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New Zealand & France Unite Against Online Extremism

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  • The country’s leaders are holding a summit in Paris next month, where they hope to sign an agreement with other world leaders and tech firms that aims to “end the use of social media for acts of terrorism.”
  • The pledge has been dubbed the “Christchurch Call,” named after the New Zealand city that suffered a deadly terror attack last month.
  • Several major tech companies like Google, Twitter, and Facebook, who were criticized for not curbing the spread of footage from the Christchurch shooting, have expressed interest in working together to address the issue.

The Christchurch Call

New Zealand’s prime minister said Wednesday that she is working with France and other tech companies to agree on ways to stop social media sites from being used to promote terrorism and violent extremist content.

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern will co-chair a meeting with French President Emmanuel Macron in Paris on May 15. There they will ask other world leaders and tech CEOs to agree on a pledge called the “Christchurch Call.”

“This meeting presents an opportunity for an act of unity between governments and the tech companies,” Ardren said in a statement announcing the plan.

The pledge is named the New Zealand city that was attacked last month. On March 15, a gunman killed 50 people at two mosques in Christchurch while live streaming the attack on Facebook. The footage was later reposted on other social sites like YouTube and Twitter.

“It’s critical that technology platforms like Facebook are not perverted as a tool for terrorism, and instead become part of a global solution to countering extremism,” Ardern explained.

“This isn’t about freedom of expression,” she added. “This is about preventing violent extremism and terrorism online.”

Will Tech Firms Join?

At a press conference Wednesday, Ardern said that she had spoken with executives from tech firms like Twitter, Microsoft, Google, and others. She specifically added that she had spoken directly with Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg about the meeting.

“The response I’ve received has been positive. No tech company, just like no government, would like to see violent extremism and terrorism online,” Ardern said.

A Facebook spokesperson said that the company looks forward to collaborating with government, industry, and safety experts on framework rules moving forward.

“We’re evaluating how we can best support this effort and who among top Facebook executives will attend,” the spokesman said in an emailed statement to Reuters.

Google and Twitter also confirmed their support in emailed statements to CNBC. A Google spokesperson said the company will take part in the meeting and added that Google has a zero-tolerance stance of terrorist content.

“We are committed to leading the way in developing new technologies and standards for identifying and removing terrorist content,” the spokesperson said.

“We are working with government agencies, law enforcement and across industry, including as a founding member of the Global Internet Forum to Counter Terrorism, to keep this type of content off our platforms. We will continue to engage on this crucial issue.”

Meanwhile, a Twitter spokesperson told CNBC that they were continuously investing in technology to prevent propaganda and extremist accounts from being posted on the platform.

“Our work will never be complete, as the threats we face constantly evolve,” Twitter’s spokesperson added. “We share a common goal with governments all around the world, including in New Zealand, to find real, lasting solutions to building a safer internet and welcome the opportunity to work together with our peers toward a global solution.”

The meeting will be held alongside the “Tech for Humanity” meeting of G7 digital ministers, and France’s “Tech for Good” summit, both on May 15.

Countries Already Pushing for Changes

France’s involvement in the pledge is unsurprising considering the country’s own history with terrorist attacks. In May, French lawmakers will debate an update to the country’s online hate speech law. The move is an attempt to require social media platforms to take more responsibility for taking down hateful content.

However, this specific joint initiative comes after tech giants like Google, Facebook, and YouTube came under fire for how each handled the removal of the graphic footage of the Christchurch attack being reposted on their platforms.

The reposting and sharing of the footage was a massive issue. Facebook, for instance, said they removed about 1.5 million copies of the footage within 24 hours.

Since the Christchurch shooting, a number of controversial laws aimed at addressing extremist social media content have been passed or proposed in countries like Australia, the U.K., and the EU, but the trend of social sites being used to aid the spread of terrorist acts is one that has continued to be an issue.

In a recent preemptive move, Sri Lanka made the drastic decision to blocked Facebook and other social media platforms after the bombings that killed more than 350 on Easter Sunday. Officials said they feared that misinformation and hate speech on the platforms could potentially provoke more violence.

A Difficult Task

While tech companies and world leaders all seem on board with the general idea of trying to combat extremist content online, creating a plan of action will not be easy.

As of now, no specifics on what the “Christchurch Call”  will include have been announced. In fact, Ardern acknowledged that the details will be “incredibly difficult” to formulate and said she is unclear exactly what she and Macron plan to ask the tech firms to do.

