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Trump Goes After McCain, Prompting Republicans to Go After Trump

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  • President Donald Trump said he was never thanked for John McCain’s funeral during a speech on Wednesday.
  • Trump also said that he “never liked” the late senator.
  • Many people, Republicans included, are upset by these remarks, even going so far as to call Trump “deplorable.”

What did Trump Say?

Several Republican leaders have spoken out against President Donald Trump after he claimed he was never thanked for veteran and Senator John McCain’s funeral.

“I’ve never liked him much,” Trump said of McCain, starting what ended up being a five-minute-long series of attacks against the late politician during a speech in Lima, Ohio.

During this speech, Trump brought up McCain’s choice to not vote to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. Trump also criticized the work McCain did for veterans and brought up his funeral.

“And I gave him the kind of funeral he wanted,” Trump said. “Which as president, I had to approve. I don’t care about this. I didn’t get a thank you, that’s okay. We sent him on the way. But I wasn’t a fan of John McCain.”

When McCain passed in August of 2018, Trump approved military transport for his services in Washington D.C. However, the president was not invited to attend the services himself. McCain only extended the invitation to former presidents, asking both George W. Bush and Barack Obama to speak.

These comments are the latest in Trump’s most recent strick of attacks against McCain. On March 16 and 17, he sent out a series of tweets accusing him of spreading the intelligence dossier that contained information about his administration.

Trump claims that McCain delivered the dossier to the FBI prior to the 2016 election. However, many counter this, saying the senator did not pass the information over until after.

Republicans Speak Out

Many people have criticized the president’s remarks, accusing him of being out of line, including members of his own party.

Sen. Johnny Isakson (R-Ga) said on a radio show that his attacks on McCain are “deplorable.”

“It was deplorable what he said,” Isakson claimed. “That’s what called it on the floor of the Senate seven months ago. It will be deplorable seven months from now if he says it again. And I will continue to speak out.”

Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) also spoke out, and called McCain an “American hero.”

“He’s an American hero and nothing will ever diminish that,” said Graham, who has generally been supportive of Trump since his election. “I think the president’s comments about Senator McCain hurt him more than they hurt the legacy of Senator McCain.”

Sen. Mitt Romney (R-Utah,) who has been critical of Trump in the past, called him out once again.


Former California Governor and actor Arnold Schwarzenegger also spoke to the Atlantic about Trump’s continued attacks on McCain, and called them unacceptable.

“An attack on him is absolutely unacceptable if he’s alive or dead,” Schwarzenegger said. “But even twice as unacceptable since he passed away a few months ago.”

Bridget McCain, the senator’s adopted daughter, who usually refrains from the public eye, also took to Twitter to condemn the president.

Other GOP leaders, like Sen. Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky), Sen. Martha McSally, (R-Ariz), and Sen. Dan Sullivan (R-AK) tweeted in response to the comments but did so without naming Trump. Instead, they took time to thank McCain for his work and service.

Lou Dobbs Defends Trump

While many on the right chose to defend McCain instead of Trump, some did take the side of the president. During his show on Fox Business, Lou Dobbs justified Trump’s attacks and denounced those who were criticizing them.

“Now there’s a reason for those nasty remarks,” he said. “There’s a history between those two men. And the people who were attacking him, including Mitch McConnell, attacking the president for his views on Johnn McCain is asinine.”

See What Others Are Saying: (Washington Post) (New York Times) (Fox News)

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Slavery Reparations Hearing Sparks Debate

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  • A House Judiciary Subcommittee held a hearing on Wednesday for a bill that proposes the formation of a commission that would discuss potential reparations for slavery.
  • Many people got the chance to speak at the hearing, with some showing support for the bill and others arguing that there are more pressing issues facing the African American community today that should be addressed instead.
  • The bill could see a vote in the House, but many say it is unlikely to pass the Senate.
  • Mitch McConnell has already expressed a disinterest in reparations.

The Hearing

A House Judiciary Subcommittee held the first hearing in a decade for a bill relating to slavery reparations.

On Wednesday, the Subcommittee on the Constitution, Civil Rights and Civil Liberties opened its doors to leaders from a variety of fields to speak about H.R. 40. The legislation was introduced by Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee (D-TX). The bill proposes the formation of a commission to “study and consider a national apology and proposal for reparations for the institution of slavery.”

The bill itself does not directly propose any type of reparations, just a commission to look into the potential of them. These reparations could potentially include compensation to descendants.

During the hearing, which was notably held on June 19, or Juneteenth, a holiday commemorating the emancipation of slaves in Texas, several speakers, including Jackson Lee, Sen. Cory Booker (D-NJ), actor and activist Danny Glover, and more got the chance to take the mic.

Jackson Lee said this bill is “long overdue.” She added that even though slavery ended close to 150 years ago, African Americans are still living with its long-term impacts.

