL recruits were forced to sing “happy birthday” while standing amid a thick cloud of tear gas as part of their training, a leaked video reveals.

The footage, which was obtained by investigative reporter Mathew Cole and published by CBS News, comes from California’s San Clemente Island, where SEALs are trained.

For over a minute, instructors are seen dousing the recruits in the chemical, sometimes from just inches away, as they struggle to sing. Reports say they were singing so that they could not hold their breath, which regulations incidentally warn may cause a person to pass out.

Although exposure to tear gas is a common right of passage for military recruits, who must learn how to properly don a face mask, it is meant to be sprayed from six feet away to prevent burns and last for no longer than 15 seconds.

The recruits in the video are seen coughing, heaving, and crying out in agony after the gas subsides, and one appears to pass out.

A Navy admiral has reportedly launched an investigation into the video to determine whether the instructors sprayed the gas for too long and from too close, and if they did, whether they were simply unaware of the proper procedure or intended to abuse and punish the recruits, which could be a criminal offense.

Cole wrote in a Twitter thread that he showed the footage to current and retired senior SEAL officers, who described the exercise as “horrific,” “abusive,” “pointless” and “near torture.”

“Current and former SEAL students say they were told the purpose of the exercise, which cause extreme pain, was to simulate how they would react to bullet wounds in combat,” he said. “They were told by BUD/S instructors it was a ‘rite of passage’ and given three attempts to complete it.”

The Death of Kyle Mullen

“The source who provided the video did so because they wanted the Navy, Congress and the public to know that the February 2022 death of Kyle Mullen was not an isolated incident,” Cole Continued.

Mullen was a 24-year-old Navy recruit who arrived in California for the SEALs rigorous selection course in January. In his third week, he reached what’s known as Hell Week, a five-day-long slog through an infamously brutal training regiment that’s killed at least 11 men since 1953.

Trainees spend at least 20 hours per day doing physical exercises, running a total of more than 200 miles, and are allowed just four hours of sleep across the entire week.

Hell Week is meant to test a recruit’s mental and physical resilience, as well as their commitment to becoming a Navy SEAL. Critics, however, argue it is excessively harsh, pointing to the concussions, broken bones, dangerous infections, and near drownings suffered by some recruits.

When Mullen completed Hell Week, he called his mother Regina, who told CBS News her son seemed to be having trouble breathing.

A few hours later, he died with the official cause being pneumonia, which Regina attributed to the freezing water he was submerged in during training.

She also said he admitted to using banned performance-enhancing drugs, something many aspiring SEALs resort to so they can cross the finish line.

Even with drugs, however, around 90% of trainees fail to complete the selection course, with most dropping out during Hell Week.

The same day Kyle died, one of his fellow trainees had to be intubated, and two more were hospitalized.

The Navy launched an investigation into the SEALs selection course last month in response to Kyle’s death.

See what others are saying: (CBS) (NBC) (The New York Times)

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Lawyer Claims That LAPD Officer Who Died In Training Was Targeted For Investigating Other Officers For Rape

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The late officer’s family has filed a lawsuit against the city of Los Angeles.


Press Conference Reveals New Allegations

A lawyer for the family of Los Angeles Police officer Houston Tipping, who died in May during a training exercise, claimed on Monday that Tipping was targeted for reporting an alleged sexual assault by four other police officers last year. 

In May, Tipping sustained serious injury — including a broken spine — during training, which resulted in his death three days later. The LAPD released a statement saying his injuries came from a fall taken during a segment of training that involved grappling another officer. 

His family, however, filed a complaint — and later a lawsuit — against the city of Los Angeles. The lawsuit states that Tipping was, “repeatedly struck in the head severely enough that he bled.”

During a Monday press conference, his family’s lawyer, Bradley Gage, claimed that the injuries Tipping sustained could not have been the result of grappling.

“There is no way grappling would have caused those kinds of injuries the way the LAPD portrays it,” he said. “What would cause those injuries is if somebody picked a person up, slams them down onto their head and their neck onto a hard surface.”

An Alleged Cover-Up

According to Gage, an officer that Tipping had reported last year for an alleged sexual assault was also present at this training exercise. 

“The allegation is that in July of 2021, four police officers were involved in the sexual assault of a woman from the Los Angeles area. A report was taken by Officer Tipping,” he said. “And the female victim claimed that she was raped by four different people, all LAPD officers. She knew the names of some of those officers because they were in uniform and had their name tags on. The name of one of those officers, with the name tag, seems to correlate with the names of one of the officers that was at the bicycle training” 

The attorney went on to confirm that he is alleging this unnamed officer is responsible for Tipping’s injuries. 

Later in the press conference, Gage stated that the police department is likely trying to cover-up these misdeeds.  

“I’m sure that these actions are being covered-up. The thought of a code of silence or a cover-up by a police department should not be shocking or surprising to anyone,” he said

Although the initial lawsuit by Tipping’s family included the wrongful death and other civil rights violations, with this new information, the family and the attorney has decided to file a supplemental. This supplemental will cover the whistler blower retaliation, destruction of evidence, and the initial wrongdoing of the rape case. 

See what others are saying: (FOX 11 LA) (Washington Post) (LA Times)

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