According to the New York Times, some analysts have warned that if the agreement does not outline specific consequences for failing to stop extremist content, then it would likely won’t alter any tech companies’ behavior.

See what others are saying: (Reuters) (The New York Times) (CNBC)  



International

Accusations Against Chinese Actress Shine Light on the Nation’s Surrogacy Laws

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  • Chinese actress Zheng Shuang is facing major backlash after her former partner, Zhang Heng, accused her of abandoning her two children born through U.S.-based surrogates.
  • Beyond public outcry and losing brand deals, Zheng is likely facing legal consequences after a Chinese government agency said that using a legal loophole to obtain a surrogate from abroad was “definitely not innocent.” 
  • Zheng denies the claims and hasn’t confirmed if the children are actually hers, although she’s listed as their mother on their birth certificates.
  • As for the children in question, Zhang has been taking care of them in the U.S.

American-Based Surrogacy Cause Controversy

Chinese social media users have launched into debates surrounding how the rich and elite circumvent domestic laws in order to obtain surrogate services.

The latest controversy is surrounding actress Zheng Shuang. Though she has never confirmed this publicly, Zheng allegedly went to the U.S. with her-now-ex Zhang Heng and had two children with the help of American surrogates. However, on Monday, Zhang accused Zheng of abandoning the children and leaving him to take care of them in the U.S. The couple reportedly broke up before the babies were born due to Zhang’s alleged infidelity.

According to the South China Morning Post, Zhang’s friend released a voice recording on the Chinese platform NetEase Entertainment. In it, Zhang and Zheng are allegedly having a discussion with their parents over what to do with the then-unborn children. Zheng’s father suggested that they abandon the children at the hospital, while Zheng reportedly expressed annoyance that they could not be aborted so late in pregnancy.

Legal Grey Zone Likely Won’t Help

Beyond public outcries, Zheng lost a recent brand deal with Prada that she signed just eight days before the accusations were made. Additionally, other brand partners, such as Aussie, have distanced themselves from the actress. She also faces multiple awards she has won being revoked as well as potential legal consequences.

Currently, surrogacy is illegal in China; however, the laws have a legal grey zone. Technically, providing surrogacy is what is illegal, but obtaining one from abroad is not explicitly mentioned, even if it goes against the spirit of the law.

The Central Political and Legal Affairs Commission of the Communist Party commented on the situation in a Weibo video post, saying that using this legal loophole to get a surrogacy was “definitely not innocent.” 

“Surrogacy is banned in China as it uses women’s uteruses as a tool and sells life as a commercial product.,” it continued. “As a Chinese citizen, the act of traveling to the US on a legal loophole is not abiding the law.” 

Following the post, companies like Blued, a gay dating app in China, took down sections of their apps that helped users set up services with surrogacy firms overseas.

Surrogacy is a controversial subject in China, with many actors and actresses obtaining them overseas, but many social media users across the country are against the practice. Officially, the government claims that it “overlooks life” and “tramples the bottom line [of human morality].

Zheng has denied claims that she abandoned any children, and has never confirmed whether or not she actually has any, although she is listed as the mother on the children’s birth certificates.

As for the children in question, even though Zheng’s father suggested abandoning them in the hospital, her ex has been taking care of them in the U.S.

See What Others Are Saying: (South China Morning Post) (Straits Times) (New York Times)

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International

American Influencer Kristen Gray To Be Deported From Bali

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  • In a viral Twitter thread, influencer Kristen Gray encouraged people to move to Bali like she did while promoting her eBook and other resources on how to do so amid COVID-19 restrictions.
  • Many criticized her for encouraging an influx of travelers during the pandemic. She also sparked conversations about gentrification and was slammed for falsely characterizing Indonesia as queer-friendly.
  • The local government promised to deport her Tuesday, arguing that selling her book and offering paid consultations on traveling to Bali violated the purpose of her visitor stay permit. They also say she was “spreading information that could unsettle the public.”
  • “I am not guilty. I have not overstayed my visa. I have not made money in Indonesian rupiah in Indonesia,” Gray told reporters. “I put out a statement about LGBT and I am being deported because of LGBT.”

Kristen Gray Goes Viral

Officials in Indonesia said Tuesday that they will deport Kristen Gray, an American influencer who has caused international outrage in the last week.

Gray moved to Bali with her girlfriend in 2019 with plans to stay for six months. In reality, the couple ended up staying much longer because of the coronavirus pandemic, and in a viral Twitter thread, Gray shared how positive their experience has been.