“One million African Americans are incarcerated, that is a continuing impact,” she said. “The black unemployment rate is 6.6 percent, in spite of what has been said currently, more than double the national unemployment rate. 31 percent of black children live in poverty in comparison to 11 percent of white children.”

Writer Ta-Nehisi Coates also spoke during the hearing. He addressed the common argument that asks why present-day Americans should be financially responsible for something that happened generations back.

“We honor treaties that date back some 200 years despite no one being alive who signed those treaties,” he sated. “Many of us would love to be taxed for the things we are solely and individually responsible for. But we are American citizens, and thus bound to a collective enterprise that extends beyond our individual and personal reach.”

Others did argue against H.R. 40. Writer Coleman Hughes said that he believes it is an “injustice” that there were never reparations made in the past, however, there are more pressing issues to deal with in the present.

“Black people don’t need another apology,” he said. “We need safer neighborhoods and better schools. We need a less punitive criminal justice system. We need affordable healthcare.”

Reparations in the U.S.

H.R. 40 is named for the phrase “40 acres and a mule,” which was commonly used to describe the original reparations slaves were promised after the Civil War. An order was signed to give 400,000 acres of land that used to belong to the Confederates in the south to recently freed slaves. Families would get up to 40 acres of land, and while this was not specified in the order, some families would also receive an army mule.

However, none of the former slaves ever saw that land. When President Andrew Johnson succeeded President Abraham Lincoln, he reversed the order. The land ended up going back to its Confederate owners.

The government later proposed a form of pensions, but nothing ever came of it. Now-retired Rep. John Conyers Jr. (D-MI) proposed a version of H.R. 40 every year between 1989 and 2017. Nothing ever came of it during that period, but the bill Jackson Lee is pushing is a re-introduction of it.

Future of H.R. 40

House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer (D-MD) said that if the bill gets through the Judiciary Committee, he expects the House to vote on it. Currently, H.R. 40 has the support of Chairman Jerry Nadler (D-NY), Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA), the Congressional Black Caucus, and several other Democrats.

Many anticipate that if it gets through the House, it could hit a wall in the Senate. House Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) has already expressed a disinterest in reparations.

“I don’t think reparations for something that happened 150 years ago for whom none of us currently living are responsible is a good idea,” McConnell said to reporters on Tuesday. “We’ve tried to deal with our original sin of slavery by fighting a civil war, by passing landmark civil rights legislation. We elected an African American president.”

See what others are saying: (Politico) (Washington Post) (Fox News)

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ICE To Begin Mass Immigration Arrests

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  • President Donald Trump said in a tweet Monday that Immigration and Customs Enforcement will begin “removing the millions of illegal aliens” who have made their way into the U.S.
  • Senior White House and ICE officials said they had already planned to ramp up their efforts, but Trump’s choice to publicly announce their plans came as a surprise.
  • Some ICE officials worry that publicly announcing their usually covert operations could both endanger agents and undermine the effectiveness of their plans, though the acting director of ICE disagrees and says Trump’s tweet did not give any specifics that would put agents at risk.
  • Experts and ICE officials say that even deporting one million is unrealistic, noting that ICE already lacks the resources to deal with the current influx of immigrants.

Announcement

President Donald Trump announced in a tweet Monday that Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) will begin “removing the millions of illegal aliens who have illicitly found their way into the United States” starting next week.

Following the announcement, it was reported that ICE officials were surprised by the tweet. According to reports, senior White House and ICE officials said Monday they were not aware that Trump planned to share their enforcement plans on Twitter.

Part of the reason the tweet cames as a surprise for immigration officials is due to the fact that large-scale ICE operations are usually kept secret to avoid tipping off illegal immigrants.

Announcing those kinds of plans publically could potentially jeopardize months of planning that requires secrecy to be effective.

In fact, just last year, Trump threatened the mayor of Oakland, California with criminal prosecution for obstruction of justice after she alerted her residents to a coming raid.

On Tuesday, the Washington Post reported that both current and former ICE officials said that Trump’s unexpected tweet blew the cover for their planned operations.

The officials did not say if Trump’s tweet referenced a specific operation they were planning, but they did confirm that they are preparing to launch a new effort to take thousands of illegal immigrants into custody.

The officials who spoke to the Post also predicted that Trump’s tweet could cause immigrants who are at threat of being deported to leave known addresses in the next few days, which would make it much harder for ICE officials to find and deport people and undermine Trump’s plan to ramp up deportations entirely.

Other experts also worry that publically announcing ICE’s operations could endanger ICE agents. A former senior ICE official told a BuzzFeed News that Trump’s announcement is “putting officer safety at risk,” adding “This is not presidential. This is not leadership.”

However, the new acting director of ICE, Mark Morgan, said yesterday in an interview with PBS that he did not think Trump’s tweet put agents at risk because it did not give specifics.

“I’m not concerned,” Morgan said. “They’re professionals. They know exactly what they need to do.”