Gray pointed to several benefits of moving to Bali in her posts, like its safety, low cost of living, luxury lifestyle, as well as its queer-friendly and Black communities.

She also encouraged others to make the same move and promoted their $30 eBook “Our Bali Life Is Yours” for tips on how to do it. “We include direct links to our visa agents and how to go about getting to Indonesia during COVID,” she even wrote in one post.

Backlash

The thread sparked outrage for encouraging an influx of travelers to a country that has closed its borders over the worsening pandemic. On top of that, it sparked conversations about the gentrification of neighborhoods there.

Bali is a major tourist destination for Americans, Europeans, and Australians in particular, and like areas all over the world, it has suffered from the loss in visitors this year.

However, many online noted that locals have been steadily priced out of certain areas of the island as foreigners open businesses to cater to tourists. Others argue that poorly regulated development is also destroying industries that Balinese people have historically relied on.

Aside from those criticisms, many people also took issue with Gray characterizing Bali as a queer-friendly when the reality for locals is far different.

“It well may be the case for you. However, please recognize that it is because a) you’re a foreigner and b) you have economic leverage since the Indonesian local community is financially dependent on keeping you happy so they don’t mess with you,” a user named Kai Mata said in a viral TikTok.

“Please realize for the rest of us Indonesians on the island, this is not a queer-friendly place. Our gay communities are often shut down and raided by authorities and Indonesia at large has tried to mandate conversion therapy for us the LGBTQ+ Community.

Government Responds

The local government responded to the public outrage over Gray’s thread Tuesday. In a statement, it said selling her book and also offering paid consultations on traveling to Bali violated the purpose of her visitor stay permit, which was valid until January 24.

Gray was also accused of “spreading information that could unsettle the public” by saying Bali is queer-friendly and suggesting foreigners travel there during the pandemic.

According to Reuters, she was being held at an immigration detention facility Tuesday and was to be deported as soon as a flight was available.

In a brief statement to the Balinese press, Gray defended herself. “I am not guilty. I have not overstayed my visa. I have not made money in Indonesian rupiah in Indonesia. I put out a statement about LGBT and I am being deported because of LGBT,” she explained.

Many of her fans believe her and also argue that she is seeing this level of criticism because she is a Black woman.

See what others are saying: (New York Times) (Reuters) (Vulture)

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International

Petition Calls for Ban on Sexualized Fanfiction in South Korea

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  • A petition circulating across South Korea calls for sexualized fanfiction depicting K-pop stars and other real people to be outlawed and classified as sex crimes.
  • The petition particularly focuses on the way male stars are depicted in same-sex relationships and argues that they often feature people who are minors.
  • A similar petition was submitted last week to President Moon Jae-in; however, it focused on deep fakes. Because both petitions have over 200,000 signatures, they will need to be addressed by President Moon.

K-Pop Fanfiction Causes Chaos

A petition began circulating across South Korea this week demanding that “real person slash” fanfiction works be outlawed and charged as sex crimes.

“Real person slash” refers to a specific form of fanfiction that most often features sexualized versions of K-pop stars and other real people.

In particular, the petition focuses on the way male stars are depicted in same-sex relationships and the age of some of the people being portrayed. The petition notes, “due to the nature of the profession of idols, whose average age is young, many of the victims are still minors or children.”

The petition was submitted to the Blue House, South Korea’s version of the White House, and currently has over 200,000 signatures. It received a big boost in attention after K-pop star Nancy, from the group Momoland, was secretly filmed by a member of her agency while she was changing backstage. This person then doctored some of the images and uploaded them online.

While Nancy’s case isn’t hand-drawn fanfic, it did fuel outrage at what’s seen as an ineffective approach towards sex crimes in the country. Signers of this petition believe that these fanfics fall into the same category of likely illegality as deep fakes.

Deep Fakes Also Being Targeted

Additionally, just last week deep fakes – which often feature k-pop stars – had its own petition submitted to the president last week with over 300,000 signatures.

Because both petitions have over 200,000 signatures, they will need to be addressed by President Moon Jae-in

For years South Korea has struggled with secret cameras, deep fakes, revenge porn, and more violent sex crimes, such as the infamous Nth Room case that saw certain stars filming themselves having sex with women against their consent.

See What Others Are Saying: (CNA) (The Korea Herald) (South China Morning Post)

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