ICE Resources

Another reason Trump’s tweet surprised ICE officials is due to the fact that ICE simply does not have the resources to arrest “millions” of people.

According to estimates from Pew Research Center, in 2017, there were about 10.5 million people who live in the U.S. illegally.

Sources: Pew Research Center

Trump administration officials have specified that the new plan will focus on rounding up the more than one million people who have been given final deportation orders, which means a judge has already ruled they should be deported.

However, even just deporting one million rather than “millions” is a huge task. For context, the record number for deportations in a year was 419,384 in 2012 under former President Barack Obama. Even then, it still took the Obama administration nearly four years to hit the one million mark.

During the eight years of the George W. Bush administration, a total of two million people were deported. In contrast, ICE deported 256,085 people in Fiscal Year 2018, according to data from the agency.

Source: Immigration and Customs Enforcement

Already, Trump faces a plethora of challenges. Illegal border crossings are currently at their highest levels in more than a decade.

At the same time, deportations have gone down in recent months, according to the Post, which reported that recent ICE data showed that the agency is averaging around 7,000 deportations a month.

Right now, ICE does not have enough funding or detention space for the current level of detainees, much less nearly quadruple that.

According to the Associated Press, as of June 8, the total number of adult detainees alone was 53,141, despite the fact that the agency is only budgeted for 45,000. Ramping up arrests will just create more detainees.

To complicate matters more, there are not enough ICE agents to carry out the deportations at the rate that Trump has suggested. Currently, there are around 5,000 officers in Enforcement and Removal Operations (ERO), the branch of ICE that carries out deportations.

As a result, experts say that such a large-scale push would be extremely expensive and highly unlikely.

There is also the question of overall effectiveness. In order to even attempt to reach the numbers Trump suggested, agents will have to raid homes individually.

However, in those sweeps, agents work from recent addresses, which could be problematic if their predictions are true, and Trump’s announcement prompted illegal immigrants to leave their current addresses.

Agents also often do not have search warrants, so illegal immigrants are not required to open their doors. As a result, ICE agents usually capture about 30 to 40 percent of targets, according to the Associated Press.

What Next?

While Trump’s annoucement may have come as a surprise, his plans to aggressively pursue mass deportations are not.

Last month, the Post reported that former Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen and then-acting ICE Director Ronald Vitiello left the Trump administration partly because of the fact that they “challenged a secret White House plan to arrest thousands of parents and children in a blitz operation against migrants in 10 major U.S. cities.”

According to Homeland Security officials, the two were concerned about the effectiveness of the plan as well as the public outrage it could cause. Trump pulled Vitiello’s nomination for ICE director back April because he wanted the agency to go in a “tougher direction.”

Already, the new acting director does seem to at least talk tougher. In his first two weeks at the job, Morgan has said publicly that he wants to increase enforcement and go after families with deportation orders.

Again, law enforcement officials are worried about the public backlash, especially when it comes to families.

See what others are saying: (The Washington Post) (The Associated Press) (Fox News)

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Sarah Huckabee Sanders to Leave White House

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  • President Donald Trump announced that Sarah Huckabee Sanders will be leaving her role as White House Press Secretary at the end of the month.
  • He broke the news in a tweet where he thanked her for her work and encouraged her to run for governor of Arkansas.
  • Speaking at a White House event, Sanders said she was proud to serve her country and looks forward to spending more time with her children.

Trump Announces Sanders’ Departure

President Donald Trump announced Thursday that Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders will be leaving her role at the White House at the end of the month.

Trump took to Twitter to announce Sanders’ departure. He thanked her for a “job well done.” He also encouraged her to follow in her father’s footsteps and run for governor in her home state of Arkansas, where she will be returning after leaving her post. Her father, Mike Huckabee, served as governor in the state from 1996 to 2007.

Sanders began working for the Trump campaign’s communications team in 2016. Once elected, Sanders was deputy press secretary. She landed her current position in July 2017, jumping in after Sean Spicer’s resignation.

During her tenure, Sanders, who was known to have combative relationships with some reporters, opted to not hold traditional daily White House press briefings. The news of her exit came on the 94th straight day without one. Instead, Sanders often let the President speak for himself.

The news also came as the communications director position remains vacant. The spot has been empty since Bill Shine left in March.

Remarks Made at White House Event

Trump again took time to thank Sanders for her time in his administration on Thursday during an event devoted to criminal justice reform.

“She’s done an incredible job and we’ve been through a lot together,” the president said.

Sanders also got the chance to take the mic during the event.

“I’ll try not to get emotional because I know that crying can make us look weak sometimes,” Sanders opened.

“I couldn’t be prouder to have the opportunity to serve my country and particularly to work for this President…I’ve loved every minute, even the hard minutes,” Sanders said before saying she looked forward to spending more time with her three children after leaving the job.

Sanders also posted a similar sentiment to Twitter.

President Trump has not yet announced who will replace Sanders.

See what others are saying: (ABC) (TIME) (Wall Street Journal)

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